Return to TheElectricBrewery.com
  [ Shop ]   [ Building ]   [ Using ]   [ Recipes ]   [ Testimonials ]   [ Gallery ]   [ FAQ ]   [ About Us ]   [ Contact Us ]   [ Newsletter ]

Log inLog in   RegisterRegister   User Control PanelUser Control Panel   Private MessagesPrivate Messages   MembershipClub Memberships   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   Photo AlbumsPhoto Albums   Forum FAQForum FAQ

Kal's basement Brewery/Bar/Home Theatre build 2.0
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 9, 10, 11 ... 24, 25, 26  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic   Printer-friendly view    TheElectricBrewery.com Forum Index -> Building Your Brewery
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9847
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Janet's Brown, Maibock, Kolsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: West Coast Blaster (American Red IPA)


PostLink    Posted: Thu Aug 09, 2012 12:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote


        Register to remove this ad. It's free!
VaWineSnob wrote:
Looking great Kal. I'm glad to see you decided to take the Kerdi all the way up the shower walls.

Yup! Me too. We've got cement board behind so we should be well covered now. Belt *and* suspenders as you said. Wink

There's also an empty crawl space behind the wall directly behind where the shower head goes which is an added bonus. It's a small 2 foot by 3 foot area you can actually stand up in after you crawl under the stairs. You can see it in this picture to the left of the bathroom and north of the stairs:



It's the small area between the bathroom and the bar. You get to it through a special hinged door to the left of the sliding door at the bottom of the stair. The area needs to be accessible as it's the "head end" for the house that has the cable/phone/internet/security wiring and panels/boxes.

What's great about this is that we can actually get at the shower tower plumbing and floor drain to actually see what's going on if ever there's a suspected leak or issue, not to mention that having it open I would think would allow any moisture that may penetrate to dry fairly well (should a problem actually occur). I imagine the usual problem is that moisture in the walls gets locked in there and has nowhere to go but into the (usually wood) framing. You can even see behind about half the long shower wall too at the top. So pretty much the two problem walls are exposed from behind.

It wasn't purposely designed like this , it just came about.

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9847
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Janet's Brown, Maibock, Kolsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: West Coast Blaster (American Red IPA)


PostLink    Posted: Thu Aug 09, 2012 1:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There's one thing I don't get with one of the Schluter products we used in the shower: It's the Schluter-DILEX-BWS "surface movement joint".

Link to product: http://www.schluter.com/4_7_dilex_bws.aspx

It looks like this:



Quote:
Schluter®-DILEX-BWS

Application and Function

Surface joints must be placed within the tiled surface regardless of substrate conditions. They provide stress relief from movements in the tile field due to thermal and moisture expansion/contraction and loading.

Schluter-DILEX-BWS is a prefabricated, maintenance-free surface movement joint profile. It features trapezoid-perforated anchoring legs, made of recycled rigid PVC, which are secured in the mortar bond coat and provide edge protection for adjacent tiles. The profile separates individual fields in the tile covering and accommodates movement via the soft chlorinated polyethylene (CPE) movement zone, which also forms the visible surface.

The movement zone is only 3/16" (5 mm) wide, matching common grout joint widths. The profile absorbs relatively limited movements, given the width of the movement zone. This should be taken into account when evaluating the requirements for a specific application.

If larger movements within the covering are anticipated, the Schluter-DILEX-BWS may be installed with greater frequency to create smaller fields, or the Schluter-DILEX-BWB (3/8" (10 mm) movement zone) may be used.

Schluter-DILEX-BWS is suitable for both residential and medium-duty commercial applications, such as offices and stores, subject to light mechanical loads (e.g., offices and stores). The profile is also suited for exterior use.


It's installed between tiles right where the floor tile starts to slope in the shower. It's the light brown stripe between the tiles in the right of this picture:



I understand what movement joints are for. To quote Schluter: "They provide stress relief from movements in the tile field due to thermal and moisture expansion/contraction and loading." You see them in bridges, sidewalks, and other places where expansion/contraction can occur due to environmental changes.

