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FAQ: Adapting for 220-240V countries
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9494
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, English IPA, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter, Saison

Working on: Kölsch


PostLink    Posted: Sun Feb 12, 2012 8:10 pm    Post subject: FAQ: Adapting for 220-240V countries Reply with quote


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FAQ: Adapting for 220-240V countries

Control panel kits with all 240V parts are available for order. Contact us at Sales@TheElectricBrewery.com for complete details.

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Our control panel build and wiring instructions are written for use in North America or other countries where both 120V and 240V are available. Our control panel design uses both voltages.

In some locations (most notably Europe, Asia, Australia, and New Zealand) the mains power is 220-240V only. 120V is not available. The wiring and part substitutions outlined below will show you how to adapt our instructions for use in these countries.

*PLEASE STILL READ AND FOLLOW THE STANDARD BUILD INSTRUCTIONS AS THEY CONTAIN MANY IMPORTANT DETAILS THAT MAY OTHERWISE BE MISSED. THE WIRING DIAGRAMS BELOW FOR 220-240V COUNTRIES ARE MEANT TO REPLACE THOSE FOUND IN THE REGULAR INSTRUCTIONS BUT EVERYTHING ELSE STILL HOLDS TRUE. CONSIDER THE INSTRUCTIONS BELOW AN ADDENDUM TO THE EXISTING CONTROL PANEL BUILD INSTRUCTIONS*



FAQ

Why are these changes needed? I thought the heating elements ran at 240V even in North America?

Countries with 120V power have the following power connections available:

- GROUND
- NEUTRAL
- HOT A 120V
- HOT B 120V

While the heating elements run at 240V, many of the components in our control panel (PIDs, timer, buzzer, doorbell transformers, relays, and most lights) run at 120V by using the NEUTRAL line together with one of the two HOT lines. The heating elements run at 240V by using both HOT lines together.

Countries with 220-240V power have the following power connections available:

- GROUND (sometimes called EARTH)
- NEUTRAL
- HOT 220-240V (sometimes called LIVE or ACTIVE)

120V is not possible so all components must run at 220-240V. This means that the buzzer, doorbell transformers, relays, and most lights must be replaced with 220-240V versions. The PIDs and timer continue to work as they work anywhere from 90 to 264V.

Wiring changes are required as there is only one 220-240V HOT line instead of two 120V HOT lines.

Does it matter if the power is 50 or 60Hz?

No. The frequency of the mains power does not matter. All of the components work at 50 or 60Hz.

Do I still need to use a ground fault interrupter (GFI)?

Yes. A GFI is required for safety reasons. For more information on GFIs see STEP 1: Supply power of our Control Panel build instructions.

Does it matter if I have 220V, 230V, or 240V available in my country?

No. Anywhere from 200-240V will work. If running at lower than 240V the heating element power output will be slightly lower. For example, a 5500W / 240V heating element running at 208V will output 4160W and draw 19.9 amps. At 230V it will output 5053 watts and draw 22.0 amps.

I only have 3-phase 208V or 400V available. Can I use this panel?

Maybe. You may use a single phase of the 208V or 400V 3-phase system: On most 3-phase 208V power systems 208V is available between any two of the phases (HOT lines) while on most 3-phase 400V power systems 230V is available between any of the phases (HOT lines) and NEUTRAL. Best to confirm with your electrician to be sure what is possible. Both 208V and 230V will work instead of 240V but keep in mind that the heating elements are meant to be run at 240V so at 208V or 230V the power output will be reduced slightly (see previous question). Note that on most 3-phase 208V power systems 120V will also be available between any of the phases (HOT lines) and NEUTRAL so our standard control panel design can also work as both 208V and 120V would be available.

Do the heating elements need to change too?

No. The heating elements as documented on this website will continue to work as they are meant to be used with 240V. No changes are required. If running lower than 240V, power output will be slightly lower (see previous question).


POWER

The relay must use a 240V coil instead of 120V. Countries with 220-240V power may use different 30 amp wall electrical outlets so detailed instructions on which wire is HOT and NEUTRAL cannot be provided. For this reason the exact connection points to use on the 30A/240V power in receptacle are not shown in the diagram blow. Instead, I only label what the wire is for (HOT or NEUTRAL). It is up to the user to ensure that the wires connect up correctly to their wall electrical outlet.

