Return to TheElectricBrewery.com
Home ]   [ Products ]   [ Recipes ]   [ Testimonials ]   [ Gallery ]   [ FAQ ]   [ What's New ]   [ About / Contact  ]   [ Newsletter ]

Log inLog in   RegisterRegister   User Control PanelUser Control Panel   Private MessagesPrivate Messages   MembershipClub Memberships   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   Photo AlbumsPhoto Albums   Forum FAQForum FAQ

Russian Imperial Stout (batch #172)
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic   Printer-friendly view    TheElectricBrewery.com Forum Index -> Recipes & Ingredients
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 7122
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Pale Ale (sessionable), Mild, NEIPA, Schwarzbier, Altbier, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: NEIPA, Belgian Saison, Kölsch


PostLink    Posted: Wed Aug 13, 2014 8:54 pm    Post subject: Russian Imperial Stout (batch #172) Reply with quote


        Register to remove this ad. It's free!

Our Russian Imperial Stout. Image (c) TheElectricBrewery.com

Our Russian Imperial Stout is a rich, deep, intensely flavoured full bodied ale. It has rich dark malt flavours that includes roasty, dry chocolate, slightly burnt, and almost tar-like sensations. Complex dark fruit flavours such as plum, raisin and prune exist as well. The colour is jet black and the alcohol level is high at 10.6% ABV. This is a sipping beer, one with rich/luxurious depth, that can be aged for years.

Throughout the 18th century, porter and its offspring, stout, were at the height of their popularity in England. It is said that Peter the Great fell in love with these beers during his 1698 trip to England, and he requested that some be sent to the Imperial court in Russia. Much to the embarrassment of the English, the beer spoiled somewhere along its thousand-mile journey.

Barclay brewery of London came to the rescue by rapidly increasing the amount of alcohol and hops for their second effort. The result was an inky black concoction with enough warmth and complexity to immediately become a sensation throughout Russia. Russian Imperial Stout was born and quickly became popular throughout European Russia. It is said that Empress Catherine the Great (1729-1796) was very much a fan of Imperial Stout as was Rasputin (1869-1916).


Old Rasputin Russian Imperial Stout by North Coast Brewing Company. Image (c) flickr.com

The style was regularly brewed in the 18th and early 19th century, and has enjoyed a resurgence the last few years with the rise of microbreweries. Today it is a popular style with American craft brewers who have extended the style with unique American characteristics.

Our recipe here is decidedly American as it uses clean fermenting Chico yeast (White Labs WLP001, Wyeast 1056, or Fermentis Safale US-05) and includes generous amounts of roasted malt along with a healthy dose of clean high alpha hops near the end of the boil. Chocolate malt and Weyermann Carafa III Special (a unique de-husked version that reduces astringency and provides a smooth bitterness) are used to provide a noticeable chocolate-like character. Some crystal is added as well for a slight sweetness.


Imperial Russian Stout by Stone Brewing Company. Image (c) selectism.com

While this beer is fine served on regular CO2 (keep the carbonation level very low, no more than 1.6 to 1.8 volumes of CO2 to minimize carbonic bite and let the hop/malt flavour come through), I find it's even better when served on a stout faucet pushed by 30/70 CO2/Nitrogen blend to get a nice creamy head and close to flat beer. This is a personal preference so choose whichever method you prefer. One cheap and inexpensive way to (sort of) mimic a Nitro pour is to use a syringe. Pour the beer as you would normally and then suck up a syringe full and force it back into the beer, hard. Repeat 2-3 times and you'll knock most of the CO2 out of solution leaving a nearly flat beer with a creamy head. Not quite the same texture, but it gets you part ways there. I tried this for years before I finally added real CO2/Nitrogen serving setup.

While many strong beers need some time to age and mellow, this one is surprisingly smooth after only a few weeks of conditioning. It was kegged after 24 days and then stored in the conditioning fridge and held near freezing for an additional 25 days before being placed on tap. After only a month of conditioning, the beer is not hot or solvent at all, as can sometimes be the case for strong beers that are consumed too young. There's a wonderful chocolate/roast character, some dried fruit sweetness (mostly raisins), and an incredibly full/lush/velvet finish. While the bitterness level (IBU) is reasonably high, the amount of malt flavour helps keep the hops in check. There is not much hop presence at all (which was the intent). This is a beer that will keep well for many years and slowly age and change over time. If you bottle, tuck away a few and try one every year for the next 10+ years.