So why's it needed here? The slope is so minimal that you don't need it for the change of angle. Maybe it's because the material the tile is attached to isn't continuous? On the slightly sloped shower floor on the left the tile is attached to the Schulter foam shower tray resting on concrete, and on the flat floor to the right the tile is attached to a plywood backer/platon that is screwed to the foundation. Over time there may be subtle shifting between the two which may cause cracking in the grout, so an expansion joint is used instead.

But then why only on the one side? Shouldn't it be on all 4 sides? Schluter makes movement joints for just about any application (corner, wall/floor transitions, etc). I would have expected to see it (or a similar product) all around if it was used in one spot. You can't have shifting on one side but not the other. Tiles don't stretch. If they did, you wouldn't need an expansion joint. Wink

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
VaWineSnob



Joined: 14 Jun 2011
Posts: 86



PostLink    Posted: Thu Aug 09, 2012 2:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kal wrote:

So why's it needed here? The slope is so minimal that you don't need it for the change of angle. Maybe it's because the material the tile is attached to isn't continuous? On the slightly sloped shower floor on the left the tile is attached to the Schulter foam shower tray resting on concrete, and on the flat floor to the right the tile is attached to a plywood backer/platon that is screwed to the foundation. Over time there may be subtle shifting between the two which may cause cracking in the grout, so an expansion joint is used instead.

But then why only on the one side? Shouldn't it be on all 4 sides? Schluter makes movement joints for just about any application (corner, wall/floor transitions, etc). I would have expected to see it (or a similar product) all around if it was used in one spot. You can't have shifting on one side but not the other. Tiles don't stretch. If they did, you wouldn't need an expansion joint. Wink

Kal


I honestly do not know. The showers I've built have all been custom sizes so I built a mud bed to create the pre-slope to the drain, the Schluter premade foam pans just wouldn't fit my applications. I suspect you may be right about the change in material, if I'm understanding you correctly the foam pre-slope is smaller than the shower floor so they basically carried the plywood subfloor through one end of the shower to make up the difference? I would agree that the expansion material needs to be on the two sides where the foam pre-slope meets the plywood. Schluter makes expansion joints for corners also, but most tile installers will use caulk in carners (every grout manufacturer makes a caulk to match their grout). I'm a huge fan of Mapei grout and caulk products. Grout will crack if used in corners, caulk will not.

Are you saying there is a flat surface to the right of the pre-slope? Is this within the wet area? You really need all the floors in the wet area to pitch to the drain.
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9847
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Janet's Brown, Maibock, Kolsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: West Coast Blaster (American Red IPA)


PostLink    Posted: Thu Aug 09, 2012 2:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

They broke the concrete:



And then used a form and re-poured concrete:



To get this:



The foam shower tray sits in the lower area that was re-poured to be a couple of inches lower than the rest of the floor. Both surfaces are level. The slope in the shower area comes from the foam insert. It has the slope built in.

The plywood subfloor is used only where the floor is flat:



The expansion joint is exactly where the two areas meet: Sloped area to the left that's basically in the shower, non-sloped to the right which is basically a "hallway" or entry point into the shower. The glass shower wall won't even come that far over to the right I don't think. I wouldn't consider this a "wet" area as it's so far away from the shower head. The tile still has waterproofing underneath, just in case. It's sort of like the first couple of feet outside of a shower. Your feet will be wet but it shouldn't have water running over it from the shower. If it did, it would have to be slanted too.

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9847
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Janet's Brown, Maibock, Kolsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: West Coast Blaster (American Red IPA)


PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 2:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The back wall of the shower was completed today. There's a floor to ceiling niche that will have 3-4 glass shelves for shampoo/soap/etc that has a special mosaic tile.



Close-up of the mosaic tile:



Originally the shower niche was going to be on the left side near where shower controls and head would be, but due to varous framing reasons it ended up on the right side. This is actually probably a good thing as less water in the niche means less cleaning, less standing water, and so on.

Floor to ceiling shower niches seem to be uncommon. Normally you'd have a little 12-18" high cubby hole somewhere. When the drywall hangers were working we happened to be walking by and noticed that they had installed cement board completely over the niche. I guess they saw a few studs close together and figured it was just standard wall framing (even though there was a plywood backer).