The fuse holder minimum voltage rating must be increased from 125V to at least 240V.

Part changes:

(Qty: 1) Blue 22mm LED pilot light 220-240V AC/DC
(Qty: 1) 30A/240V DPDT or DPST relay with 220-240V AC coil
(Qty: 1) In-line fuse holder for 5x25mm fuses, rated to at least 7A/240V

One of the HOT connectors on the L14-30 power in receptacle will not be used. If you prefer, you may replace the L14-30 receptacle with an L6-30 male receptacle that has 3 spades instead of 4.

Power input wiring diagram (changes are shown in yellow):




GROUND

There are no changes to the ground wiring. If you use a different power in receptacle make sure it has a ground. The ground must be connected to your building's ground plane in the electrical panel using an appropriate power cord.

Countries with 220-240V power all use different 30 amp wall electrical outlets so detailed instructions on which wire is GROUND cannot be provided. For this reason the exact connection points to use on the 30A/240V power in receptacle are not shown in the diagram blow. It is up to the user to ensure that the wires connect up correctly to their wall electrical outlet.

Ground wiring diagram:




VOLT AND AMP METERS

The doorbell transformers must be changed from 120V to 240V* and the boil relay must use a 240V coil.

Part changes:

(Qty: 2) Doorbell transformer (240VAC in, anywhere from 8-24VAC out, any wattage)*
(Qty: 1) 30A/240V DPDT or DPST relay with 220-240V AC coil

*Many doorbell transformers will support both 120V and 240V on the input side. Since these are approximately 10:1 step down transformers, when fed 240V (instead of 120V), the output voltage will be 24V (instead of 12V) which is low enough as the AC to DC power supplies can accept anywhere from 4 to 30V on the input side.

Volt and amp meter wiring diagram (changes are shown in yellow):




PUMPS

The pump lights must be changed from 120V to 240V. The pumps themselves *must* be 220-240V. 120V pumps will not work.
The pump receptacles on the control panel must be changed from L5-15 (125V) to L6-15 (250V) and the pump plugs must then also be changed to L6-15 to match.

Part changes (control panel side):

(Qty: 2) Green 22mm LED pilot light 220-240V AC/DC
(Qty: 2) NEMA L6-15 (250VAC/15A) twist lock electrical female receptacle

Part changes (pump side):

(Qty: 2) March 809 or 815 pump with high temperature stainless steel housing (3/4" MPT center inlet, 1/2" MPT outlet) 230V
(Qty: 2) NEMA L6-15 (250VAC/15A) twist lock electrical plug

Pump wiring diagram (changes are shown in yellow):




PID CONTROLLERS

There are no changes to the PID wiring.

PID controller wiring diagram:




TIMER AND ALARMS

The buzzer and light must be changed from 120V to 240V.

Part changes:

(Qty: 1) 22mm buzzer 220-240V AC/DC
(Qty: 1) Red 22mm LED pilot light 220-240V AC/DC

Timer and alarm wiring diagram (changes are shown in yellow):




HEATING ELEMENTS

The relays must use 240V coils instead of 120V. Wiring remains the same. We are now supplying power to the elements from the NEUTRAL and HOT lines instead of the two HOT lines. The wire colour is changed in the diagram below to show this. The connection the the second HOT line from the power in receptacle has been removed.

Part changes:

(Qty: 2) 30A/240V DPDT or DPST relay with 220-240V AC coil

Heating element wiring diagram (changes are shown in yellow):




SAFE START INTERLOCK

The relays must use 240V coils instead of 120V.

Please make sure to refer to the standard safe start interlock instructions before wiring the diagram below as some special changes may be required.

As per the standard safe start interlock instructions, the two normally closed (NC) contactors that are added to the Element Select switch are screwed on top of the existing normally open (NO) contactors as shown in the picture below:



Part changes:

(Qty: 1) 10A 8-pin 2-pole ice cube plug-in relay with 220-240VAC coil
(Qty: 1) 30A/240V DPDT or DPST relay with 220-240V AC coil

Safe start interlock wiring diagram (changes are shown in yellow):


Once completed, make sure to follow our control panel setup instructions.

I hope this helps!

