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Kal's basement Brewery/Bar/Home Theatre build 2.0
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10077
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Cali Common, Maibock, Helles, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Weizen


PostLink    Posted: Wed May 09, 2012 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote


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wubears71 wrote:
Good idea on moving the duct work. I know I would have regretted not doing it even years after the completion.

Agreed. I asked the builder for costs to have it moved or flattened out but it's basically impossible as this is not a custom home but a track build (there are only two builders in the neighbourhood) so the plans are already 100% done. Any changes have massive ripple effects and they're just not set up to handle it.

I knew this going in so no surprise. I also knew that we could always redo the duct work down the road as the basement was being designed. In a way it's probably better doing it later as I'm sure a bunch of stuff would have been moved anyway.

My major initial concern was what the actual 4x4 drop was for. I assumed it had to be a duct transition but given that the model home had a 100% finished basement it was hard to be sure. I couldn't take a look. The builder couldn't confirm 100% either. So I ended up walking the neighbourhood using Google Street View looking for similar model homes, wrote down the addresses, reverse looked up the phone numbers and (politely) called them up explaning my situation asking if it would be possible to look in their basement for 5 minutes. Our model was a actually brand new so there was only one other in the neighbourhood. Luckily they were nice enough to let me in and I was able to confirm that it was a supply duct transfer under an I-beam as I expected:



I had no idea how we'd re-route it but at least I knew it was likely possible.

This other homeowner with the same model actually had a completely finished basement too but they didn't bother framing and drywalling around the 4x4' drop. They just painted the duct white to match the ceiling and framed as close as possible around it. Wink

Kal

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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10077
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Cali Common, Maibock, Helles, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Weizen


PostLink    Posted: Mon May 14, 2012 12:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Most of the ductwork has now been relocated (just waiting on a plumber so that some lines can be moved to finish off the HVAC). I'll post some new pictures once it's complete.

Wall framing starts today.

I spent a good 4-5 hours doing something that is probably pretty useless this past weekend: Taping the all of the new ducts with foil tape where the pieces meet to stop air leaks.

One the energy saving features the house builder touts is "Sealed air ducts in basement". All of the ducts that we tore out had been previously sealed. The HVAC guys don't normally do this so I did it. I can see now why they don't normally do this. It's a pain in the arse. Wink

Some will argue that leaky ducts create a number of potential problems such as contributing to the growth of mold and mildew and can also waste energy dollars. Not sure how much of an issue it would be here but I felt for about $40 worth of tape and just a bunch of work on my part that it was worth it. It was a pain to do as in some places they've really put things in tight to get it all to fit.

Of course, with a sealed ceiling/bulkheads that's been stuffed full of insulation, I don't see the energy savings as being as beneficial as before when the ducts were completely exposed. Air is less likely to flow out from cracks in the ducts as the area around the ducts in the ceiling/bulkheads will be filled & closed. I can certainly see the benefit in an unfinished basement.

Kal

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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10077
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Cali Common, Maibock, Helles, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Weizen


PostLink    Posted: Mon May 14, 2012 6:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Note: Ordering the products listed below (or any other product) using our links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!

-------------

I spent some time yesterday figuring out how the brewery vent hood I already have will have to be modified to have it vent out the top instead of the side (since the brewery is changing). Now I just need to find a stainless steel shop to do the work:




Christmas came early today! The order from Micromatic arrived:



I knew the boxes would be big, but I wasn't prepared for how big. The wide angle lens on the camera is deceptive. The larger box on the right is nearly 4 feet long.

The 8-tap tower was well packaged and protected (spray foam is used to conform to the shape of the product):







The product lines are all stainless, the glycol lines are copper. Both have barbed ends that have been welded on:



Trunk line (8 product lines + 2 glycol lines): (Link to product details)




Glycol only trunk line:


Drip tray with integrated glass rinser:



Stout faucets:



Inside the black shaft you can see the little restrictor plate with tiny holes. The beer is pushed through this plate which knocks out carbonation creating that nice creamy thick head that goes well with certain beer styles, Guiness of course being the most well known:



Two of the taps will be stout faucets for serving with C02/Nitrogen blend, the other 6 will be Perlick style taps served with straight C02.