Photos/videos from my brew day:


While mashing our Russian Imperial Stout the 20 gallon mash tun (middle kettle) is nearly full. Image (c) TheElectricBrewery.com


Video: Mashing the Russian Imperial Stout. Video (c) TheElectricBrewery.com.


Video: Boiling the Russian Imperial Stout. Video (c) TheElectricBrewery.com.

I first brewed this on June 11, 2014 (batch #172). Brew up a batch and let me know how you like it!

Interested in seeing what we're brewing right now? Follow our Instagram feed for pictures and videos of our brewing activities as they happen.

Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!


Russian Imperial Stout

Size: 12.0 US gal (post-boil @ 68F)
Efficiency: 88% (lower due to the high gravity)
Attenuation: 79.0%
Calories: 336 kcal per 12.0 fl oz

Original Gravity: 1.100 (1.075 - 1.115)
Terminal Gravity: 1.021 (1.018 - 1.030)
Color: 30.6 (30.0 - 40.0)
Alcohol: 10.6% (8.0% - 12.0%)
Bitterness: 86 (50.0 - 90.0)

Ingredients:
31.5 lb Domestic 2-Row Malt (81.5%)
2.9 lb Munich TYPE II Malt (9L) (7.5%)
1.0 lb Roasted Barley (500L) (2.6%)
1.0 lb Chocolate Malt (2.6%)
12 oz Weyermann Carafa III Special Malt (525L) (1.9%)
12 oz Weyermann Caramunich Type III Malt (57L) (1.9%)
12 oz Weyermann CaraAroma Malt (130L) (1.9%)
3.0 oz Magnum Hops (14.8%) - added during boil, boiled 90 min [69.3 IBU]
1.5 oz Magnum Hops (14.8%) - added during boil, boiled 15 min [16.6 IBU]
1 Whirlfloc Tablet (Irish moss) - added during boil, boiled 15 min
60 g Fermentis Safale US-05 dry yeast

Notes:
Add 625mg potassium metabisulphite to 25 gallons water to remove chlorine/chloramine (as required).
(Given the high amount of grain used and longer boil time, with 20 gallon kettles you will need to fill the HLT and MLT separately with water).
Water treated with brewing salts to: Ca=50, Mg=10, Na=16, Cl=70, S04=70
1.25 qt/lb mash thickness. Single infusion mash at 150F for 90 mins. Mashout to 168F and hold for 10 mins.
60-90 min fly sparge with ~6 pH water. Collect 15.8 gallons (@68F) in the boil kettle.
Boil for 120 minutes. Lid on at flameout, start chilling immediately.
Cool wort to 64-66F and aerate extremely well. Pure oxygen from a tank can help. Aerate again ~12 hours after pitching.
Ferment at 64-66F for the first week or so, then raise to 70F and keep there for another week. This beer should take a good 2-3 weeks to ferment out. Don't rush it.
Rack to brite tank (secondary)*, crash chill to near freezing (if possible), add 1 tsp of unflavoured gelatin dissolved in a cup of hot distilled water per 5 gallons of beer, and let clear for 2-3 days.
See above for recommendations on carbonation/packaging.

*After racking to the brite tank (secondary), I like to mimic a bourbon barrel aged taste by adding two ounces of American medium toast oak cubes that were soaked in bourbon for a few weeks directly into the brite tank with the beer. These get left in for ~21 days at room temperature and then the beer is kegged (taken off the oak). No gelatin required as it will have dropped clear over the ~21 days. The resulting beer after a few months of aging is a subtle toasted oak/bourbon flavour as you would get with bourbon barrel aging without all the complexities of barrel management. More information on using oak in beer.


Soaking American medium toast oak cubes in bourbon.

If you prefer to use liquid yeast, either of these is an excellent choice as they are the same clean fermenting Chico strain as US-05:

Wyeast 1056 American Ale
White Labs WLP-001 California Ale

You'll need to use 8 packs/vials or make an appropriate starter. For more information see Chapter 6 of How to Brew and Appendix A of Brewing Classic Styles.

For complete brewing instructions, see our Brew Day: Step by Step guide.