Kal


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Last edited by kal on Sat Mar 03, 2018 6:31 pm; edited 54 times in total
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Fatbaldingoldgit



Joined: 28 Nov 2011
Posts: 141
Location: Horsham, West Sussex


PostLink    Posted: Sun Feb 12, 2012 9:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Kal,

That helps a great deal, thanks....just one question..There's always one, isn't there

The diagram shows the pump receptacles wired as

X (black) - Hot
W (blue) - Neutral

But the Heating Elements are shown as

Y (black) - Hot
X (blue) - Neutral

The pump receptacle doesn't have a W..but if the W should be Y then that is the opposite of how the Heating Elements are wired isn't it?

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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9494
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, English IPA, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter, Saison

Working on: Kölsch


PostLink    Posted: Sun Feb 12, 2012 11:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good catch on the pump plugs and receptacles. I forgot that they need to change to since the L5-15 items as document only support 125V. You need L6-15 for both the receptacle on the control panel and the plug for the pumps. I've now cahnged the instructions above.

Ground is the L-shaped spade. The X/Y on the heating elements doesn't matter since the element isn't polarized (it's basically just a resistor) or have one side that should be neutral and the other hot.

Kal

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Fatbaldingoldgit



Joined: 28 Nov 2011
Posts: 141
Location: Horsham, West Sussex


PostLink    Posted: Wed Feb 29, 2012 8:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Kal.....and just as I'm embarking on the cabling...

1. I've changed my schema so that X is HOT and Y is NEUTRAL...because that's the natural orientation of the 240v power receptacle with earth/ground being uppermost..I've changed the plug connections to match this too.

2. In the diagrams above you mention 10 gauge white wire....but there is no 10 gauge white wire in the Control Panel kit...There is only 10 gauge Black, Green and Red..the green is earth, black is HOT and red is, well other HOT..but in our 240v system there is no other HOT...so I guess I should use the 10 gauge red wire where the the 10 gauge white wire is specified. The 10 gauge white wire is NEUTRAL.

The problem is that red isn't an intuitive colour for NEUTRAL this side of the pond..In fact it screams LIVE/HOT/DANGER Will Robinson....DANGER!...

..for 240v European/NZ systems I would strongly recommend supplying 10 gauge white instead...

In the meantime does Mike have any 10 gauge white available for immediate shipment? Happy to find the cost..just would rather stay anal as far as colour coding my cables are concerned.

Wink

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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
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Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, English IPA, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter, Saison

Working on: Kölsch


PostLink    Posted: Wed Feb 29, 2012 9:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fatbaldingoldgit wrote:
2. In the diagrams above you mention 10 gauge white wire....but there is no 10 gauge white wire in the Control Panel kit...There is only 10 gauge Black, Green and Red..the green is earth, black is HOT and red is, well other HOT..but in our 240v system there is no other HOT...so I guess I should use the 10 gauge red wire where the the 10 gauge white wire is specified. The 10 gauge white wire is NEUTRAL.

Correct. Colour doesn't matter. Use the 10 ga red wire where the 10 ga white wire is supposed to go.

Quote:
..for 240v European/NZ systems I would strongly recommend supplying 10 gauge white instead...

Good recommendation. I'll recommend it to Mike.

Quote:
In the meantime does Mike have any 10 gauge white available for immediate shipment? Happy to find the cost..just would rather stay anal as far as colour coding my cables are concerned.

I'd just use what you have to avoid delays, but if you want, email Mike at SpikeInnovations@TheElectricBrewery.com with your complete address and he can let you know the cost.

Kal

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electric puha



Joined: 16 Apr 2011
Posts: 19
Location: Wellington, New Zealand


PostLink    Posted: Thu Mar 01, 2012 8:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

FWIW I actually used the red wire and have ordered some white heat shrink to cover the red. Weird I know, but that's me. I concur, it may be optimal for future 240v builds to provide the white wire. It doesn't personally bother me. I've got the entire panel wired, bar the Safe Start. I'm going to recheck the wiring, and more than likely, shorten some of the wiring as well, just to tidy it up.
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Fatbaldingoldgit



Joined: 28 Nov 2011
Posts: 141
Location: Horsham, West Sussex


PostLink    Posted: Thu Mar 01, 2012 12:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Electric Puha...

Yes I have come to that conclusion too...Mike has kindly offered to get me some 10 ga in white but it won't get here anytime soon..and as is the case in the UK I suspect you can't obtain that spec cable either in NZ.