It's starting to feel a lot more real now that things are starting to arrive...

-----------

Note: Ordering the products listed above (or any other product) using our links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!

Kal

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Last edited by kal on Wed Oct 02, 2019 3:23 pm; edited 11 times in total
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wubears71



Joined: 14 Mar 2012
Posts: 278
Location: Webster Groves, MO

Drinking: Keg 1- Hefenweizen, Keg 2- Vanilla Scotch Porter, Keg 3-Munich Helles

Working on: Stinky IPA


PostLink    Posted: Mon May 14, 2012 6:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Neat. I always wondered what was special about stout faucets other than their shape. Now I know.
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rockinmarty



Joined: 01 Jan 2012
Posts: 15
Location: st-hubert, Qc


PostLink    Posted: Mon May 14, 2012 8:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

it's beginning to feel a lot like X-mas. If it wasn't that warm and sunny out. I'd be doubting myself. Very nice Kal, can't wait to see the rest.
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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10077
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Cali Common, Maibock, Helles, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Weizen


PostLink    Posted: Tue May 15, 2012 1:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The form was removed from the shower area:



The lower part will be used to slope the floor towards the drain.

Most of the ducts have now been re-routed.
Below is a view from the first row of home theater seats towards the location where the screen wall will eventually be:



The screen wall will be in front of the big fat duct that drops the lowest. All that ductwork will be in the room behind the screen. You can start to make out how the left/right bulkheads will be laid out. (The door and walls to the left will eventually be removed too, widening the whole area - it's kept up now to keep noise out).

Some of it looks like something out of a 70's sci-fi movie:



Re-routing the supply duct in and around the bathroom:





Not much to really look at now and wrap your head around but it's getting there.

Some water lines were moved today by the plumber so that the ductwork can be finished tomorrow.
The subfloor for the bathroom/sauna/DVD storage area will start tomorrow along with some initial framing work.

Kal

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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10077
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Cali Common, Maibock, Helles, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Weizen


PostLink    Posted: Fri May 18, 2012 2:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interior framing as has started and the small room/landing with a door at the bottom of the stairs has been removed:



The screen wall is 12 feet wide to accommodate my existing 8 foot wide screen and speakers on the left and right.

In an ideal world I would have preferred an 14-15 foot wide screen wall to give the speakers more room to breath (and/or allow a possibly larger future constant image height 2:35:1 ratio screen) but there simply isn't room in this basement for something that wide with two rows of seating if I keep my current screen due to the centralized nature of the staircase in this house.

There's room *behind* the screen which could allow me to do an accoustically transparent screen in the future. With the speakers behind the screen, I'd be able to easily go to 10 feet wide. For now I'm trying to keep the number of major changes to a minimum as there's enough to worry about.

The wall between the bar & brewery with framing for the door has been done:



There's still framing work to do for the windows between the two.

The rest of the subfloor for the DVD storage area, bathroom, and sauna is now complete:



Plywood (the lighter coloured stuff) is used where tile will be installed, and OSB (oriented strand board - darker coloured stuff) is used where carpet/underpad will be installed. Tile glue doesn't tend to stick as well to OSB hence the difference though some installers say it doesn't really matter. My understanding is that it's really only important to use plywood for tile if there will be foot traffic.

So why not install plywood everywhere? OSB's cheaper than plywood, so it's used first if possible. That said, they ran out of OSB and installed plywood is a few spots (like this room that's going behind the screen). It's cheaper to use plywood if you have an extra sheet than to run someone off to the store to get one extra sheet of OSB when you're paying people by the hour. Wink

Labour cost for most parts of projects like this is everything. It's not uncommon to pay a plumber $500 to come and lay $50 worth of pipe, or to pay an electrician $300 to install $30 worth of outlets and wiring. This is completely normal. You're paying a skilled trade for their knowledge and experience, not for the value of the parts installed. The cost of materials spent is not relevant.

