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Bell's Hopslam Imperial IPA (batch #140)
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 6165
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Mexican Lager, ESB, Mild, Citra Double IPA, Schwarzbier, Electric Pale Ale, Russian Imperial Stout, Irish Red Ale

Working on: Altbier, Light Lager, Electric Pale Ale (Sessionable)


PostLink    Posted: Fri Jun 21, 2013 8:42 pm    Post subject: Bell's Hopslam Imperial IPA (batch #140) Reply with quote


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Photo (c) Bell's Brewery

Testimonials:

"I have to say that in all my years of brewing, it is the best batch, hands down, that I have ever brewed! I followed the recipe (including adjusting the my water) and the final product was simply amazing: Wonderful piney, dank, citrus, grapefruit on the nose, amazingly full body with a true "hop slam" on the palate, and a surprisingly dry finish for such a big beer. Thanks for sharing your recipe, Kal... this one is a winner!" - Veritas

----------

Bell's Hopslam is yet another Imperial IPA that brewers have been trying to clone for years, and (as far as we can tell) no official recipe has ever been provided by the brewery. While I wouldn't call the recipe below an exact clone, I find that it comes very close. If you enjoy the commercial version, you'll definitely enjoy this beer.

Hopslam is a bit higher in alcohol than Pliny the Elder but the hops are not quite as intense.

To quote the Bell's Brewery Hopslam page:

Quote:
Starting with six different hop varietals added to the brew kettle & culminating with a massive dry-hop addition of Simcoe hops, Bell's Hopslam Ale possesses the most complex hopping schedule in the Bell's repertoire. Selected specifically because of their aromatic qualities, these Pacific Northwest varieties contribute a pungent blend of grapefruit, stone fruit, and floral notes. A generous malt bill and a solid dollop of honey provide just enough body to keep the balance in check, resulting in a remarkably drinkable rendition of the Double India Pale Ale style.

It is one of the few beers to score 100 on both RateBeer and BeerAdvocate.

I brewed this for the first time on April 7, 2012 and then again in late 2012 making slight adjustments to recipe (shown here). In early 2013, a sampling was donated to a local team of homebrewers studying for the Beer Judge Certification Program. I'm told they deemed it the best IIPA of the group, rated against many other homebrewed and commercial IIPA examples they were studying that evening.

Brew up a batch and let me know how you like it!

Interested in seeing what we're brewing right now? Follow our Instagram feed for pictures and videos of our brewing activities as they happen.

Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!


Bell's Hopslam Imperial IPA (batch #140)

Size: 12.0 gal (post-boil)
Efficiency: 93.0%
Attenuation: 86.2%
Calories: 287 kcal per 12.0 fl oz

Original Gravity: 1.087 (1.075 - 1.090)
Terminal Gravity: 1.012 (1.010 - 1.020)
Color: 7.3 (8.0 - 15.0)
Alcohol: 9.9% (7.5% - 10.0%)
Bitterness: 161 (60.0 - 120.0)

Ingredients:
23.75 lb Domestic 2-Row Malt (78.2%)
3.0 lb Weyermann Vienna Malt (9.9%)
1.0 lb Crystal Malt 40L (3.3%)
2.625 lb Honey or Regular White Table Sugar/Sucrose (8.6%) - add in the last 10 minutes of the boil
2.0 oz Columbus Hops (12.3%) - added first wort*, boiled 60 min [38.4 IBU]
2.0 oz Simcoe Hops (12.2%) - added during boil, boiled 60 min [38.1 IBU]
2.0 oz Chinook Hops (11.4%) - added during boil, boiled 45 min [30.6 IBU]
2.0 oz Centennial Hops (11.1%) - added during boil, boiled 30 min [24.9 IBU]
2.0 oz Citra Hops (11.1%) - added during boil, boiled 15 min [16.6 IBU]
1 Whirlfloc Tablet (Irish moss) - added during boil, boiled 15 min
2.0 oz Amarillo Hops (10.1%) - added during boil, boiled 10 min [12.6 IBU]
4.0 oz Amarillo Hops (10.1%) - added during boil, boiled 0 min
4.0 oz Simcoe Hops (12.2%) - added during boil, boiled 0 min
48 g Fermentis Safale US-05 dry yeast
6.0 oz Simcoe Hops (12.2%) - added dry to secondary fermenter

*First wort hops are added to the boil kettle while you're sparging (before the wort is boiled). For IBU calculations, first wort hopping is said to be similar to a 20 minute addition.