I've ordered some white heat shrink....that was a bit tricky to find too..but it'll be here tomorrow so I won't be delayed doing the cabling...

...../David

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skelley



Joined: 24 Feb 2012
Posts: 210
Location: brookfield, wisconsin


PostLink    Posted: Sun Apr 15, 2012 3:40 pm    Post subject: pump receptacles Reply with quote

my pump receptacles I received with the kit do not have any labels on the three terminals. They simply are three different colors: green (presumed ground), gold and silver. Can not figure out which is the neutral and which is to be used as a hot?
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9494
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, English IPA, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter, Saison

Working on: Kölsch


PostLink    Posted: Sun Apr 15, 2012 4:52 pm    Post subject: Re: pump receptacles Reply with quote

skelley wrote:
my pump receptacles I received with the kit do not have any labels on the three terminals. They simply are three different colors: green (presumed ground), gold and silver. Can not figure out which is the neutral and which is to be used as a hot?

Green = Ground
Brass = Hot
Silver = Neutral

More important that you wire your pumps themselves the same way on the pump side.

KAl

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dennisdk2000



Joined: 22 Apr 2012
Posts: 4



PostLink    Posted: Sun Apr 22, 2012 6:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
The GREEN ground wire is connected to the ground blade, while the black and white (hot wires) are connected to the other two blades. Normally in AC circuits BLACK signifies a hot wire while WHITE is NEUTRAL, but in our setup both BLACK and WHITE are used as 120 VAC hot wires so the orientation of BLACK and WHITE does not matter here.


-from http://theelectricbrewery.com/heating-elements?page=8

This bit I don't follow... surely there should always be one (or more) hot wires AND one (or more) neutral wires? In any case, I live in the UK so would be doing a 240V setup - so I take it that changes things anyway?
Also, I'd be interested in a setup for a brew-length of around 5 imperial gallons (about 6 US gallons) at that is the standard over here. I'm guessing that means smaller pots and smaller heating elements (which would suit me). How does that change things? Any idea where I might find suitable elements of a smaller wattage?

Dennis
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Fatbaldingoldgit



Joined: 28 Nov 2011
Posts: 141
Location: Horsham, West Sussex


PostLink    Posted: Sun Apr 22, 2012 9:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Dennis,

As you live in the UK it's much simpler...we only have Live, Neutral and Earth so those instructions don't apply..if you follow the wiring instructions in the thread above everything will work fine...the instructions Kal has in the main web site refer to a 4 wire 120v and 240v system that they have in the US...in the UK it's much less complicated.

As regards building a 5 gallon version of the brewery there are a number of threads that look at this option but I think you will find that:

1. It won't be any cheaper to build a 5 gallon system than a 10 gallon one...and remember that US gallons are really only 8.3 UK gallons so going for a 10 US gallon system isn't that much different from a 5 UK gallon version.
2. You can brew 5 gallons in a 10 gallon system.
3. Fitting UK elements into the kettles would need a different methodology than described in the web site. The fittings are quite different from the US elements.

..../David

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dennisdk2000



Joined: 22 Apr 2012
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PostLink    Posted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 4:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the feedback, David.
As space here is an issue, even making things slightly smaller can be the difference between having the space or not having the space. I'll do some investigating as I'm a while off being ready to build an EB.

Dennis
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crush



Joined: 28 Dec 2010
Posts: 709
Location: Telemark, Norway


PostLink    Posted: Sun Apr 29, 2012 11:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kal, any reason why the neutral goes from the power in directly to the neutral bus, rather than via the relay?
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
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PostLink    Posted: Mon Apr 30, 2012 12:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

crush wrote:
Kal, any reason why the neutral goes from the power in directly to the neutral bus, rather than via the relay?

So that you can turn on the control panel. Wink

(You can't complete the circuit if it only goes through the relay).

Kal

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crush



Joined: 28 Dec 2010
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Location: Telemark, Norway


PostLink    Posted: Mon Apr 30, 2012 6:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kal wrote:
crush wrote:
Kal, any reason why the neutral goes from the power in directly to the neutral bus, rather than via the relay?

So that you can turn on the control panel. Wink

(You can't complete the circuit if it only goes through the relay).

