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Quick question on Brite Tank with a lager

 
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OkieDokie



Joined: 31 Aug 2013
Posts: 187
Location: Oklahoma

Drinking: Electric ale, Weizen

Working on: Electric lager, American Amber Ale, Dirty Blonde


PostLink    Posted: Sat Sep 07, 2013 4:17 pm    Post subject: Quick question on Brite Tank with a lager Reply with quote


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When I did the Step by Step Blonde Ale I transferred to new carboys and added gelatin to clarify for a couple of days. It was at room temperature and worked like a charm.

I have a the same Step by Step Blonde Lager going and is ready for transfer to Brite Tank and gelatin to clarify. My question is do I have to keep the carboys in my temperature controlled fermentation chamber or can I now let them sit at room temperature since they are most likely finished fermenting (or are finished as my FG is 1.011) while they clarify?

Could not find this info in my books. Thanks.
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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9607
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Janet's Brown, Maibock, Kolsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: West Coast Blaster (American Red IPA)


PostLink    Posted: Sat Sep 07, 2013 10:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Doesn't really matter. Gelatine will work better colder however.

This is why the instructions for all my recipes say:

"Rack to brite tank (secondary), crash chill to near freezing (if possible), add 1 tsp of unflavoured gelatine dissolved in a cup of hot distilled water per 5 gallons of beer, and let clear for 2-3 days. "

Kal

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perogi



Joined: 12 Feb 2012
Posts: 819
Location: NH

Drinking: Perogi Pale, NEIPA, Nutter's Crossing Nut Brown Ale, What the helles a kolsch?

Working on: More Perogi Pale, Edmund Fitzgerald Porter Clone


PostLink    Posted: Sun Sep 08, 2013 12:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kal do you carbonate your beer before, during or after clearing it?
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9607
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Janet's Brown, Maibock, Kolsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: West Coast Blaster (American Red IPA)


PostLink    Posted: Sun Sep 08, 2013 1:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

After. Goes something like this:

- Ferment until done in primary and then wait an extra week (often dry hopping) in plastic 8 gallon pails
- Rack to brite tanks (5 gal glass carboys) and add gelatine, wait 2-4 days
- Keg and place in conditioning fridge at ~0F on CO2 to carb (takes about ~2 weeks)

The conditioning fridge usually has 6 kegs in it (max that it holds) so that when one pops in my 8-keg keezer, I just grab whatever I feel like putting on tap next.

The the conditioning fridge is full and I keg something, I just make sure the headspace in the keg is purged with CO2 and the keg sits beside the fridge until there's a free spot. This happens all the time... I either brew too much, or drink too little, or both. Wink

Kal

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Last edited by kal on Sun Sep 08, 2013 1:29 pm; edited 1 time in total
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perogi



Joined: 12 Feb 2012
Posts: 819
Location: NH

Drinking: Perogi Pale, NEIPA, Nutter's Crossing Nut Brown Ale, What the helles a kolsch?

Working on: More Perogi Pale, Edmund Fitzgerald Porter Clone


PostLink    Posted: Sun Sep 08, 2013 2:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks boss!
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smaillet



Joined: 04 Jun 2018
Posts: 4



PostLink    Posted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 7:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do you purge the oxygen from glass carboy when racking to brite tank? If so, how do you accomplish this?

Thanks,

Stephane
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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9607
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Janet's Brown, Maibock, Kolsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: West Coast Blaster (American Red IPA)


PostLink    Posted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 8:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

smaillet wrote:
Do you purge the oxygen from glass carboy when racking to brite tank? If so, how do you accomplish this?

Yup. I purge any and all vessels that receive beer, from carboys to kegs to bottles. I have a hose off my gas manifold that I simply drop in to the bottom of the vessel and let the gas run until there's CO2 billowing out (it has a strong/acrid smell). I let it run a bit longer to make sure it's fairly concentrated. The vessel is then closed, put in position, lid removed, and filled quickly, closed again and re-purged again a bit to be safe (ex: burping a keg).

Kal

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smaillet



Joined: 04 Jun 2018
Posts: 4



PostLink    Posted: Fri Jun 08, 2018 11:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the response Kal. I assumed the process would be something like this. Here are a couple follow up questions:

1-When you say the vessel is closed, how exactly do you close the glass carboy? Do you use a solid stopper?
2-When removing the lid, you describe filling the vessel quickly. For reference, how much time does that usually take?
3-How long would the CO2 remain in the vessel without a lid when transferring the liquid into it. Would using a counterflow method be a good idea in this case or am I overthinking this?

Thanks,

Stephane
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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9607
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Janet's Brown, Maibock, Kolsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: West Coast Blaster (American Red IPA)


PostLink    Posted: Fri Jun 08, 2018 12:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

smaillet wrote:
1-When you say the vessel is closed, how exactly do you close the glass carboy? Do you use a solid stopper?

Yes. A rubbing stopper with an airlock filled with water.

Quote:
2-When removing the lid, you describe filling the vessel quickly. For reference, how much time does that usually take?

Not sure. I've never timed it. Whatever time it takes to gravity feed 5 gallons. Maybe 2-3 mins? You want to be gentle with racking, not move the hose and splash around, not move the keg/carboy. Closed transfers will be more foolproof if you want to do that.

Quote:
3-How long would the CO2 remain in the vessel without a lid when transferring the liquid into it.

CO2 doesn't jump out of the vessel. It's a bit heavier than air, but any air movement's going to possibly 'pull' some up and out and start stirring things up. Think of it as filling the vessel with smoke. If you do that and then leave the vessel out where there's air movement, air passing above will pull up smoky air inside the vessel (a bit like the venturi effect) mixing the smoky air with 'regular' air. I wouldn't do this sort of purging anywhere but in my brewery where there's very little or almost no air movement at all. I fill and close while it's still filling with CO2 to ensure high concentration, only move the vessel when it's closed, and only have it open for a short period of time to fill (CO2 is pushed out), then close and seal and re-purge to make sure.

Quote:
Would using a counterflow method be a good idea in this case or am I overthinking this?

Counterflow bottle fillers are exactly the same idea. It's just all done in one motion (purge with CO2 and immediately fill with beer). That's exactly what I'm doing, with a slightly longer delay between the two actions (purge and fill) where I make sure the vessel is closed in between to not lose any CO2.

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
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