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Bohemian Pilsner
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9511
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, English IPA, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter, Saison

Working on: Kölsch


PostLink    Posted: Thu Jul 04, 2013 9:01 pm    Post subject: Bohemian Pilsner Reply with quote


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Pilsner Urquell. Photo (c) emdgroup.com

Pilsner is a style of lager that originated in Plzen (pronounced Pilsen), Czechoslovakia in 1842.

Prior to that time, most beers were made with top-fermenting yeast and were dark in colour and somewhat hazy. In 1842, the Pilsner Urquell Brewery used a ground-breaking technique of methodical bottom fermenting with a new strain of yeast. The resulting brew, Pilsner, was a refreshing golden and bright beer that has now been adopted by breweries all over the world.

Today various styles of Pilsner beer exist such that the original is now referred to Bohemian Pilsner, or simply Bo Pils.


Pilsner Urquell brewery in Plzeň. Photo (c) aecom.com

Over the years most big breweries have changed public perception towards pilsners by brewing watered down representations of the original classic.

Unlike these big brewery commercial representations, this Bohemian Pilsner is a medium-bodied beer has a rich, grainy malt flavour (from the Pilsner malt) that is complimented by a spicy and floral hop character (from the Czech Saaz hops).

Softer water (low in minerals) is required to brew a true Bohemian Pilsner. While hard water accentuates up-front hop-bitterness, soft water suppresses it. Because of the soft water, the bitterness is rounded, not rough, in spite of the relatively high hop loading. If your water is high in minerals, try cutting it with reverse osmosis (or distilled) water to reach the target numbers outlined in the recipe below. 50% reverse osmosis (or distilled) water reduces the mineral counts by half.

Brew up a batch and let me know how you like it!

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Bohemian Pilsner

Size: 12.0 US gal (post-boil @ 68F)
Mash Efficiency: 95.0%
Attenuation: 74.6%
Calories: 180 kcal per 12.0 fl oz

Original Gravity: 1.054 (style range: 1.044 - 1.056)
Terminal Gravity: 1.014 (style range: 1.013 - 1.017)
Color: 3.5 (style range: 3.5 - 6.0)
Alcohol: 5.3% (style range: 4.2% - 5.4%)
Bitterness: 39 (style range: 35.0 - 45.0)

Ingredients:
19.0 lb Weyermann Pilsner Malt (94.1%)
1.2 lb Carapils®/Carafoam® (5.9%)
6.0 oz Czech Saaz Hops (2.6%) - added during boil, boiled 60 min [24.3 IBU]
4.0 oz Czech Saaz Hops (2.6%) - added during boil, boiled 30 min [11.7 IBU]
1 Whirlfloc Tablet (Irish moss) - added during boil, boiled 15 min
2.0 oz Czech Saaz Hops (2.6%) - added during boil, boiled 10 min [3.3 IBU]
2.0 oz Czech Saaz Hops (2.6%) - added during boil, boiled 0 min
8 packs Wyeast 2001 Urquell Lager liquid yeast (or an appropriate starter*)
- OR -
8 vials White Labs WLP800 Pilsner Lager liquid yeast (or an appropriate starter*)

Notes:
Add 500mg potassium metabisulphite to 20 gallons water to remove chlorine/chloramine (as required).
Water treated with brewing salts to: Ca=21, Mg=5, Na=18, Cl=16, S04=21
(Randy Mosher's ideal Pale Lager numbers. Just enough ions to acidify the mash while keeping the water soft).
For complete details on how to adjust your water, refer to our step by step Water Adjustments guide.
1.5 qt/lb mash thickness. Single infusion mash at 154F for 90 mins. Mashout to 168F.
If your system allows it (such as ours), consider mashing in in the low 120's for a short protein rest and immediately start ramping up to the starch conversion/saccharification rest of 154F.
60-90 min fly sparge with ~6 pH water. Collect 14.9 gallons in the boil kettle.
Boil for 90 minutes. Lid on at flameout, start chilling immediately.
Cool wort to 53F and aerate well. Ferment at 53F until approximately 2-5 points from final gravity, then raise the temperature to 65F and keep it there for 2-4 days to reduce diacetyl (a buttery flavour produced by some yeasts).
Rack to CO2 purged brite tank (secondary), crash chill to near freezing (if possible), add 1 tsp of unflavoured gelatin dissolved in a cup of hot distilled water per 5 gallons of beer, and let clear for 2-3 days.
Package as you would normally. I keg and carbonate at around 2.5 volumes of C02. The beer will improve greatly if kept near freezing for 1-2 months before serving. I use a lagering/conditioning fridge that holds 6 kegs, set to just above freezing that holds a small 5 pound CO2 tank so that the kegs can condition and carbonate at the same time.

