Return to TheElectricBrewery.com
Home ]   [ Products ]   [ Testimonials ]   [ Gallery ]   [ FAQ ]   [ What's New ]   [ About Us ]   [ Contact Us ]   [ Newsletter ]

Log inLog in   RegisterRegister   User Control PanelUser Control Panel   Private MessagesPrivate Messages   MembershipClub Memberships   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   Photo AlbumsPhoto Albums   Forum FAQForum FAQ

Blonde Ale / Premium Lager (batch #123)

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic   Printer-friendly view    TheElectricBrewery.com Forum Index -> Recipes & Ingredients
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 4328
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Amber Ale, Firestone Walker Double Jack, Electric Pale Ale, Russian Imperial Stout, Kolsch, Weizen, Irish Stout, Cream Ale

Working on: Pub Ale


PostLink    Posted: Sat Feb 25, 2012 9:29 pm    Post subject: Blonde Ale / Premium Lager (batch #123) Reply with quote


        Register to remove this ad. It's free!


This Blonde Ale / Premium Lager is one of our house favourites. It's a big hit with everyone who tries it as there's enough malt and hop flavour to keep the beer snobs happy (we don't use any corn or rice), but it's still light enough to not scare away the Bud/Miller/Coors drinkers. It's a beer that just about anyone who likes beer can enjoy.

It's a very simple recipe with one type of malt and one type of hop. Far too many brewers tend to over-complicate recipes. Sometimes simpler is better!

The trick is choosing good quality fresh ingredients such as the German Weyermann Pilsner Malt and Hallertau noble hops that we use here, and pitching enough yeast. All things equal, lagers typically require twice as much yeast as an ale because they're fermented at much lower temperatures.

The choice of German malt and hops makes this a German style Blonde Ale or Premium Lager.

Brewing with lager yeast instead of ale yeast provides a cleaner tasting beer with a touch less fruitiness and yeast derived character.

If brewing as a Premium Lager, patience is required as lagers will also take about twice as long to ferment and then require lagering (held at near freezing) for a month or more after fermentation is complete to mellow and smooth out.

Most people will find the Blonde Ale is therefore decidedly easier to brew as it does not require special fermentation equipment to main a lower temperature and the whole process takes less time.

Brew up a batch and let me know how you like it!

I first brewed this on November 10, 2010.

For a cleaner/dryer beer, consider our Cream Ale / Standard Lager recipe instead.


Purchasing through our links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!


Blonde Ale / Premium Lager

Size: 12.0 gal (post-boil)
Efficiency: 95.0%
Attenuation: 80.0%
Calories: 160 kcal per 12.0 fl oz

Original Gravity: 1.048 (1.046 - 1.056)
Terminal Gravity: 1.010 (1.008 - 1.012)
Color: 3.1 (2.0 - 6.0)
Alcohol: 5.1% (4.6% - 6.0%)
Bitterness: 19 (15.0 - 25.0)

Ingredients:
18.0 lb Weyermann Pilsner malt (Buy at: Amazon, MoreBeer, HighGravity, AiH, OBK)
2.7 oz Hallertau Hops (4.5%) - added during boil, boiled 60 min (19.0 IBU) (Buy at: Amazon, MoreBeer, HighGravity, AiH, OBK)
1 Whirlfloc Tablet (Irish moss) - added during boil, boiled 15 min (Buy at: Amazon, MoreBeer, HighGravity, AiH, OBK)
24 g Fermentis Safale US-05 dry yeast (Buy at: Amazon, MoreBeer, HighGravity, AiH, OBK)