Going back to the bar, there's going to be a niche with shelves and a linear wine rack installed on the side wall. Some the framing was started today:



We actually ended up switching places with the niche and wine racks as it meant not having to move the waste water stack (the big black vertical pipe in the picture above). Moving it would have meant jackhammering the floor, redoing the plumbing, and then pouring new concrete. Sometimes simple changes can save a lot of money...

Here's an example of what is meant by linear wine racks - they're bottles that run from floor the ceiling and are positioned sideways:



We've got room for about 3-4 rows floor to ceiling. The ones we're interested in are VintageView Wine Racks. They're reasonably priced and a lot cheaper than typical wine racks. They're also more modern than your typical wood wine rack which is in line with the style of what we want to go with.

The name of the game so far with this renovation/build has been "tight". Getting things to fit right has often been a matter of inches.

You can only go so far with architectural drawings as well. At the end of the day you need to dig in and start building and see how it all fits:

Some examples of the tight fits:





Kal

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Last edited by kal on Wed Jan 07, 2015 3:36 pm; edited 1 time in total
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wubears71



Joined: 14 Mar 2012
Posts: 278
Location: Webster Groves, MO

Drinking: Keg 1- Hefenweizen, Keg 2- Vanilla Scotch Porter, Keg 3-Munich Helles

Working on: Stinky IPA


PostLink    Posted: Fri May 18, 2012 11:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looking great. I like linear wine racks. Are you using the same projector in the home theater?

Try doing work in a 97 year old house. You want to talk about making changes on the fly. The only given is nothing standard fits.

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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10077
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Cali Common, Maibock, Helles, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Weizen


PostLink    Posted: Fri May 18, 2012 12:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nope! A digital projector. Most likely a JVC RS45 or RS55. Still trying to decide between the two and it'll likely depend on what's left over after we stop hemorrhaging money. Wink

All the other HT equipment will stay the same (for now). I'll be pulling wires to put an extra couple of rear speakers but those won't be installed for some time (if ever) as I'd also need more amps, a different pre-amp, etc. There's a huge domino effect. I'm long due an upgrade but we can't do everything at once. The projector was the logical choice for now.

(My previous HT can be seen here).

Kal

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VaWineSnob



Joined: 14 Jun 2011
Posts: 88



PostLink    Posted: Fri May 18, 2012 2:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

On my house, the plumber used wood wedges to hold copper pipe in place until everything was soldered. I think he must have forgot to remove one wedge, whenever hot water is used in my son's bathroom I hear load clicking noise. I'm sure it's when the hot water pipe expanding as it heats up and then shrinking as it cools and the pipe rubbing against a wedge.

Moral of the story, make sure you back check tight framing and other conditions around ducts and pipe. In my case, the pipe is right next to my home theater area and it drives me nuts!
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tarponteaser



Joined: 28 Jul 2011
Posts: 74
Location: Indialantic, Florida


PostLink    Posted: Fri May 18, 2012 2:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looks like you are making good progress Kal, can't wait to see the finished project! We have another contractor comimg over today to review plans and bid on the 'minor' addition we have planned to expand the masterbedroom/bath. Nothing as fancy in scope as yours, but the wife will finally get her walk in closet and spa tub, and I'll get the home office and a reading area in the master bedroom.

Somehow, the plans for the semi enclosed veranda with 50 amp service and water/sewer didn't make the cut when we finalized the plans. No worries...if the wife is happy with the addition I can build my electric brewery in teh shed as originally planned.
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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10077
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Cali Common, Maibock, Helles, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Weizen


PostLink    Posted: Fri May 18, 2012 6:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

VaWineSnob wrote:
Moral of the story, make sure you back check tight framing and other conditions around ducts and pipe. In my case, the pipe is right next to my home theater area and it drives me nuts!