Notes:
Add 500mg potassium metabisulphite to 20 gallons water to remove chlorine/chloramine (as required).
Water treated with brewing salts to: Ca=110, Mg=18, Na=16, Cl=50, S04=278
(Basically Randy Mosher's ideal Pale Ale numbers with slightly less Sulphate).
1.25 qt/lb mash thickness. Single infusion mash at 150F for 90 mins (or even 120). Mashout to 168F.
60-90 min fly sparge with ~6 pH water. Collect 13.9 gallons in the boil kettle.
Boil for 60 minutes. Lid on at flameout, start chilling immediately.
Cool wort to 66F and aerate well. Ferment at 66-68F until complete.
Add dry hops once fermentation is nearing completion (ie: below 1.015). Dry hop for 7-10 days total.
Rack to brite tank (secondary), crash chill to near freezing (if possible), add 1 tsp of unflavoured gelatin dissolved in a cup of hot distilled water per 5 gallons of beer, and let clear for 2-3 days.
Package as you would normally. I keg and carbonate on the low side (around 2 to 2.2 volumes of C02) to minimize carbonic bite and let the hop/malt flavour come through.

If you prefer to use liquid yeast, either of these is an excellent choice as they are the same clean fermenting Chico strain as US-05:

Wyeast 1056 American Ale
White Labs WLP-001 California Ale

You'll need to use 6 packs/vials or make an appropriate starter. For more information see Chapter 6 of How to Brew and Appendix A of Brewing Classic Styles.

For complete brewing instructions, see our Brew Day: Step by Step guide.

Enjoy!

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SEE OUR OTHER RECIPES

Kal

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Last edited by kal on Wed May 18, 2016 6:53 pm; edited 20 times in total
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perogi



Joined: 12 Feb 2012
Posts: 713
Location: NH

Drinking: Perogi's Pale Ale, Edwort's Apfelwein, Black Pumpkin (Shipyard Pumpkin and Guinness Layered)

Working on: Rebuilding my brewery during a major renovation


PostLink    Posted: Fri Jun 21, 2013 9:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kal - did you actually make this one?

Has anyone personally drank it?
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 6165
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Mexican Lager, ESB, Mild, Citra Double IPA, Schwarzbier, Electric Pale Ale, Russian Imperial Stout, Irish Red Ale

Working on: Altbier, Light Lager, Electric Pale Ale (Sessionable)


PostLink    Posted: Fri Jun 21, 2013 9:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Of course! I don't post any recipes I haven't personally made myself that worked out well.

I've made it twice now, first time on Apr 7, 2012 (batch #140) and then again on Dec 9, 2012 (batch #150), with slight alterations between batches. I've tried the commercial beer as well and liked mine better (found it fresher).

I've personally drank it myself, along with many other hop-head friends. Wink

Kal

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snowtiger87



Joined: 28 Sep 2011
Posts: 35
Location: Denver, CO (No longer Afghanistan)


PostLink    Posted: Wed Jul 03, 2013 7:11 pm    Post subject: Honey huh? Reply with quote

So Bell's actually uses honey and not table sugar in the recipe? I suppose they both serve the same purpose - to dry the beer out some.
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 6165
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Mexican Lager, ESB, Mild, Citra Double IPA, Schwarzbier, Electric Pale Ale, Russian Imperial Stout, Irish Red Ale

Working on: Altbier, Light Lager, Electric Pale Ale (Sessionable)


PostLink    Posted: Wed Jul 03, 2013 7:21 pm    Post subject: Re: Honey huh? Reply with quote

snowtiger87 wrote:
So Bell's actually uses honey and not table sugar in the recipe?

That is my understanding.

Quote:
I suppose they both serve the same purpose - to dry the beer out some.

Correct.

It's not uncommon for high gravity beers (IIPAs, Belgians Tripels, Barley wines, etc) to use some amount of 100% fermentables to avoid the final gravity from being too high.

Kal

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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 6165
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Mexican Lager, ESB, Mild, Citra Double IPA, Schwarzbier, Electric Pale Ale, Russian Imperial Stout, Irish Red Ale

Working on: Altbier, Light Lager, Electric Pale Ale (Sessionable)


PostLink    Posted: Sat Jan 18, 2014 1:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting advertising for Hopslam that puts things in perspective:



This ad confuses me a bit however: 7.2 cases is 24 x 7.2 = 172.8 beers.