*For hints on how to make a starter see Chapter 6 of How to Brew and Appendix A of Brewing Classic Styles. Also see the stirplate/starter equipment I use.

For complete brewing instructions, see our Brew Day: Step by Step guide.

Enjoy!

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SEE OUR OTHER RECIPES »

Kal

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Last edited by kal on Sun Aug 05, 2018 10:09 pm; edited 26 times in total
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Castermmt



Joined: 03 Jan 2011
Posts: 864
Location: Lowell, In

Drinking: Steelhead Porter, Alt-Toids, Hefty-Weizen, Terry's Kolsch, African Amber, Pumpkin Ale, Double Dog Ale

Working on: Janet's Brown Ale, Terry's Kolsch, Pilsner


PostLink    Posted: Sat Jul 06, 2013 2:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kal, any chance you can post the file for the recipes? I use "Beersmith 2" and have started using Brewersfriend, both have scaling capabilities that would make it a lot easier to convert the recipes for individual systems. Beersmith can read .BSM and Beer XML files, Brewersfriend can do XML, I noticed your using Beertools pro and it saves as .xml as well.

Thanks, Castermmt

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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9511
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, English IPA, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter, Saison

Working on: Kölsch


PostLink    Posted: Sat Jul 06, 2013 2:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

All my recipes are .BTP (Beer Tools Pro) format. I see no option to save as XML (just tried). Mine also have a lot of other 'junk' in them and contain system specific stuff like boil off rate, and so on...

I think it's probably better that people start with a clean slate (or another recipe with all their regular parameters already included) and then just add the ingredients. This way you're not overlooking something and keeping one of my settings by mistake. Should only take 2 minutes to drag and drop the few things that go into recipes. You always need to make changes anyway given that efficiencies will be different, hop AA will be different, etc. The only things important really are the "core" pieces of information which are:

Add these two until you reach the starting gravity specified for your setup's efficiency:
94.1% Weyermann Pilsner malt
5.9% Carapils®/Carafoam®

Then add hops at the following times to reach these numbers:

Czech Saaz @ 60 min for ~24.3 IBU
Czech Saaz Hops (@ 30 min for ~11.7 IBU
Czech Saaz Hops @ 10 min for 3.3 IBU
Czech Saaz Hops @ 0 min
Wyeast 2001 Urquell or White Labs WLP-800 Pilsner Lager

I've been tempted to remove all amounts from the recipes and just go with percentages since that's all that matters...

Kal

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Castermmt



Joined: 03 Jan 2011
Posts: 864
Location: Lowell, In

Drinking: Steelhead Porter, Alt-Toids, Hefty-Weizen, Terry's Kolsch, African Amber, Pumpkin Ale, Double Dog Ale

Working on: Janet's Brown Ale, Terry's Kolsch, Pilsner


PostLink    Posted: Sat Jul 06, 2013 4:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That works. Thanks, Castermmt
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OkieDokie



Joined: 31 Aug 2013
Posts: 187
Location: Oklahoma

Drinking: Electric ale, Weizen

Working on: Electric lager, American Amber Ale, Dirty Blonde


PostLink    Posted: Tue Dec 31, 2013 4:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a quick question about the fermentation part of this recipe. I would guess it would be pretty standard for lagers also. When it says to ferment at 53 and then raise the temp for a few days for a rest, it then says it's best to lager near freezing for 1-2 months. Would you just leave it in the primary near freezing for those months and then add gelatin and keg it, or do you have to transfer it to another vessel and take it off the yeast before the layering period?
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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9511
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, English IPA, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter, Saison

Working on: Kölsch


PostLink    Posted: Tue Dec 31, 2013 4:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can do either. Technically speaking, it's more correct to lager while the beer's still on the yeast. Keep it there for 2 months near freezing as it helps with the cleanup. Then rack to a brite tank before adding gelatine so that the gelatine has less work to do, hold it still at near freezing for 2-3 days for it to clear, then keg and continue to keep cold at near freezing until you're ready to serve. Generally speaking it's not great to go up/down in temp a lot after packaging. Beer doesn't like that.