Brew yourself a batch today and let us know how you like it! Enjoy!

Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!

SEE OUR OTHER RECIPES »

Kal

_________________
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0


Last edited by kal on Fri Oct 14, 2016 3:19 pm; edited 19 times in total
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
rafinus



Joined: 04 Oct 2012
Posts: 1



PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 15, 2014 5:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Kal, thats great.

Could you provide a beer smith file?
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 7122
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Pale Ale (sessionable), Mild, NEIPA, Schwarzbier, Altbier, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: NEIPA, Belgian Saison, Kölsch


PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 15, 2014 5:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I cannot as I do not use beersmith.

Everyone's efficiency is different so you'll have to adjust for your specific setup as well.

Kal

_________________
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
huhwha



Joined: 10 May 2013
Posts: 66



PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 15, 2014 7:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sounds great! I just finished making my first RIS. Hydrometer sample was great. Most of it is aging in a bourbon barrel now. I'll check it in two months.
Your point about drinkability is well made. This is one I think you can enjoy relatively soon and also cellar some over the years. I'll bet it's incredible after three years!
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 7122
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Pale Ale (sessionable), Mild, NEIPA, Schwarzbier, Altbier, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: NEIPA, Belgian Saison, Kölsch


PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 15, 2014 7:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cool! Aging in old barrels be interesting - something to try for next time (or I could just rack an uncarb'ed keg of beer right in there and leave it for a while...)

Kal

_________________
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0


Last edited by kal on Sun Aug 24, 2014 2:07 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
matto



Joined: 05 Dec 2013
Posts: 8
Location: Sydney, Australia


PostLink    Posted: Sat Aug 16, 2014 9:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Kal, this one looks nice. Quick question about the 2hr boil. What is the rationale for that? Is it to help get the gravity up where you want it? Or does it have to do with the grain bill -- somewhat like the 90min boil when using pilsner malt?

thanks for info
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 7122
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Pale Ale (sessionable), Mild, NEIPA, Schwarzbier, Altbier, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: NEIPA, Belgian Saison, Kölsch


PostLink    Posted: Sat Aug 16, 2014 2:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

matto wrote:
Hi Kal, this one looks nice. Quick question about the 2hr boil. What is the rationale for that? Is it to help get the gravity up where you want it? Or does it have to do with the grain bill -- somewhat like the 90min boil when using pilsner malt?

Correct with helping get the gravity up where we want it: There's so much grain and strike water and therefore so little sparge water that you leave a lot of sugars behind when sparging high gravity beers. This is true for any brewing setup. Boiling longer forces us to collect a lot more wort which means we need to sparge longer which means we extract more sugars from the grain. Some people are known to do 4+ hour boils for a RIS or a barley wine (both very high gravity beers, often over 10% ABV).

If you do a 60 min boil then your efficiency will be lower as you're going to use less sparge water and leave some sugars behind, which means you'd need more grain (and strike water) and again conversely less sparge water.

Longer boils also help build up the malty caramel flavors in the beer (helps bring out the dark fruit, rich caramel and toffee flavors that you get out of some malts). This is what "everyone says" but I really have my doubts about how much of a difference longer boils make to the flavour. One day I'd like to put that to the test to see....

Nothing to do with removing SMM (the precursor to DMS) like is usually done when using large amounts of pilsner malt in a beer. (I always boil beers that have lots of pilsner malt vigorously for 90+ minutes).

Kal

_________________
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0


Last edited by kal on Tue Jan 06, 2015 3:11 pm; edited 2 times in total
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
foomench



Joined: 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 709
Location: Longmont, CO

Drinking: Ohm Pale Ale

Working on: I.Stout in a Bourbon barrel, Bier de Garde in a wine barrel, brown for an Avery barrel


PostLink    Posted: Mon Aug 18, 2014 10:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kal wrote:
Longer boils also help build up the malty caramel flavors in the beer (helps bring out the dark fruit, rich caramel and toffee flavors that you get out of some malts). This is what "everyone says" but I really have my doubts about how much of a difference longer boils make to the flavour. One day I'd like to put that to the test to see....

I think that is also dependent on the boil kettle and heat source.