Good point. I have a list a mile long of things to not forget to check before drywall goes up. I've now added to check for any temporary bracing that may have been left behind, and double check that any tight spots such as HVAC are not rubbing or touching framing to avoid any noise transfer.

The list is mostly just to double check all the things that are going to covered up and make sure they still work, especially the things that are not used every day. It's really easy for a trade to nick or break a wire and not even know in some cases.

Here's the complete list if anyone's curious of the things I'll be checking immediately before drywall goes in:

- All outlets in entire house work.
- All phone plugs in entire house work.
- All coax/TV outlets work.
- x2 central vac extensions added.
- 2 x CAT6 lines from A/V rack to family room pulled? (for an HDMI extender)
- 1 x CAT5 line from A/V rack to family room pulled? (for IR extender)
- All speaker wires pulled (7.1 x 2 for bi-wiring)
- Motion sensor wire in place/exposed?
- P-trap for powder room vanity glued permanently shut?
- Trap doors installed or locations marked for: (1) Backyard hose bib, kitchen fridge water shutoff, 2xstack cleanouts.
- 2 x smoke / C02 detectors moved & still work?
- All alarm system zones throughout house still work?
- A/C works?
- family room fireplace works? (wall switch works?)
- internet works?
- basement bathroom fan works? Exhaust duct not blocked/crimped?
- CAT5 or POTS line to light switch(es) for IR control pulled. (Pull an extra to a double gang box for future expansion).
- Coax (RG6/3GHz) pulled from head-end to A/V rack for PVR.
- Furnace shutoff moved
- conduit to attic with pull line extended.

And added today!:

- Check/remove for any remaining temp bracing.
- Check that tight spots are not rubbing, especially HVAC not touching studs (furnace noise transmission into room)

Kal

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foomench



Joined: 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 710
Location: Longmont, CO

Drinking: Pinot barrel aged quad

Working on: Flanders oude bruin in barrel, Flanders red fermenting to refill the barrel


PostLink    Posted: Fri May 18, 2012 10:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice progress and list. I'll need to make one as well, as I see some familiar items there. Nice wine racks too, but those won't cut it for me in terms of space efficiency. I'm planning on building a two stage walk-in cooler for beer and wine. I have kegs and many bottles of beer, and 500+ bottles of wine. I'm hoping the wine doesn't have to be stored two bottles deep, but that may be necessary to fit it all in the space available.
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10077
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Cali Common, Maibock, Helles, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Weizen


PostLink    Posted: Sat May 19, 2012 12:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

foomench wrote:
Nice progress and list. I'll need to make one as well, as I see some familiar items there. Nice wine racks too, but those won't cut it for me in terms of space efficiency. I'm planning on building a two stage walk-in cooler for beer and wine. I have kegs and many bottles of beer, and 500+ bottles of wine. I'm hoping the wine doesn't have to be stored two bottles deep, but that may be necessary to fit it all in the space available.

You can get the linear wine racks as 2 or 3 deep as well, but we're just doing one deep. It's more for show than storage really. I had room for 300-400 bottles at the old house in my brewery room using shelves I built myself, but I no longer make wine anymore so no need for some much room.

Here's the old wine storage:



You'll definitely need 2-stage (2 temp) if it's for beer and wine since wine likes it warmer than beer.

Kal

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Spec



Joined: 15 May 2011
Posts: 31



PostLink    Posted: Sat May 19, 2012 7:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I haven't posted for a bit but those pictures were enough for me to have to say "holy sh*t I'm jealous."
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Magic City



Joined: 23 Sep 2011
Posts: 15



PostLink    Posted: Tue May 22, 2012 6:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kal, sorry if I missed this and it was somewhere earlier in the post, what's the part number on that drip tray with the glass washer? I can only seem to find the micromatic ones with the water jet in the middle, I like yours being offset to the side.

