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The Electric Pale Ale (sessionable version)
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 7683
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Pale Ale (sessionable), Mild, NEIPA, Schwarzbier, Kölsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Saison


PostLink    Posted: Tue Oct 07, 2014 4:09 pm    Post subject: The Electric Pale Ale (sessionable version) Reply with quote


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This is a lower alcohol 'sessionable' version of our Electric Pale Ale (4.3% ABV instead of 6.0% ABV), perfect for those days when you're looking for all the flavour but don't necessarily want to feel the effects after having a few pints.

What is a session beer? According to Wikipedia, it comes from the term "session drinking":

Quote:
Session drinking is a chiefly British term that refers to drinking a large quantity of beer during a "session" (i.e. a specific period of time) without becoming intoxicated. A session is generally a social occasion. A “session beer”, such as a session bitter, is a beer that has a moderate or relative low alcohol content. In the United States, a recent session beer definition has been proposed by beer writer Lew Bryson. His Session Beer Project blog includes a definition of 4.5% ABV or less for session beer. Followers of this definition include Notch Brewing, a session only beer brand. The Brewer Association has adopted a new category within their Great American Beer Fest competition which states a "session beer" must not exceed 4.1% ABW (5.1% ABV).

Like our regular Electric Pale Ale, this is an all late-addition American Pale Ale (APA) where hops are mostly only added late in the boil to give it very smooth bitterness with a massive hop flavour. (More information on late hopping on Jamil's site here).

Lower alcohol beers can become harsh when over-hopped, so the hop additions that were originally added at 20 mins were cut by 50% to lower the IBU and also moved to first wort. First Wort Hopping (FWH) is a process where hops are added to the boil kettle as the wort is being sparged from the mash/lauter tun and then left to steep at 140-160F while the boil kettle is being filled. Why is this done? To quote How to Brew:

Quote:
As the boil tun fills with wort (which may take a half hour or longer), the hops steep in the hot wort and release their volatile oils and resins. The aromatic oils are normally insoluble and tend to evaporate to a large degree during the boil. By letting the hops steep in the wort prior to the boil, the oils have more time to oxidize to more soluble compounds and a greater percentage are retained during the boil.

A blind tasting among professional German brewers determined that the use of FWH resulted in a more refined hop aroma, a more uniform bitterness (i.e. no harsh tones), and a more harmonious beer overall compared to an identical beer produced without FWH.

The 10 minute, end of boil, and dry hopping amounts were kept the same in order to maintain the hop flavour and aroma we enjoy in our regular Electric Pale Ale.

A large portion of the hop goodness comes from the Citra dry hops - they're essential (IMHO).

To lower the alcohol while keeping most of the flavour, we reduced the amount of 2-Row and Vienna malt but kept the Crystal malt the same.

To avoid drying out the beer too much, the single infusion mash temperature was raised from 152F to 160F and we use a healthy dose of Carapils® or Carafoam®. This raises both the original gravity and final gravity as this malt produces mostly unfermentable sugars. The higher mash temperature helps ensure we end up at the target gravity we want (1.012), slightly higher than the 1.010 final gravity of our normal Electric Pale Ale. Too low and the beer will taste overly thin, a common problem with lower alcohol version of beers where nothing but the amount of malt is modified. When making lower ABV versions of your favourite beers you want to re-assess the percentages used in the grist.

I first brewed this on August 21, 2014 (batch #176) and many times since then. It's now replaced my regular Electric Pale Ale as the 'house beer'. Brew up a batch and let me know how you like it!

Interested in seeing what we're brewing right now? Follow our Instagram feed for pictures and videos of our brewing activities as they happen.