That's the one thing I've really noticed with this project that seems to have a lot 'special' things. You have a lot of trades coming and going and they're used to doing the same thing over and over again and will often miss things that are non-standard. It just means that project oversight needs to more vigilent.

Another example:

Number of trades that have commented on the "stage" (aka riser) in the home theater and asked where the stripper pole was going: 5 (and counting, including the city inspector)

No joke. I'm almost tempted to install one so that they stop asking. And then start charging for admission. "Gentlemen put your hands together for the lovely Kal ...".

Hanging upside down from the pole would probably be good for my back & herniated disc.

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
perogi



Joined: 12 Feb 2012
Posts: 822
Location: NH

Drinking: Perogi Pale, NEIPA, Nutter's Crossing Nut Brown Ale, Edmund Fitzgerald Porter Clone

Working on: Max's Maibock


PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 1:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kal wrote:
Hanging upside down from the pole would probably be good for my back & herniated disc.
Kal


I'm not sure if that would be good for anyone's vision either - well maybe the ladies. I, for one, would need some brain bleach Razz
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9847
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Janet's Brown, Maibock, Kolsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: West Coast Blaster (American Red IPA)


PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 1:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There's going to be lots of beer available on tap in the bar. Isn't that enough?

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
huaco



Joined: 05 Apr 2012
Posts: 1508
Location: Burleson Texas


PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 1:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, but you get up on a pole and that beer will vanish much faster than you thought it would. What has been seen can not be un-seen!
Back to top
View user's photo album (10 photos)
huaco



Joined: 05 Apr 2012
Posts: 1508
Location: Burleson Texas


PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 1:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Enjoying the play-by-play coverage of the basement build. So do they pretty much have all the nasty, dust-creating parts of the job finished now? I bet keeping concrete and drywall dust out of the rest of the house was a fun challenge...
Back to top
View user's photo album (10 photos)
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9847
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Janet's Brown, Maibock, Kolsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: West Coast Blaster (American Red IPA)


PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

huaco wrote:
Enjoying the play-by-play coverage of the basement build. So do they pretty much have all the nasty, dust-creating parts of the job finished now? I bet keeping concrete and drywall dust out of the rest of the house was a fun challenge...

Mostly.

There's only a single coat of primer on the walls right now. They still need a light sanding in parts before first coat of final paint plus a few spots where drywall was fixed up. Once that's done and carpet goes in it'll keep a lot of the dust down.

There's pretty much a layer of fine dust everywhere on the main floor. It's hell on the vacuum motor too and clogs the bags in no time. I've also been changing the furnace filter like crazy. Sometimes every few days.

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
perogi



Joined: 12 Feb 2012
Posts: 822
Location: NH

Drinking: Perogi Pale, NEIPA, Nutter's Crossing Nut Brown Ale, Edmund Fitzgerald Porter Clone

Working on: Max's Maibock


PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 1:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Two words - Dyson vacuum. That thing rocks.
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9847
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Janet's Brown, Maibock, Kolsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: West Coast Blaster (American Red IPA)


PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 1:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I prefer Miele myself but that's just me. I don't see how bagless can actually work and filter out fine stuff.

They're about the same price but Dyson spends most of that money on commercials instead of stuff in the vacuum. About the only consumer product that has higher % of cost spent on advertising are cars. Bose is another great example where most of the money you spend on their products is to pay for advertising.

Was talking to a guy who specialized in vacuums years ago that I trust (he sells both Dyson and Miele) and pointed out that the ~$600 Dyson was a good ~$200 vacuum.

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0


Last edited by kal on Fri Aug 10, 2012 1:55 pm; edited 2 times in total
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
huaco



Joined: 05 Apr 2012
Posts: 1508
Location: Burleson Texas


PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 1:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We have a Pro-Aqua vacuum cleaner. It uses a basin of water to filter and trap debris. That thing is INCREDIBLE! You can just set it up and turn it on without a hose attached and it will clean the air in the house. Within a few hours the water is dark and nasty just from sucking in crap from the air!
Back to top
View user's photo album (10 photos)
perogi



Joined: 12 Feb 2012
Posts: 822
Location: NH

Drinking: Perogi Pale, NEIPA, Nutter's Crossing Nut Brown Ale, Edmund Fitzgerald Porter Clone

Working on: Max's Maibock


PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 2:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Agreed on the advertising and it's definitely an expensive vacuum.