EDIT: And I just realized that there was a hyperlink above the pic. Whoops!
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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10077
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Cali Common, Maibock, Helles, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Weizen


PostLink    Posted: Tue May 22, 2012 6:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Magic City wrote:
Kal, sorry if I missed this and it was somewhere earlier in the post, what's the part number on that drip tray with the glass washer? I can only seem to find the micromatic ones with the water jet in the middle, I like yours being offset to the side.


Here's a link (helps support our site at no extra cost to you): http://www.micromatic.com/draft-keg-beer/drip-trays-pid-DP-MET-T-24GR.html?affId=70238


Kal

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My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0


Last edited by kal on Mon Nov 12, 2012 7:03 pm; edited 1 time in total
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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10077
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Cali Common, Maibock, Helles, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Weizen


PostLink    Posted: Fri May 25, 2012 4:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wall and ceiling framing has been continuing... bulkhead work has also started.

A shot looking into the bathroom where you can see the 5x7' sauna now completely framed:




A reverse angle view from the shower towards the sauna:



The little alcove to the right of the sauna will hold a bench with some shelves above for towels and other things.


The end of the hallway between the sauna and mechanical room is being framed for floor to ceiling shelves for DVDs/Blu-rays on both sides:



A 'fake' door frame is being created to make this DVD storage area seem more like a separate room instead of just the end of the hallway. It also helps hide the fact that ceiling in the DVD storage area has to drop down significantly because of ductwork.


2x12's waiting to be turned into a home theater riser (platform):




I've been concerned with is keeping noise from the mechanical room (furnace/hot water tank/HRV) out of the home theater as much as possible. (I'm actually more concerned about keeping noise *out* of the theater than the other way around).

One of the things we're doing to help with this is to ensure that there are basically always two walls between the home theater and the mechanical room:



Having two completely isolated walls that are drywalled on the outside only (not inside) and then filled with insulation provides you with an STC (sound transmission class) of about 57. Higher numbers are better. A very effective way to isolate if you have the room for a double wall or can make double walls part of your design.

For comparison sake a single 2x4 wall with standard studs, filled with insulation, with a layer of drywall on either side only has an STC of 36.

It's interesting to note that if you add layers of drywall to the insides of the double wall, the STC actually drops down to about 40. Not much better than just a standard single wall.

One problem location where we can't have double walls is the area shown in red in the previous picture. There's no room to do a double wall as the furnace is extremely close to the DVD storage area. So instead, we do something that's almost nearly as good: Staggered studs.



One row of studs installed, one left to go:



A staggered stud wall filled with insulation and a single layer of drywall on either side will give you an STC of about 48. Not as good as a double wall (STC 58) but much better than non-staggered studs (STC 36). You could argue that it's not required here as the wall is not directly facing towards the home theater, but for the minimal added cost I think it's worth it.


HEADS UP:

It may be difficult to provide pictures in the next little while as I've agreed to not show any pictures of the bulkhead framing method that our design/build company uses. It's a special method they've been perfecting over the last ~10 years I'm told. It seems to be completely unique and I'm told it results in perfectly straight bulkheads with joints/seams that do not warp or crack over time, less labour/cost/material, and allows for a tighter fit when space is at a premium (as in the case here in some spots).

All I can say is that it seems like a very effective method that is somewhat of a hybrid of different methods I've seen used in the hundreds of Home Theater constructions I've seen and followed in the past. I found it surprising that nobody else seems to have thought of it so I spent a few hours going through photos of hundreds of other home theater builds on various forums to see if anyone else was doing bulkheads this way and I didn't see any. Interesting.

On the brewery related front, I went to go pick up my modified brewery vent hood a couple of days ago but they had (unfortunately) not done the work correctly nor to level of quality promised so it stays with the shop for another week or so. We'll see what happens...

Kal

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My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0


Last edited by kal on Fri Sep 13, 2013 2:14 am; edited 1 time in total
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10077
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Cali Common, Maibock, Helles, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Weizen


PostLink    Posted: Wed May 30, 2012 3:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The riser (platform) for the second row of home theater seating is now done:



The front row of seating goes in front off the riser (to the left in the photo above). The riser puts the second row of seats 12" higher than the first which lets people in the second row see the screen without having to look around heads in the first row.