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The Electric Pale Ale (sessionable version)



Size: 12.0 US gal (post boil @ 68F)
Mash Efficiency: 95%
Attenuation: 73.0%
Calories: 149 kcal per 12.0 fl oz

Original Gravity: 1.045
Terminal Gravity: 1.012
Color: 5.7 SRM
Alcohol: 4.3%
Bitterness: 33 IBU

Ingredients:
11.3 lb Domestic 2-Row Malt (67.7%)
2.5 lb Weyermann Vienna Malt (15.5%)
0.9 lb Crystal Malt 40L (5.6%)
1.8 lb Carapils®/Carafoam® (11.2%)
0.5 oz Centennial Hops (10.9%) - added first wort*, boiled 60 min [4.8 IBU]
0.5 oz Amarillo Hops (8.7%) - added first wort*, boiled 60 min [3.8 IBU]
1 Whirlfloc Tablet (Irish moss) - added during boil, boiled 15 min
2 oz Centennial Hops (10.9%) - added during boil, boiled 10 min [13.6 IBU]
2 oz Amarillo Hops (8.7%) - added during boil, boiled 10 min [10.9 IBU]
2 oz Centennial Hops (10.9.2%) - added during boil, boiled 0 min
2 oz Amarillo Hops (8.7%) - added during boil, boiled 0 min
24 g Fermentis Safale US-05 dry yeast
2 oz Citra Hops (11.1%) - added dry to secondary fermenter

*First wort hops are added to the boil kettle while you're sparging (before the wort is boiled). For IBU calculations, first wort hopping is said to be similar to a 20 minute addition.

Notes:
Add 500mg potassium metabisulphite to 20 gallons water to remove chlorine/chloramine (as required).
Water treated with brewing salts to: Ca=110, Mg=18, Na=16, Cl=50, S04=275
(Basically Randy Mosher's ideal Pale Ale numbers with slightly less Sulphate).
For complete details on how to adjust your water, refer to our step by step Water Adjustments guide.
1.25 qt/lb mash thickness. Single infusion mash at 160F for 90 mins (yes, 160F). Mashout to 168F.
60-90 min fly sparge with ~6 pH water. Collect 13.9 gallons in the boil kettle.
Boil for 60 minutes. Lid on at flameout with 0 minute hops, start chilling immediately.
Cool wort to 66F and aerate well. Ferment at 66-68F until complete.
Add dry hops once fermentation is nearing completion (ie: below 1.015). Dry hop for 7-10 days total.
Rack to brite tank (secondary), crash chill to near freezing (if possible), add 1 tsp of unflavoured gelatin dissolved in a cup of hot distilled water per 5 gallons of beer, and let clear for 2-3 days.
Package as you would normally. I keg and carbonate on the low side (around 2 to 2.2 volumes of C02) to minimize carbonic bite and let the hop/malt flavour come through.

If you prefer to use liquid yeast, either of these is an excellent choice as they are the same clean fermenting Chico strain as US-05:

Wyeast 1056 American Ale
White Labs WLP-001 California Ale

You'll need to use 4 packs/vials or make an appropriate starter. For more information see Chapter 6 of How to Brew and Appendix A of Brewing Classic Styles.

For complete brewing instructions, see our Brew Day: Step by Step guide.

Enjoy!

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SEE OUR OTHER RECIPES »

Kal

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Last edited by kal on Mon May 01, 2017 8:23 pm; edited 23 times in total
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drcraig



Joined: 04 May 2014
Posts: 32



PostLink    Posted: Fri Nov 07, 2014 5:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can't wait to try this, hopefully Sunday will be brew day. I'll try it with 1099 instead of 1056.

We just ran out of the London Pride clone from early this Summer and I need another session beer!

The half-New Zealand IPA clone is still going strong!
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drcraig



Joined: 04 May 2014
Posts: 32



PostLink    Posted: Tue Nov 25, 2014 10:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tasted the first semi-carbed sample today! We're on day 15 since the pitch, so still early. OG was 1.042, FG was 1.012. I did use 1099. I ended the dry hop at 6 days... perhaps a little too early. The color is a gorgeous light gold with nice clarity from the gelatin. Aromas in the glass are bright with the scent of green apples and tropical fruit, with maybe a little dank pine. Mouthfeel is great, very light body and obviously sessionable. It's on the dry side, but not too much. I wouldn't want it any drier than this. The flavor is grapefruity, citrusy, and with a little pine and a hint of sweetness. Bitterness is very subtle, but still present.