_________________
Brewery equipment photos (et al) here: https://picasaweb.google.com/114861423235799103704
Back to top
Kevin59



Joined: 03 Aug 2012
Posts: 1050
Location: Fort Collins, CO

Drinking: Imperial Brown Ale

Working on: Oatmeal Stout, IPA


PostLink    Posted: Mon Aug 18, 2014 10:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sounds great Kal - it's now on my short term "to brew" list...

Just curious if you could offer a taste comparison to the Old Rasputin? I know that one's not aged for very long before it hits distribution. It's often available at my favorite beer bar here in Fort Collins, and in fact they had it on nitro last week for the first time.

Thanks!

Kevin
Back to top
View user's photo album (6 photos)
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 7122
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Pale Ale (sessionable), Mild, NEIPA, Schwarzbier, Altbier, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: NEIPA, Belgian Saison, Kölsch


PostLink    Posted: Mon Aug 18, 2014 10:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

foomench wrote:
kal wrote:
Longer boils also help build up the malty caramel flavors in the beer (helps bring out the dark fruit, rich caramel and toffee flavors that you get out of some malts). This is what "everyone says" but I really have my doubts about how much of a difference longer boils make to the flavour. One day I'd like to put that to the test to see....

I think that is also dependent on the boil kettle and heat source.

Yup - could be!

Kevin59 wrote:
Just curious if you could offer a taste comparison to the Old Rasputin?

I'm afraid I've never tried it! (or the Stone one I show as well). They're simply known popular RIS beers. Neither is available where I live (Ottawa Canada) unfortunately. Now if someone wants to send me a bottle or two I'll be sure to write a full report. Wink

Part of the reasons I got into all-grain brewing was to be able to make what I wanted as the options here are extremely limited.

Kal

_________________
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
TheGecko



Joined: 10 Mar 2014
Posts: 50



PostLink    Posted: Wed Oct 08, 2014 7:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

(Given the high amount of grain used and longer boil time, with 20 gallon kettles you will need to fill the HLT and MLT separately with water).


Hi Kal - Very excited to brew the RIS this Saturday! Just had a questions about the process considering the high gravity/volume of grain:

1. Assume I need 12 gallons of strike water. I should add 12 gallons of water the MLT, and also add sparge water to the HLT, and get the temp up to 150 in both tanks before doughing in, right?

2. Did you/should I consider raising strike temp a bit higher than 150 considering the high amount of grain? In other words, did you see heat transfer reduced appreciably from this batch versus a lower gravity batch? Did it take substantially longer to get the mash to return to target temp?

Will report back on this one... looks like a great recipe!

Cheers,
Drew

_________________
Drew
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 7122
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Pale Ale (sessionable), Mild, NEIPA, Schwarzbier, Altbier, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: NEIPA, Belgian Saison, Kölsch


PostLink    Posted: Wed Oct 08, 2014 9:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TheGecko wrote:
(Given the high amount of grain used and longer boil time, with 20 gallon kettles you will need to fill the HLT and MLT separately with water).


Hi Kal - Very excited to brew the RIS this Saturday! Just had a questions about the process considering the high gravity/volume of grain:

1. Assume I need 12 gallons of strike water. I should add 12 gallons of water the MLT, and also add sparge water to the HLT, and get the temp up to 150 in both tanks before doughing in, right?

Correct. Strike water goes in the MLT, then put enough sparge water in the HLT for what you need (with maybe a gallon or two extra just in case) or enough to at least cover the HERMS coil - whichever of the two is more.

The recirc both the HLT and the MLT water per our BREW DAY STEP BY STEP instructions while the HLT heats up. The MLT will heat up at the same time as heat transfers from the HLT to the MLT.

Quote:
2. Did you/should I consider raising strike temp a bit higher than 150 considering the high amount of grain? In other words, did you see heat transfer reduced appreciably from this batch versus a lower gravity batch? Did it take substantially longer to get the mash to return to target temp?

It does take longer to heat given the large amount of grain but I don't usually bother heating the strike/sparge water higher as I haven't found that the results of holding the grain at a lower temp for a (reasonably) short period of time has produced a too-fermentable wort for me. 150F is pretty low and given that it's a very high gravity beer, we want to mash somewhat low. That's the caveat of high gravity beers: They're usually mashed much lower anyway, and the lower the mash temp the longer it takes for the starches to convert to sugar too.