The screen surface itself will be 28" at the lowest point so a 12" riser works well. When it comes to risers, higher is always better (within reason) but then you start to possibly get bumped heads.

These are the same numbers and distances I used at the old house so I know it works well. The second row may be slightly farther back than what we did previously because now we have more room. We'll see.

One of the problems with risers is trying to find a way to make it interesting and not just be a giant box covered in carpet. They can sometimes look odd in a multi-function room such as this because they're open on 2 sides. In a dedicated home theater room 3 of the sides will be against walls so all you see is steps (no sides).

Since the riser is 12" high a step is required, so we'll use that to add some detail to the riser by including an "open" or "floating" square edged wood step that goes all around the side (including the little angled cutout). Every few feet you put some sort of support. Something like this:



The side of the riser will be matching wood and the top will have a square bullnose (that's the reason the plywood doesn't go right to the edge - to provide room for the bullnose). All this wood will probably be some sort of dark stain.

This should hopefully get rid of that 'giant box of carpet' look.


So how's the old saying go? "Measure twice, cut once?". I had provided the builder my home theater chair dimensions and distances from the screen wall (front row starts at 9' from the screen) so that the riser could be designed/built.

After it was built I did a sanity check and pulled a chair out and realized that the chair depth I provided was 39" but that the chairs are actually closer to 34-35" deep. Oops. When placed in in the right location at 9' from the screen, this left an uncomfortable (unsafe) ~6" gap between the riser and the back of the front row of seats. Not good. You don't want someone to step off the riser by accident and twist an ankle. At the old house the front row of seats came within 2 inches of the riser so I want the same thing here.

So an extra three 2x12's will be added like this:



Measure twice, cut once.


The riser was stuffed with fiberglass insulation before the plywood was screwed to the top. We thought about turning the riser into a broadband bass trap but then decided against it.

What's a bass trap? Bass traps are used in corners to lessen low frequencies that peak at the room boundaries (right tri-corners where velocity is the lowest / pressure is highest). They’re often done in risers with openings that are where the peaks exist which means making a bunch of holes on top of the riser along the side and back wall boundaries. On a riser the size of mine you’d need about 8-10 cutouts for big 4x10" open registers for this to be a broadband bass trap. Use too few and you’ll inadvertently create a Helmholz resonator which (if not tuned properly) usually does more harm than good since it only only absorbs a narrow frequency range.

I decided against it in the end because:

(a) Putting a bunch of 4x10" vents along the side and back would have looked ugly (though really long diffuser registers could probably be found),
(b) It would have probably have to have been framed with 2x6's instead of 2x12's to make one giant cavity to work effectively (more work),
(c) And more importantly: It probably would not have been that much of a benefit given the open concept room and given the fact that the second row won't be that close to the back or side wall where bass peaks may occur.

We'll see. Down the road if I ever get around to measuring the room response I can always cut out some holes for registers if I want. It can always be done later. I rarely sit in the back row anyway. Wink


There's a waste water stack from the main floor powder room that drains to the right of where the first row of seats will end up. This could simply be framed as as column that bumps out (it would actually be perfectly located for the right rear/side bipolar speaker which is to be placed up high), but we feel the bump out would get in the way of the step on that side of the riser. It also creates a break in the wall that isn't matched anywhere else.

Lots of people built columns to hide side/rear speakers but we're not in a dedicated room so having columns on one side we feel would look odd.

So the stack is s being moved into the wall to completely hide it:





Kal

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wubears71



Joined: 14 Mar 2012
Posts: 278
Location: Webster Groves, MO

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PostLink    Posted: Wed May 30, 2012 3:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What progress! That sucks about the riser not being quite right but at least the fix is relatively straight forward. I wish you could share the bulkhead framing method pics as that would be neat to see what is so proprietary. It must be quite a competitive advantage for them.
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