Now I don't do exactly that. Wink

After the fermentation and rest is done, I rack off into my 5 gallon "brite tank" glass carboy, add the gelatine, and wait 2-3 days before kegging. The wort rises to room temp during this time - gelatine technically works better at lower temps but I've found room temp to be fine. Always results in a crystal clear beer for me.

I then keg, and then place in my conditioning/lagering fridge set to ~32F to lager for ~2 months at near freezing. I do it this way as it's easier for me to lager in a keg in my 6-keg fridge than to lager in the 5-gallon carboys (brite tanks).

I've been very happy with the results. Part of the reason this works well is because when I do the rest after most of the fermentation is done, I leave the beer on the yeast for a good week (sometimes two) before racking. I want it to be on the yeast for about a week without the gravity changing.

Good luck!

Kal

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DIBS



Joined: 18 Mar 2013
Posts: 24
Location: Slave Lake


PostLink    Posted: Fri Jul 11, 2014 2:43 pm    Post subject: yeast. Reply with quote

Hey guys,

I finally got around to making this lager, it looks yummy. Very easy to make too. I pitched my yeast about a week before, in a 2L starter as my yeast was a little old. Then I cold crashed it and decanted it, i think i may have messed up my decant, I poured it out instead of siphoning. But my question is, since this is my first lager, how long should it take the yeast to start going nuts? I pitched yesterday around 3:30Pm MST, and it is now 8:43 Am MST, and it looks like nothing is happening. Am i being too antsy? I know it takes 1-2 months, so just set me straight please. Thanks
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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9511
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, English IPA, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter, Saison

Working on: Kölsch


PostLink    Posted: Fri Jul 11, 2014 3:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If the wort's at the recommended low (52-53F) temp then things are really slooooow to get started and slow to show much of any action. The yeast will never go nuts and can take a good couple of days before showing any signs of activity.

Kal

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Super SS



Joined: 03 Feb 2014
Posts: 1
Location: Perth, Western Australia


PostLink    Posted: Tue Nov 18, 2014 12:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kal wrote:
You can do either. Technically speaking, it's more correct to lager while the beer's still on the yeast. Keep it there for 2 months near freezing as it helps with the cleanup. Then rack to a brite tank before adding gelatine so that the gelatine has less work to do, hold it still at near freezing for 2-3 days for it to clear, then keg and continue to keep cold at near freezing until you're ready to serve. Generally speaking it's not great to go up/down in temp a lot after packaging. Beer doesn't like that.

Now I don't do exactly that. Wink

After the fermentation and rest is done, I rack off into my 5 gallon "brite tank" glass carboy, add the gelatine, and wait 2-3 days before kegging. The wort rises to room temp during this time - gelatine technically works better at lower temps but I've found room temp to be fine. Always results in a crystal clear beer for me.

I then keg, and then place in my conditioning/lagering fridge set to ~32F to lager for ~2 months at near freezing. I do it this way as it's easier for me to lager in a keg in my 6-keg fridge than to lager in the 5-gallon carboys (brite tanks).

I've been very happy with the results. Part of the reason this works well is because when I do the rest after most of the fermentation is done, I leave the beer on the yeast for a good week (sometimes two) before racking. I want it to be on the yeast for about a week without the gravity changing.

Good luck!

Kal


Hi Kal

Do you leave the beer at the rest of 65F for the 1 - 2 weeks after fermentation is complete or only for 2 - 4 days then drop it back down?
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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9511
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, English IPA, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter, Saison

Working on: Kölsch


PostLink    Posted: Tue Nov 18, 2014 12:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Only 2-4 days.

From the recipe:

"Ferment at 53F until approximately 2-5 points from final gravity, then raise the temperature to 65F keep it there for 2-4 days to reduce diacetyl (a buttery flavour produced by some yeasts)."

Kal

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captacl



Joined: 30 Sep 2014
Posts: 37
Location: Bethlehem, PA USA


PostLink    Posted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 3:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think I may have a fermentation issue with this one. I haven't used a hydrometer to verify but I took a refractometer reading and it looks like the gravity only dropped to 8.9 Brix which according to beersmith equates to 1.025. If that's the case I think its a bit high. I probably could just let it go and see how it tastes after lagering. I seriously doubt I under pitched the yeast. I did a two stage starter that according to www.yeastcalculator.com should have been enough yeast for this batch. I even ended up with only 4.75gal into the fermenter instead of 5.5 gal so I would of had an even higher pitch rate then planned. I took the recommendation from the Brewing Classic Styles book and dropped the wort to 44 a then pitched the starter. Over two days I had the controller slowly bring the temp up to 54 and let it finish fermenting at that temp. He claims this eliminates the need for a diacetyl rest. This was brewed on 1/7 so its been 18 days. Is it worth the trouble and expense to through another smack pack of Wyeast in or should I just move on.