If I was making something that was to be mashed much higher (156F? 158F?) then maybe I'd try setting the HLT ~5-8 degrees higher to split the difference and get a faster ramp up to mash temp. Not sure what sort of beer that would be - maybe some sort of very lower gravity beer where you want some more body to it to avoid it finishing off too dry.

Quote:
Will report back on this one... looks like a great recipe!


Let us know how it works out!

Kal

_________________
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
TheGecko



Joined: 10 Mar 2014
Posts: 50



PostLink    Posted: Mon Oct 13, 2014 5:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Brewed the RIS on Saturday. It was a long brew day with the 90 minute mash and 2 hour boil. Also takes quite a bit of time to get all that strike/sparge water up to temp, but that's not a big deal. I actually heated the strike water to 160 and mashed in there. As I recirculated, mash temp started at 148 and didn't take long to bring temp to 150. I then added a couple quarts of room temp water to the HLT after mashing in to stable HLT temp at 150.

This was by far the biggest grain bill I've used and I was a little concerned about a potential stuck mash using almost 40 lb grain and mashing at a thick ratio of 1.25 qt/lb. The Blichmann false bottom, however, is a champ and was up to the task. Great circulation, very good conversion. Preboil conversion efficiency was 95%, which I anticipated coming in lower. Very pleased.

Draining kettle was a little challenging. First carboy was simple. Moving to second, the wort stopped flowing with 3 gallons of wort left... I'm not happy with the hop stopper, and will likely be investing in a spider. I was running the wort into carboy at a snail pace, and have read up on tips, but no dice. Ended up dumping remaining 3 gallons of wort into a sanitized bucket and placed in chest freezer until it got to 66 F, then added to carboy and pitched.

12 gallons of 1.096 RIS fermenting away @ 66 now. Color/aroma of wort is great, and was very thick just like you'd expect from a RIS.

Can't wait to sample and report back in a couple months. Cheers!

_________________
Drew
Back to top
Kevin59



Joined: 03 Aug 2012
Posts: 1050
Location: Fort Collins, CO

Drinking: Imperial Brown Ale

Working on: Oatmeal Stout, IPA


PostLink    Posted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 9:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TheGecko wrote:
I'm not happy with the hop stopper, and will likely be investing in a spider.


Buy a hop spider for sure, you'll be happy you did!!! (Shameless plug for Zach & Stainless Brewing - http://www.stainlessbrewing.com/Hop-Spider-with-seam-welds_p_158.html)

Congrats on the brew - hope it tastes excellent!

Cheers!
Back to top
View user's photo album (6 photos)
mtpratt



Joined: 20 Oct 2014
Posts: 1



PostLink    Posted: Mon Oct 20, 2014 9:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey Kal

When you do a longer boil for a higher gravity beer, do you still need to adjust your mash efficiency to compensate for the lower efficiency?

Thanks and love the website
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 7122
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Pale Ale (sessionable), Mild, NEIPA, Schwarzbier, Altbier, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: NEIPA, Belgian Saison, Kölsch


PostLink    Posted: Mon Oct 20, 2014 11:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mtpratt wrote:
When you do a longer boil for a higher gravity beer, do you still need to adjust your mash efficiency to compensate for the lower efficiency?

In theory you could boil long enough that you wouldn't have to, but here with a 2 hour boil you do. That is why the efficiency in the recipe is listed as 88% (even though it's a 120 min boil) while most others are 95%. If we didn't boil 2 hours, the efficiency would be lower than 88%.

Kal

_________________
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0


Last edited by kal on Mon Oct 27, 2014 8:28 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
jbrace1



Joined: 21 Feb 2014
Posts: 42
Location: Minnetonka

Drinking: Saison de Sol, Summer Noon, Labor Day Pale Ale, Cold Press Coffee


PostLink    Posted: Mon Oct 27, 2014 7:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Brewed the RIS last Tuesday. I only have a 15 gallon MT so I had to do an even thicker mash (1.1 qts/lb) but everything worked out great. I hit 1.097 after the 2 hour boil. Gravity was down to 1.040 yesterday and tastes wonderful!
Back to top
View user's photo album (20 photos)
TheGecko



Joined: 10 Mar 2014
Posts: 50



PostLink    Posted: Fri Oct 31, 2014 6:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TheGecko wrote:
Brewed the RIS on Saturday. It was a long brew day with the 90 minute mash and 2 hour boil. Also takes quite a bit of time to get all that strike/sparge water up to temp, but that's not a big deal. I actually heated the strike water to 160 and mashed in there. As I recirculated, mash temp started at 148 and didn't take long to bring temp to 150. I then added a couple quarts of room temp water to the HLT after mashing in to stable HLT temp at 150.