I'm tempted to add some hops to a teaball and throw that in the keg, but I worry this beer doesn't have the body to support more hops, plus any grassy/vegetable notes from Citra might become very noticeable.

Overall a very nice light but hoppy beer. I can't wait to see how it matures in a few weeks.
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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 7683
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Pale Ale (sessionable), Mild, NEIPA, Schwarzbier, Kölsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Saison


PostLink    Posted: Wed Nov 26, 2014 12:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for posting your thoughts on this one! 15 days after yeast pitch is indeed early but nothing wrong with trying and seeing how things change over time. I find 1 to 1.5 months or so in (after it's fully carb'ed and fully conditioned) it's better.

You're right about the dryness - I wouldn't want it any dryer either. Next time I may try with a little bit of carapils/carafoam to try and give it a bit more body. We'll see!

Let us know what you think after another 3-4 weeks.

Kal

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Dan Cook



Joined: 14 Jan 2015
Posts: 9
Location: Seattle


PostLink    Posted: Tue Feb 10, 2015 6:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kal,

If you're brewing a sessionable pale with the same basic recipe as The Electric Pale Ale (batch #130), and same target volume but with fewer hops and less malt, wouldn't you want to tone down the water treatment too. In particular I am thinking that the sulfate and calcium should come down, either in tandem so as to maintain the same ratio but fewer overall ions, or perhaps just bring down the Sulfate. The latter would give a more 'balanced' beer (i.e. less bitter), which would seem to be the goal of a session ale. Your batch #130 recipe calls for a ratio of 1:5.5 (Cl = 50, sulfate = 275). I am wondering if having a Sulfate concentration of 150ppm, therefore a ratio more like 1:3, would be better?
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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 7683
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Pale Ale (sessionable), Mild, NEIPA, Schwarzbier, Kölsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Saison


PostLink    Posted: Tue Feb 10, 2015 9:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Dan,

That's really a personal choice. I wouldn't do it myself, but you may certainly try both ways and see which you enjoy more. Many British beers are not overly hoppy but do have a lot higher sulphate levels than any of these beers I've posted recipes for. There's a wide range of what most people would fine acceptable with no clear "right" answer.

Kal

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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 7683
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Pale Ale (sessionable), Mild, NEIPA, Schwarzbier, Kölsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Saison


PostLink    Posted: Sat May 16, 2015 4:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

UPDATE:

I've tweaked this recipe slightly (see above) to have it finish at a slightly higher gravity (1.012 instead of 1.008) as I was finding it a tad dry for my tastes.

The biggest change is that the single infusion mash temperature was raised from 152F to 160F and I used a healthy dose of Carapils® or Carafoam®. This raises both the original gravity and final gravity as this malt produces mostly unfermentable sugars. The higher mash temperature helps ensure we end up at the target gravity we want (1.012), slightly higher than the 1.010 final gravity of our normal Electric Pale Ale. Too low and a beer can taste overly thin, a common problem with lower alcohol version of beers where nothing but the amount of malt is modified. When making lower ABV versions of your favourite beers you want to re-assess the percentages used in the grist.

This last batch I feel is perfect. This is going to be a staple beer that I plan on always having on tap. I find this 4.3% ABV session version is much more approachable than the regular 6.0% ABV version and it doesn't give up anything in terms of flavour. Don't get me wrong: I love the 6.0% version, but sometimes you want to have 2-3 and not feel the effects (as much).

Kal

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Last edited by kal on Mon Sep 07, 2015 1:45 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Dan Cook



Joined: 14 Jan 2015
Posts: 9
Location: Seattle


PostLink    Posted: Tue May 19, 2015 4:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kal wrote:
UPDATE:

I've tweaked this recipe slightly (see above) to have it finish at a slightly higher gravity (1.012 instead of 1.008) as I was finding it a tad dry for my tastes.