We have two dogs who are HUGE shedders - when we had a vacuum with a bag, we would have to change it continuously as the suction would decrease and become useless. The dyson picks it all up and dumping it and continuing the process makes vacuuming much less of a chore.

As far as not collecting fine particles, it uses a HEPA filter downstream from the collection system. That is also easy to clean but takes a while to let it dry. Dyson recommends that it should be cleaned once every 6 months - more often if you are cleaning animal dander and small particulates.

For our usage, it's been worth every penny - we've owned it for 8 years now and it shows no signs of dying.
Back to top
perogi



Joined: 12 Feb 2012
Posts: 822
Location: NH

Drinking: Perogi Pale, NEIPA, Nutter's Crossing Nut Brown Ale, Edmund Fitzgerald Porter Clone

Working on: Max's Maibock


PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 2:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

huaco wrote:
We have a Pro-Aqua vacuum cleaner. It uses a basin of water to filter and trap debris. That thing is INCREDIBLE! You can just set it up and turn it on without a hose attached and it will clean the air in the house. Within a few hours the water is dark and nasty just from sucking in crap from the air!


lol that's sweet. Take that roomba!
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9847
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Janet's Brown, Maibock, Kolsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: West Coast Blaster (American Red IPA)


PostLink    Posted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 8:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Realstone wall in the bathroom was installed yesterday:







It's Realstone "Mocha honed":

http://www.realstonesystems.com/natural-stone-products-thin-stone-veneer-collection-mocha.php

It's a new product of theirs. Unlike most ReadStone panels the thicknesses of the slivers vary on this one so you have to make a design choice when you start: Install them all in the same orientation and do more cuts to avoid an overly consistent look in the corners, or flip some from time to time and end up with non-continuous horizontal lines. We went with horizontal lines that are straight & more cuts.

They still have to do the bottom row and above the door. Then the opposite vanity wall gets tiled about 1/3 of the way up.

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0


Last edited by kal on Sun Aug 12, 2012 1:23 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
perogi



Joined: 12 Feb 2012
Posts: 822
Location: NH

Drinking: Perogi Pale, NEIPA, Nutter's Crossing Nut Brown Ale, Edmund Fitzgerald Porter Clone

Working on: Max's Maibock


PostLink    Posted: Sat Aug 11, 2012 11:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Unbelievably impressive - for once, I'm speechless Smile
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9847
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Janet's Brown, Maibock, Kolsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: West Coast Blaster (American Red IPA)


PostLink    Posted: Sun Aug 12, 2012 12:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Off-colours from the camera aside (I didn't colour correct any of these pictures), I think it came out pretty well! I'm happy with the results and look. The RealStone works well with the tile I think.

There was talk about staining the cedar sauna door to match a bit better. Maybe replace the wood handle with something more modern and stainless. We'll see.

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
Castermmt



Joined: 03 Jan 2011
Posts: 864
Location: Lowell, In

Drinking: Steelhead Porter, Alt-Toids, Hefty-Weizen, Terry's Kolsch, African Amber, Pumpkin Ale, Double Dog Ale

Working on: Janet's Brown Ale, Terry's Kolsch, Pilsner


PostLink    Posted: Sun Aug 12, 2012 1:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

All I can say is, WOW. very nice look. The door stain as long as its not too dark would look killer. I like the wood door handle its looks like part of the door and doesn't clash with the style of the room. Again, WOW!
_________________
http://www.theelectricbrewery.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=24836
Back to top
VaWineSnob



Joined: 14 Jun 2011
Posts: 86



PostLink    Posted: Mon Aug 13, 2012 11:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just stunning Kal.
Back to top
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic   Printer-friendly view    TheElectricBrewery.com Forum Index -> Building Your Brewery All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 9, 10, 11 ... 24, 25, 26  Next
Page 10 of 26
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Support our site by purchasing through this link. We thank you!

Forum powered by phpBB © phpBB Group