Notes:
Add 500mg potassium metabisulphite to 20 gallons water to remove chlorine/chloramine (as required).
Water treated with brewing salts to: Ca=49, Mg=10, Na=16, Cl=69, S04=69
(Hit minimums on Ca and Mg, keep the Cl:SO4 ratio low and balanced).
1.5 qt/lb mash thickness. Single infusion mash at 149F for 90 mins. Mashout to 168F.
60-90 min fly sparge with ~6 pH water. Collect 14.9 gallons in boil kettle.
Boil for 90 minutes. Lid on at flameout, start chilling immediately.
Cool wort to 68F and aerate well. Ferment at 68F until complete.
Rack to brite tank (secondary), crash chill to near freezing (if possible), add 1 tsp of unflavoured gelatin dissolved in a cup of hot distilled water per 5 gallons of beer, and let clear for 2-3 days.
Package as you would normally. I keg and carbonate at around 2.5 volumes of C02. The beer will improve greatly if kept near freezing for 1-2 months before serving. I use a lagering/conditioning fridge that holds 6 kegs, set to just above freezing that holds a small 5 pound CO2 tank so that the kegs can condition and carbonate at the same time.

If you prefer to use liquid yeast, either of these is an excellent choice as they are the same clean fermenting Chico strain as US-05:

Wyeast 1056 American Ale (Buy at: Amazon, MoreBeer, HighGravity, AiH, OBK)
White Labs WLP-001 California Ale (Buy at: Amazon, MoreBeer, HighGravity, AiH, OBK)

You'll need to use 4 packs or make an appropriate starter. For more information see Chapter 6 of How to Brew and Appendix A of Brewing Classic Styles.

Variations:
If you have the means to ferment at lower temperatures, consider making a Premium Lager instead of a Blonde Ale. To do this replace the ale yeast with twice as much lager yeast and ferment at a colder 52F temperature. Once at approximately 2-5 points from final gravity, raise the temperature to 65F keep it there for 2-4 days to reduce diacetyl (a buttery flavour produced by some yeasts).

The following lager yeasts would be suitable:

48 g of Fermentis Saflager W-34/70 dry lager yeast (Buy at: Amazon, MoreBeer, HighGravity, AiH, OBK)
8 packs Wyeast 2007 Pilsnen Lager (Buy at: Amazon, MoreBeer, HighGravity, AiH, OBK)
8 vials White Labs WLP-840 American Lager (Buy at: Amazon, MoreBeer, HighGravity, AiH, OBK)

The lager version will greatly improve if kept near freezing for 1-2 months before serving. I like to do this in the keg after packaging.

The Premium Lager will be very similar but will not have the slightly fruity/estery notes typical of most ales. Lagers tend to be cleaner tasting with less yeast-derived character. Curious about the differences? Split the batch of beer and ferment half as a lager at 52F, and half as an ale at 68F.

For complete brewing instructions, see our Brew Day: Step by Step guide.

Brew yourself a batch today and let us know how you like it! Enjoy!

Purchasing through our links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!

SEE OUR OTHER RECIPES »

Kal

_________________
Support our site by using our links. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0


Last edited by kal on Tue Nov 04, 2014 6:49 pm; edited 20 times in total
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
-MG-



Joined: 05 Dec 2011
Posts: 204



PostLink    Posted: Mon Apr 02, 2012 6:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This was my first batch I made on the system on Feb 27th.

The only flaw in the beer has been my impatience. I have had it kegged and on tap for 3 weeks or so. Up til now it was ok.

Today I tasted it, and it has really changed!

Just as an FYI for those of you scratching your head at how things came together.

I pressure fermented and was complete within 4 days! The yeast moved quickly. Reached FG and let it sit there another 3-4 days. Kegged and sat at serving temp. For 3 weeks.

My APA also is starting to mellow out a particular taste I am not caring for, once again. My impatience was the only fault here.

Felt like I brewed these batches ages ago, it really hasn't been that long Mug
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 4328
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Amber Ale, Firestone Walker Double Jack, Electric Pale Ale, Russian Imperial Stout, Kolsch, Weizen, Irish Stout, Cream Ale

Working on: Pub Ale


PostLink    Posted: Mon Apr 02, 2012 6:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

-MG- wrote:
I pressure fermented and was complete within 4 days! The yeast moved quickly. Reached FG and let it sit there another 3-4 days. Kegged and sat at serving temp.

This was the lager you made or the ale? That seems impossibly fast for lager. For an ale it could work.