Kal


I've done a variation on Kal's sessionable recipe twice recently and it's been a big hit, especially as the season warms up. Pretty much the same hop schedule as Kal, and I also deliberately targeted FG/OG readings of about 1.045/1.012, but through different methods:

● grain bill = Maris Otter + Vienna + acidulated malt. No Crystal or Cara (and like Kal I use an elevated mash temp)
● a yeast strain with a lower attenuation, therefore a higher terminal gravity
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drcraig



Joined: 04 May 2014
Posts: 32



PostLink    Posted: Sat Jun 13, 2015 4:31 pm    Post subject: Base for a fruit beer Reply with quote

Any thoughts on why this base grain bill would or would not work for a fruit beer such as apricot or peach?
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 7683
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Pale Ale (sessionable), Mild, NEIPA, Schwarzbier, Kölsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Saison


PostLink    Posted: Sat Jun 13, 2015 8:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't see why not! That said, I've never made beer with fruit... good luck! Let us know how it turns out.

Kal

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drcraig



Joined: 04 May 2014
Posts: 32



PostLink    Posted: Sun Jun 14, 2015 12:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The light body of this beer seems like it would be ideal for showcasing additions other than hops, like fruit.

You know I STILL have this beer sitting in a keg in my keezer since November? It's nice and smooth, but the hoppiness has since dissipated. The dryness still reminds me to aim for a higher FG with the next attempt, and hopefully your adjustment will do the trick.

After I posted this it occurred to me that you have never written up a fruit beer recipe. I guess you're not a fan?

This past winter we were down in Clearwater and stopped by Dunedin Brewery. They have an absolutely stunning apricot peach beer that I'd like to clone. The only info they publish online is that it's 6% ABV. My first attempt at a clone was an extract batch using about 80% golden light and 20% wheat, with some crystal. I used 1098 yeast (because 1099 wasn't available, and I wanted something fruity). Hopping was minimal at about 13 IBU using Hallertau for bittering, and a single addition of 1 oz Galaxy at 5 min. I put one big can each of apricot and peach puree from VH in the secondary, and then cold crashed with gelatin 1 week later.

The result? Tart as F with obviously British fruitiness. The gelatin did not do much to clear it up, but I only waited two days before kegging. NOT what I wanted at all. I tried to save it with 1/2 lb of lactose in the keg, which has sweetened it up a bit, but it still tastes like an experiment gone wrong. I'm particularly annoyed I did't just use US-05 instead of the 1098.

I think I'm going to try again using a lighter malt base, like this one, perhaps with as much as 40% wheat, use Conan yeast (I saved a jar from a HT clone two weeks ago- attenuation was 75%), and STOP the fermentation in the secondary with K-sorbate or something prior to adding the fruit. I'm also going to keep the hops even simpler this time, noble for about 12-15 IBU max, no aroma. Let the fruit do that work.

I'm curious as to your opinion on a water profile for a beer like this. I went with straight RO water the first time around, but the beer has kind of a "dead" mouthfeel, which I think may be due to lack of salts.
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 7683
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Pale Ale (sessionable), Mild, NEIPA, Schwarzbier, Kölsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Saison


PostLink    Posted: Sun Jun 14, 2015 2:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

drcraig wrote:
After I posted this it occurred to me that you have never written up a fruit beer recipe. I guess you're not a fan?

I wouldn't say I'm not a fan (there aren't really any styles I don't like), just that there are other beers I'll reach for first so I've never been interested in brewing a beer with fruit myself.

Quote:
I'm curious as to your opinion on a water profile for a beer like this. I went with straight RO water the first time around, but the beer has kind of a "dead" mouthfeel, which I think may be due to lack of salts.

I really don't know what the right approach would be. If I had to guess, I'd go with something basic that I do for most of my non-hoppy beers: Ca=50, Mg=10, Na=16, Cl=71, S04=69
But that's just me guessing. I have no idea what the fruit would do or how to approach it. More research would be required. I'd suggest you start a new thread about it. Good luck!