I was thinking if I just move on should I crash chill without gelatin so there is some yeast remaining to clean up the beer further or will that not make a difference. I would then transfer from the conical to the keg and lager it for a while. I would then add the gelatin to the keg before I go to carb it up for about a week before serving. The first pour would be probably be cloudy but I am ok with that. Any thoughts?

Anthony
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Castermmt



Joined: 03 Jan 2011
Posts: 864
Location: Lowell, In

Drinking: Steelhead Porter, Alt-Toids, Hefty-Weizen, Terry's Kolsch, African Amber, Pumpkin Ale, Double Dog Ale

Working on: Janet's Brown Ale, Terry's Kolsch, Pilsner


PostLink    Posted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 12:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Did you do the 2-4 days @ 65f diacetyl rest? This will drop the FG as well .
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captacl



Joined: 30 Sep 2014
Posts: 37
Location: Bethlehem, PA USA


PostLink    Posted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 2:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I did not do the diacetyl rest since I was was following the procedure mentioned in brewing classic styles. It's probably to late to do that now right?
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Tungsten



Joined: 06 Dec 2014
Posts: 316
Location: Buffalo, NY


PostLink    Posted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 2:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't see why it would be too late to try it - it shouldn't hurt the beer at all. Maybe it's too early and coffee hasn't hit my brain yet, but I think the worst case scenario is "nothing happens" and maybe you end up with a buttery beer.

You do need to measure with a hydrometer though. A refractometer reading is going to be distorted by the alcohol present in the beer and cause an incorrect (upward) swing in your gravity rating. You measured 8.9 brix... but if I use one of the refractometer correction calculators out there, that really means like 1.020, not 1.025, which puts you closer to the "ballpark."
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captacl



Joined: 30 Sep 2014
Posts: 37
Location: Bethlehem, PA USA


PostLink    Posted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 2:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes I know the refractometer readings are wildly sewed with alcohol present. Since I don't have much beer to waste with this batch I was just going to take 1 hydrometer reading right before kegging.
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Tungsten



Joined: 06 Dec 2014
Posts: 316
Location: Buffalo, NY


PostLink    Posted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 2:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gotcha.

Still, I would try increasing the temperature up for a few days. It can't hurt, but it might help.
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Castermmt



Joined: 03 Jan 2011
Posts: 864
Location: Lowell, In

Drinking: Steelhead Porter, Alt-Toids, Hefty-Weizen, Terry's Kolsch, African Amber, Pumpkin Ale, Double Dog Ale

Working on: Janet's Brown Ale, Terry's Kolsch, Pilsner


PostLink    Posted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 4:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The vote is in, Kick it up to 65F and let the yeast finish their job!!! Drunk
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Castermmt



Joined: 03 Jan 2011
Posts: 864
Location: Lowell, In

Drinking: Steelhead Porter, Alt-Toids, Hefty-Weizen, Terry's Kolsch, African Amber, Pumpkin Ale, Double Dog Ale

Working on: Janet's Brown Ale, Terry's Kolsch, Pilsner


PostLink    Posted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 4:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

All lagers I've ever brewed, I used the diacetyl rest to ensure the yeast cleaned up the buttery diacetyl off flavor. It can't hurt.
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captacl



Joined: 30 Sep 2014
Posts: 37
Location: Bethlehem, PA USA


PostLink    Posted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 7:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Typical, I think I may have panicked for no reason. I am guessing I didn't take enough of a sample to clear out the racking arm in the conical. I just took another small sample and it measured at 7.0 which beersmith is putting at 1.013 on the SG. Didn't taste much of a buttery aftertaste either. The sample looked completely different and tasted completely different as well. Because I started the fermentation at only 44 degrees I probably don't need the diacetyl rest after all. Since I already set the controller for it I will let it rise to 64 for a couple days and just crash chill it. One of these days I will learn to relax and stop panicking.
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blazinlow86



Joined: 15 Jan 2017
Posts: 101
Location: vancouver bc


PostLink    Posted: Tue Aug 01, 2017 3:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

brewed a 12 gal batch yesterday. system worked FLAWLESS as usual. pitched a decanted 9 litre starter of wlp800 and aerated with pure 02 and its bubbling away 24 hours later at 53f . thanks kal
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