When I make this as a lager I ferment for about 2-3 weeks, let it sit for another 2 weeks or so to "clean up" after itself and then rack, add gelatine for 2-3 days to clear, keg, and then let it sit for a month near freezing to lager.

So about 2-3 months from brew day to serving (for a lager).

Kal

_________________
Support our site by using our links. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0


Last edited by kal on Mon Apr 22, 2013 6:05 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 4328
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Amber Ale, Firestone Walker Double Jack, Electric Pale Ale, Russian Imperial Stout, Kolsch, Weizen, Irish Stout, Cream Ale

Working on: Pub Ale


PostLink    Posted: Mon Apr 02, 2012 6:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just re-read your post... are you saying that it tasted fine when kegged then after 3 weeks it was no longer good? That's odd. That's probably some sort of infection. It should also be very "green" and young tasting when first kegged. It should really mellow out and become clean tasting a month after lagering. Even 2-3 months is good. I have some lager in the serving freezer that's 8 months old. It's fantastically clean tasting stuff (wife beer).

Not being in a hurry and paying attention to the details makes good beer.

Being in a hurry and trying to take shortcuts can sometimes work if you know what you're doing, but often it results in failure. When things fail you're even farther behind than before.

I like to take the tried and true, zero risk, slow road. When it comes to brewing, be the turtle, not the hare. Wink

Don't have enough beer? Get more kegs. That way you won't be waiting. You'll always have something interesting to drink.
IMHO you should have 2-3 times as many kegs as taps.

Kal

_________________
Support our site by using our links. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
-MG-



Joined: 05 Dec 2011
Posts: 204



PostLink    Posted: Mon Apr 02, 2012 7:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kal wrote:
Just re-read your post... are you saying that it tasted fine when kegged then after 3 weeks it was no longer good? That's odd. That's probably some sort of infection. It should also be very "green" and young tasting when first kegged. It should really mellow out and become clean tasting a month after lagering. Even 2-3 months is good. I have some lager in the serving freezer that's 8 months old. It's fantastically clean tasting stuff (wife beer).

Kal


Other way around. It got much better after a month of lagering! Before that, it had this sweet taste to it that I couldn't quite figure out. That has gone away.
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 4328
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Amber Ale, Firestone Walker Double Jack, Electric Pale Ale, Russian Imperial Stout, Kolsch, Weizen, Irish Stout, Cream Ale

Working on: Pub Ale


PostLink    Posted: Mon Apr 02, 2012 7:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good! Lagering cleans up a lot.

If it's a rushed fermentation then you may need to lager longer, but if you fermented at way too high a temp then no amount of lagering can fix it.

What temp did you ferment it at?

Kal

_________________
Support our site by using our links. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
-MG-



Joined: 05 Dec 2011
Posts: 204



PostLink    Posted: Mon Apr 02, 2012 7:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I fermented at exactly 52 ambient.

Closed system fermentation is a new beast to me (huge thread on HBT) on it. I basically had the yeast sitting on 5 PSI for about 4 days, I took a sample through a picnic tap I had on the sanke coupler and let it degas. When I took a hydrometer reading it was at FG. I've heard some lagers under pressure can ferment quick, but 4 days seemed really crazy, which is why I let it sit for another 4 days or so.

_________________
My new build progress thread
Back to top
huaco



Joined: 05 Apr 2012
Posts: 1330
Location: Burleson Texas


PostLink    Posted: Wed Dec 19, 2012 9:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What should I expect with this yeast? (DRY 34-70 LAGER YEAST) I am brewing my first Lager Friday evening (not this recipe) and just want to know if it is crazy-active or what. What kind of krausen should I expect? Temps to ferment at?
Back to top
View user's photo album (10 photos)
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 4328
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Amber Ale, Firestone Walker Double Jack, Electric Pale Ale, Russian Imperial Stout, Kolsch, Weizen, Irish Stout, Cream Ale

Working on: Pub Ale


PostLink    Posted: Wed Dec 19, 2012 9:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

From the recipe:

Quote:
48 g Fermentis Saflager W-34/70 dry lager yeast (assuming you're making 11-12 gallons of wort)
Cool wort to 53F and aerate well. Ferment at 53F until complete. Lager for 1 month.