Kal


Haha, yes of course! D'oh! Embarassed It's been while since I wired mine so I forget the details, but that makes sense!

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do_shanahan



Joined: 05 Jun 2012
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PostLink    Posted: Tue Jun 05, 2012 8:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Kal,

I intend to do a simpler implementation of your boiler without the complexity of the control panel providing the power source. I am based in Ireland that uses 220/240v power that is as far as I know the same as the UK (power wise anyway Wink I hope to be able to wire a 3 pin plug on to the Camco #02963 5500W 240VAC ultra low watt density (ULWD) RIPP element for heating in my boiler.

Before I go purchasing the element I was hoping you could help me confirm that my understanding is correct on the wiring so that I don't end up with a fancy paperweight.

My power source socket will have the following wiring
- GROUND (sometimes called EARTH)
- NEUTRAL
- HOT 220-240V (sometimes called LIVE or ACTIVE)

My assumption is that the power supply and element wiring will be the same (Ps is the power supply and S is the socket as shown below).

Ps ground to S ground
Ps neutral to S neutral
Ps live to S live

Many thanks,

Declan
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9494
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, English IPA, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter, Saison

Working on: Kölsch


PostLink    Posted: Tue Jun 05, 2012 9:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

do_shanahan wrote:
Hi Kal,

I intend to do a simpler implementation of your boiler without the complexity of the control panel providing the power source. I am based in Ireland that uses 220/240v power that is as far as I know the same as the UK (power wise anyway Wink I hope to be able to wire a 3 pin plug on to the Camco #02963 5500W 240VAC ultra low watt density (ULWD) RIPP element for heating in my boiler.

Before I go purchasing the element I was hoping you could help me confirm that my understanding is correct on the wiring so that I don't end up with a fancy paperweight.

My power source socket will have the following wiring
- GROUND (sometimes called EARTH)
- NEUTRAL
- HOT 220-240V (sometimes called LIVE or ACTIVE)

My assumption is that the power supply and element wiring will be the same (Ps is the power supply and S is the socket as shown below).

Ps ground to S ground
Ps neutral to S neutral
Ps live to S live

Many thanks,

Declan

Hi Declan,

Having never lived in Ireland I really don't know if you've got this wired correctly. Sorry. This is why in the instructions above I wrote:

"For this reason the exact connection points to use on the 30A/240V power in receptacle are not shown in the diagram blow. Instead, I only label what the wire is for (HOT or NEUTRAL). It is up to the user to ensure that the wires connect up correctly to their wall electrical outlet."

I highly recommend you verify this with an electrician.

You need some way to turn the element on/off. Please don't use the wall socket as a switch. That's way too much power to be turning on/off by simply unplugging the element.

Kal

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do_shanahan



Joined: 05 Jun 2012
Posts: 2



PostLink    Posted: Tue Jun 05, 2012 10:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Kal,

I will of course verify it with an electrician (brother is one). In my previous post I did not mention that the proposed setup will be to use a dedicated power supply that is controlled by its own switch and that has its own circuit breaker. My questions were aimed to ensure that its possible to use this element with a 240v power supply and I think that you have done that.

Thanks for taking the time to respond.

Declan
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kal
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Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, English IPA, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter, Saison

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PostLink    Posted: Tue Jun 05, 2012 10:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Declan,

The 5500W elements can be used anywhere in the world were 220-240V is possible. It's just a question of wiring it up right and having the right gauge wiring, breaker, etc.

You can use them on a 120V circuit too, but the power is 1/4 making it not all that useful in most setups.

Good luck!

Kal

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bazfletch3



Joined: 16 Jan 2014
Posts: 8
Location: Melbourne, Australia


PostLink    Posted: Thu Jan 16, 2014 12:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

crush wrote:
kal wrote:
crush wrote:
Kal, any reason why the neutral goes from the power in directly to the neutral bus, rather than via the relay?

So that you can turn on the control panel. Wink

(You can't complete the circuit if it only goes through the relay).

Kal


Haha, yes of course! D'oh! Embarassed It's been while since I wired mine so I forget the details, but that makes sense!



Ok, I know this is a dumb question (and its my first post so be nice!), but why does the neutral feed loop to the relay prior to feeding the neutral bus? We're only switching the active/hot arent we?

Cheers

Barry (and "HI", nice to meet everyone!)

Smile
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