Hopslam, according to our recipe is 161 IBU. That would mean that the average light beer they're referring to is only 0.9 IBU? (161 bitterness / 172.8 beers). That can't be right... it's likely off by a factor of 10. Meaning that the recipe here should have 10 times the hops (?)

They say that IBU numbers above 100 are somewhat meaningless and break down above 100, but I would find it hard to believe that Bells uses enough hops to bring Hopslam to the equivalent of 1600 IBU.

Kal

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Last edited by kal on Fri Feb 28, 2014 2:42 am; edited 3 times in total
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Ben58



Joined: 14 Aug 2011
Posts: 390
Location: Hamilton, Ontario


PostLink    Posted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 1:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just got a 6 pack of Two Hearted Ale. I'm going to culture up the yeast from the dregs. I've got plans for some clones, including Hopslam.
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biglakewill



Joined: 30 Dec 2012
Posts: 65
Location: MA/MN


PostLink    Posted: Mon Jan 20, 2014 9:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This ale is one of the reasons I returned to home brewing. I hope to make this the third brew in my new system.

1. Electric Pale Ale - being dry hoped now

2. Janet's Brown Ale - this weekend if I don't have to travel

3. Hopslam - soon to follow

CaptWill
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BlueBridge



Joined: 05 Mar 2014
Posts: 4



PostLink    Posted: Wed Mar 05, 2014 3:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Recipe looks great, but isn't Hopslam more like 68 IBU? Bell's has said themselves that it's much lower than people think. Ratebeer.com has it listed at 70 IBU. 161 sounds crazy high.
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 6165
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Mexican Lager, ESB, Mild, Citra Double IPA, Schwarzbier, Electric Pale Ale, Russian Imperial Stout, Irish Red Ale

Working on: Altbier, Light Lager, Electric Pale Ale (Sessionable)


PostLink    Posted: Wed Mar 05, 2014 4:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BlueBridge wrote:
Recipe looks great, but isn't Hopslam more like 68 IBU? Bell's has said themselves that it's much lower than people think. Ratebeer.com has it listed at 70 IBU. 161 sounds crazy high.


Not sure - I don't place much faith in calculated IBU numbers once you get above 50-60, especially when there's lots of late hops and processes like FWH or steeping.

Looking at the recipe again in beer tools pro, I realize that this software treats FWH as a full 60 min boil when in fact in the "real world" a FWH adds bittering similar to a ~20 min addition. This drops the IBU down to the 140's.

Then there are a huge load of late hops in this and depending on which IBU curve you use for calculations, the numbers can vary greatly.

I've seen clone recipes with IBUs that range from 93 to 160. These are all "calculated" IBUs. If you are to send this beer to lab it'll actually measure a lot lower as all bets are off with anything over 50-60, and definitely over 100.

I basically don't care or place any stock in IBU numbers for any very hoppy beers like a DIPA.

Kal

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Last edited by kal on Thu Oct 02, 2014 6:42 pm; edited 1 time in total
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foomench



Joined: 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 709
Location: Longmont, CO

Drinking: Ohm Pale Ale

Working on: I.Stout in a Bourbon barrel, Bier de Garde in a wine barrel, brown for an Avery barrel


PostLink    Posted: Wed Mar 05, 2014 6:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kal wrote:
This ad confuses me a bit however: 7.2 cases is 24 x 7.2 = 172.8 beers.

Hopslam, according to our recipe is 161 IBU. That would mean that the average light beer they're referring to is only 0.9 IBU? (161 bitterness / 172.8 beers). That can't be right... it's likely off by a factor of 10. Meaning that the recipe here should have 10 times the hops (?)

They didn't claim 172.8x IBUs, but "amount of hops." Since there aren't any actual hops in the finished product, but components extracted from the hops, I take their claim to mean that they use 172.8 times as much in making the beer. A lot of that could be late hop additions for which IBUs are not extracted, but other components (flavor and aroma) are. And the "popular light beer" could be using hop extracts as well, further reducing its "amount of hops." I could argue the extracts should be counted based on the input hops, which will still give a lower amount because the extraction process is more efficient than a boil with wort; should be counted just on the amount of extract; or aren't hops at all.

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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 6165
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Mexican Lager, ESB, Mild, Citra Double IPA, Schwarzbier, Electric Pale Ale, Russian Imperial Stout, Irish Red Ale

Working on: Altbier, Light Lager, Electric Pale Ale (Sessionable)


PostLink    Posted: Wed Mar 05, 2014 6:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good points foomench - that's probably exactly where it comes from.