Lager yeasts are not crazy active since they're kept cold. They move slow. Barely any krausen at these volumes we brew at.
It can take a good 2-4 weeks to finish. Usually done in 2-3 but I leave an extra week. Then rack, add gelatine for a few days to clear, then keg/lager. 1 month is good. 2 months a bit better.

You can't be in a hurry with lagers. Like all beers, try it once and a while (like once a week) to see how it changes.

Kal

_________________
Support our site by using our links. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 4328
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Amber Ale, Firestone Walker Double Jack, Electric Pale Ale, Russian Imperial Stout, Kolsch, Weizen, Irish Stout, Cream Ale

Working on: Pub Ale


PostLink    Posted: Mon Apr 22, 2013 6:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

EDIT: I've switched up this recipe a bit to make it either a Blonde Ale or a Premium Lager. Your choice! I often make split batches this way.

Kal

_________________
Support our site by using our links. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 4328
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Amber Ale, Firestone Walker Double Jack, Electric Pale Ale, Russian Imperial Stout, Kolsch, Weizen, Irish Stout, Cream Ale

Working on: Pub Ale


PostLink    Posted: Thu May 30, 2013 7:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So I brewed this Blonde Ale yesterday and this is the second time I've made the following changes:

1. Used 10% regular table sugar to help dry it out a bit more, hopefully bringing the FG down to 1.006 - 1.007.

2. Reduced the OG from 1.048 down to 1.044 to compensate for item #1 above as I want this to still be around 5% ABV.

3. Used American Crystal hops for a different taste. Crystal are Mild, and almost 'Noble' if an American hop can be considered noble. To quote Beer Tools Pro: "Used mainly for its aroma which is mild and pleasant".

4. A touch of Carapils®/Carafoam® for mouthfeel.

So it's almost like our Cream Ale recipe, actually quite close, just still with Weyermann Pilsner malt instead of 2-row.

It's fermenting now.

As part of my Chico yeast experiment, half of it is on Safale US-05 dry yeast, the other half on White Labs WLP-001 California Ale liquid yeast

Kal

_________________
Support our site by using our links. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
captacl



Joined: 30 Sep 2014
Posts: 30
Location: Bethlehem, PA USA


PostLink    Posted: Fri Oct 24, 2014 2:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just brewed this beer on 10/12. Not only was it the first on my electric brewery setup, it was my first brew ever. I was a bit nervous on how it would ferment since my mash temps were not exactly stable the way I wanted them. I am using High Gravity's system and he puts the temp probes at about the 5 gal level and my mash volume was only 4 gallons. I ended up having to manually check the temp throughout the process and was not getting consistent temps throughout the mash. I have a feeling I will be slowly changing the system and in the end it will be closer to kal's. I got a probe to measure the temp on the mash tun outlet valve to solve one of the problems. I may also replace the 25' 3/8" copper herms coil with the one kal uses so I can maintain temps better.

Despite my issues I only missed my OG by .002 and my FG is at 1.009 right now. It tastes good even warm and not carbonated. I plan to start the crash chill process on Saturday. I do have a question for those with more experience though. I am using a SS Brewtech 7gal Conical for fermentation. After I dump the trub/yeast, is it acceptable to just dump in the gelatin mixture through the opening on the lid or will that create to much splashing of the beer. I suppose it can be minimized by pouring slowly but still I am curious if it is wise. Only other option I see would be to completely remove the lid and slowly pour the mixture in from just above the liquid level. Replace the lid and put some co2 in the headspace. Also I am trying to figure if I should fill the keg through the outlet post or just place the hose inside the keg after purging with co2 and filling that way. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

Anthony
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 4328
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Amber Ale, Firestone Walker Double Jack, Electric Pale Ale, Russian Imperial Stout, Kolsch, Weizen, Irish Stout, Cream Ale

Working on: Pub Ale


PostLink    Posted: Fri Oct 24, 2014 2:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Congrats on your first beer Anthony! Sounds like it's going pretty well.