This was by far the biggest grain bill I've used and I was a little concerned about a potential stuck mash using almost 40 lb grain and mashing at a thick ratio of 1.25 qt/lb. The Blichmann false bottom, however, is a champ and was up to the task. Great circulation, very good conversion. Preboil conversion efficiency was 95%, which I anticipated coming in lower. Very pleased.

Draining kettle was a little challenging. First carboy was simple. Moving to second, the wort stopped flowing with 3 gallons of wort left... I'm not happy with the hop stopper, and will likely be investing in a spider. I was running the wort into carboy at a snail pace, and have read up on tips, but no dice. Ended up dumping remaining 3 gallons of wort into a sanitized bucket and placed in chest freezer until it got to 66 F, then added to carboy and pitched.

12 gallons of 1.096 RIS fermenting away @ 66 now. Color/aroma of wort is great, and was very thick just like you'd expect from a RIS.

Can't wait to sample and report back in a couple months. Cheers!


Hey guys - Thought I would come back and give you my update:

So final gravity on my RIS was 1.023, coming in at 9.3% ABV. The gravity sample tasted simply outstanding. I cannot believe how much complexity there is, especially given it's just under 3 weeks old. Totally agree with Kal that this RIS will be great in much less time than I am accustomed to aging stouts... but I am also excited to see how it changes over the years. 5 gallons going on my nitro tap, and 5 gallons dedicated to bombers and shoved away in the cellar for at least a year. This is an amazing beer, Kal! Well done, sir.

Mug

_________________
Drew
Back to top
Browningbuck



Joined: 26 Oct 2014
Posts: 26



PostLink    Posted: Mon Nov 17, 2014 3:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well you always see the good posts and successes, but it is seldom people are brave enough to post the not so good results. however lessons learned and posts for posterity help the community and i wish i saw more of them. that being said our RIS this weekend went great up until sparging. we had friends over and we were'nt paying attention to the speed at which we were collecting off the mash tun and in only 20-30 min we had our preboil volume.... as most would guess our specific grav was much lower than what it should have been. with the upset in mind and thinking about the mess up, we started the boil, compounding the issue at hand the hops containers with our marked drop in times were reused from the last batch (which was a total 90 min boil compared to this 120) so the 90 min container stated "90 min start of boil". With our thoughts still on the specific gravity and the amount of sugars that had been wasted after fooping and start of boil i dumped in the "start of boil hops" which obviously went in 30 min too early. the end result of the day was an original grav of 1.067 and a stout that might be a bit more bitter than smooth.

the reason im wanting to post this is really for the greater good and a reminder to STAY FOCUSED. so my lessons learned are: keep distractions at bay (brew day is BREW DAY not social hour, at least for me), Dont reuse labels an extra 10 secs to relabel the hops is worth the time, and finally a pun... DONT RUSSIAN IT!


anyway well see what happens after ferm and some light ageing. We wont be hanging on to this one for a year like we anticipated but we will drink the hell out of it no matter what Smile
Back to top
foomench



Joined: 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 709
Location: Longmont, CO

Drinking: Ohm Pale Ale

Working on: I.Stout in a Bourbon barrel, Bier de Garde in a wine barrel, brown for an Avery barrel


PostLink    Posted: Mon Nov 17, 2014 9:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Browningbuck wrote:
we had friends over and we were'nt paying attention to the speed at which we were collecting off the mash tun and in only 20-30 min we had our preboil volume.... as most would guess our specific grav was much lower than what it should have been.

Did you think about running that through the grain bed again?

_________________
Brewery equipment photos (et al) here: https://picasaweb.google.com/114861423235799103704
Back to top
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic   Printer-friendly view    TheElectricBrewery.com Forum Index -> Recipes & Ingredients All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Page 1 of 4
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Support our site by purchasing through this link. We thank you!

Forum powered by phpBB © phpBB Group