Kal

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Topdollar



Joined: 20 Aug 2015
Posts: 63



PostLink    Posted: Sat Jun 18, 2016 4:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Brewed this May 28th and have been enjoying it for the past three days. Everything worked perfect with this beer (with the exception of one bum pack of us-05 that didn't take off...another pitch sprinkled on top fixed that).

Probably my favorite of all the beers I've made from the site so far Kal. I did use a hop screen in the boil kettle - I noticed the hops there didn't get agitated as much through the boil, but whether this affected the bitterness..I'm not sure.

Either way, first time I crash chilled by putting the conicals right in the keezer. Can't get over how much I like it and how clear it is.

Tackling the Double Citra IPA next!




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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 7683
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Pale Ale (sessionable), Mild, NEIPA, Schwarzbier, Kölsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Saison


PostLink    Posted: Sat Jun 18, 2016 1:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Topdollar wrote:
Probably my favorite of all the beers I've made from the site so far Kal.

I'm glad to hear that! It's definitely one of my favourites as well and is always on tap now as guests like it too (actually on 2 taps: The basement bar as well as the sunroom kegerator).

Kal

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Walts Malt



Joined: 27 Sep 2013
Posts: 63
Location: Farmington, MN


PostLink    Posted: Tue Oct 04, 2016 12:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just got this beer on tap at home and I really like it. I did not use any gelatin and it's a bit cloudy. Going forward I will probably start to use gelatin where appropriate in my beers. I was wondering though if there are any other points in the process that I should be a little more careful with to help get clearer beer. I did use a whirlfloc tablet at 15 minutes.
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 7683
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Pale Ale (sessionable), Mild, NEIPA, Schwarzbier, Kölsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Saison


PostLink    Posted: Tue Oct 04, 2016 12:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How long's it been in the keg?

For what it's worth, I don't use gelatin much anymore for my hoppy beers. This one I will dry hop in the primary near the end of fermentation then go straight in the keg. After 2 weeks it's settled out. So other than Whirlfloc I don't use anything else.

Kal

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Walts Malt



Joined: 27 Sep 2013
Posts: 63
Location: Farmington, MN


PostLink    Posted: Tue Oct 04, 2016 1:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

About two weeks, but I did dry hop it at room temperature. Just moved into serving chest freezer on Friday night. Based on what you said, we'll see how it clears up over the next couple of weeks. Still tastes great, just the geek in me wants the appearance aspect as well.
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 7683
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Pale Ale (sessionable), Mild, NEIPA, Schwarzbier, Kölsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Saison


PostLink    Posted: Tue Oct 04, 2016 1:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you just chilled it a couple of days ago for the first time you likely have chill haze. It'll go away.

Kal

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dward4421



Joined: 21 Jan 2016
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PostLink    Posted: Sat Oct 22, 2016 12:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I saw the update on facebook about tweaking the recipe to make this more like the "New England IPA" style. I know you will not make too many changes at once, but will you still be sticking with the us-05 initially or will you use an English strain? Once my panel arrives in the upcoming weeks, I'm sure this will be the first recipe I attempt!
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 7683
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Pale Ale (sessionable), Mild, NEIPA, Schwarzbier, Kölsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Saison


PostLink    Posted: Sat Oct 22, 2016 2:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dward4421 wrote:
I saw the update on facebook about tweaking the recipe to make this more like the "New England IPA" style. I know you will not make too many changes at once, but will you still be sticking with the us-05 initially or will you use an English strain? Once my panel arrives in the upcoming weeks, I'm sure this will be the first recipe I attempt!

The first change was only water adjustments as I mentioned on the Facebook post. It's not even where I expect the water adjustment to eventually be, but I want to take baby steps as I want to learn and compare the differences. Its happily bubbling away now. Wink

In the next month or two I do want to make a full blown NEIPA with different yeast (likely English like you mentioned) ", water, malt bill, hops (lots of fruity ones like Amarillo, Citra, galaxy, mosaic, etc).

Good luck!

Kal

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