Considering that this is your first batch and you don't know your system's efficiency yet, being off by only by only 2 points on your OG is pretty darned good!

Your fermenter is completely full of CO2 at the moment. Feel free to dump in some gelatine dissolved in warm water and give it a gentle stir. If you have the means to blanket with CO2 after (just in case) do so as well. Wait 2-3 days and then dump the gunk and keg or bottle.

When I fill kegs I use a racking cane and vinyl hose that goes to the bottom of the keg though the keg lid. I don't fill through the quick disconnect (outlet post). You can do it that way too of course. Either way works.

Good for you to purge your vessels with CO2 before racking - that helps avoid stability/oxidation issues down the road. Not the biggest issue with this beer (it's more important on very hoppy beers) but it's a good practice to get in to.

Sounds like you've got all well in hand. Let us know how the final beer turns out. Once kegged, leave it for 2-4 weeks on CO2 to carb (and condition). Sample it every few days and you'll see how it gets better with time.

Cheers,

Kal

_________________
Support our site by using our links. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
captacl



Joined: 30 Sep 2014
Posts: 30
Location: Bethlehem, PA USA


PostLink    Posted: Fri Oct 24, 2014 3:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks kal for the advice. I don't know if I have anything to give it a stir without removing the lid. I might have to pick up a racking cane just for that purpose. I will of course update once I taste a carbed sample. Looking forward to brewing the Amber on 11/21.
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 4328
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Amber Ale, Firestone Walker Double Jack, Electric Pale Ale, Russian Imperial Stout, Kolsch, Weizen, Irish Stout, Cream Ale

Working on: Pub Ale


PostLink    Posted: Fri Oct 24, 2014 3:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

captacl wrote:
Thanks kal for the advice. I don't know if I have anything to give it a stir without removing the lid. I might have to pick up a racking cane just for that purpose.

I wouldn't bother. Just dump it in and give the fermenter a very gentle rock and you'll be fine.

I typically add gelatine to my 5 gallon carboys (used as brite tanks) after fermentation is 100% done and then some. They're usually full right to the neck. I add the half cup or so of distilled water with gelatine dissolved in it and give the carboy a very gentle swirl. Nothing more is needed. Within a day or so most of the gunk will have precipitated out. I leave it for 2-3 days total and by then you have a very clear beer.

Kal

_________________
Support our site by using our links. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
captacl



Joined: 30 Sep 2014
Posts: 30
Location: Bethlehem, PA USA


PostLink    Posted: Fri Oct 24, 2014 1:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So come Saturday I will plan the following:

Dump the trub and yeast
Make the gelatin mixture and pour it in from the port on the lid.
Put a little co2 in just in case then give it a gentle shake
Set my temperature controller to drop temp over 2 days to 36 degrees
Let it sit at 36 for 2 days then keg (total time with gelatin would be 4 days)

Would that plan work? Should I drop the temp faster or perhaps lower then 36? Let it sit at that temp longer?
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 4328
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Amber Ale, Firestone Walker Double Jack, Electric Pale Ale, Russian Imperial Stout, Kolsch, Weizen, Irish Stout, Cream Ale

Working on: Pub Ale


PostLink    Posted: Fri Oct 24, 2014 2:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm assuming you made the ale and not the lager (lager requires a different process as per the recipe above).

So your plan will work Drop the temp as fast as you want since (I'm assuming) fermentation should be long done given it's been 2 weeks.
You can drop it as lower if you like, even 32F is fine, but 36F is ok too.

Kal

_________________
Support our site by using our links. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
captacl



Joined: 30 Sep 2014
Posts: 30
Location: Bethlehem, PA USA


PostLink    Posted: Fri Oct 24, 2014 5:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry Kale I should have specified I did the ale version. Thanks for the prompt responses. I wanted my first brew to be a simple fermentation. My first attempt at a lager will probably be your pilsner recipe in December. I am sure I will have questions when the time comes.
Back to top
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic   Printer-friendly view    TheElectricBrewery.com Forum Index -> Recipes & Ingredients All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Support our site by purchasing through this link. We thank you!

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group