I don't doubt that HopSlam has a ton more hops in it than a typical light beer - just wasn't sure on where the math comes from.

Kal

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BlueBridge



Joined: 05 Mar 2014
Posts: 4



PostLink    Posted: Wed Mar 05, 2014 7:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Rack to brite tank (secondary), crash chill to near freezing (if possible), add 1 tsp of unflavoured gelatine dissolved in a cup of hot distilled water per 5 gallons of beer, and let clear for 2-3 days


Can you clarify your crash chilling process? I notice you do this in several recipes. How long do you hold it in the brite tank at this temperature? You add the gelatine during this time?

Thanks!
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 6165
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Mexican Lager, ESB, Mild, Citra Double IPA, Schwarzbier, Electric Pale Ale, Russian Imperial Stout, Irish Red Ale

Working on: Altbier, Light Lager, Electric Pale Ale (Sessionable)


PostLink    Posted: Wed Mar 05, 2014 7:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Exactly in the steps outlined:

1. Rack to brite tank (secondary)
2. Crash chill to near freezing (if possible)
3. Once near freezing, add 1 tsp of unflavoured gelatine dissolved in a cup of hot distilled water per 5 gallons of beer
4. Let clear for 2-3 days

I don't normally do (2). I normally skip it and do it all room temp, but doing it near freezing will help it clear faster.
When I do do (2), I hold near freezing with the gelatine until clear. Usually 2-3 days is all that's needed. After that I keg.

Always purge any vessel with C02 before racking too, to avoid oxidation.

Kal

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BlueBridge



Joined: 05 Mar 2014
Posts: 4



PostLink    Posted: Wed Mar 05, 2014 11:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kal wrote:
Exactly in the steps outlined:

1. Rack to brite tank (secondary)
2. Crash chill to near freezing (if possible)
3. Once near freezing, add 1 tsp of unflavoured gelatine dissolved in a cup of hot distilled water per 5 gallons of beer
4. Let clear for 2-3 days

I don't normally do (2). I normally skip it and do it all room temp, but doing it near freezing will help it clear faster.
When I do do (2), I hold near freezing with the gelatine until clear. Usually 2-3 days is all that's needed. After that I keg.

Kal


Thanks! I was thinking maybe you just crash it down to near freezing, and then let it rise back up to room temp on it's own. Nevermind.
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inkedbrewer



Joined: 15 Jan 2015
Posts: 56



PostLink    Posted: Fri Feb 06, 2015 4:00 pm    Post subject: yum yum Reply with quote

I was lucky enough to get my hands on a six pack of this years HopSlam.

A customer came into the local homebrew shop I work at and let me know that the ABC Liquor down the street got some in.
After the customer left, I put up a sign "went to grab lunch be back in 15 min" and drove down to the store. I bought a six pack. There was only one case left.

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Veritas



Joined: 15 Jan 2012
Posts: 15



PostLink    Posted: Fri Mar 20, 2015 8:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey fellow brewers! I had the pleasure of brewing 12 gallons of Kal's Hopslam clone about a month ago, and I have to say that in all my years of brewing, it is the best batch, hands down, that I have ever brewed!

I followed the recipe (including adjusting the my water) and the final product was simply amazing: Wonderful piney, dank, citrus, grapefruit on the nose, amazingly full body with a true "hop slam" on the palate, and a surprisingly dry finish for such a big beer. Thanks for sharing your recipe, Kal... this one is a winner!

I took some pictures of my brew day and my system, including an awesome shot of my hop screen with a mountain of hop sludge on it post brewing! The system worked like a champ (although my efficiency was a bit lower, I'll have to dial it in a bit). You'll see that I'm using a pseudo-clone of Kal's system, but I am using a rims tube (mounted vertically on the left side of my stand) to control mash temp. If you stop by my page, just scroll down a bit and you'll see my post about my hopslam brew day. (Kal, I hope it's okay to post a link.)

https://www.facebook.com/PineGroveBrewWorks
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Viper



Joined: 22 Mar 2015
Posts: 4



PostLink    Posted: Mon Mar 23, 2015 12:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What domestic 2-row do you recommend? Pale Malt, Briess Pale Malt, Malteurop? I am new to this and would really like a close copy of this beer.
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 6165
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Mexican Lager, ESB, Mild, Citra Double IPA, Schwarzbier, Electric Pale Ale, Russian Imperial Stout, Irish Red Ale

Working on: Altbier, Light Lager, Electric Pale Ale (Sessionable)


PostLink    Posted: Mon Mar 23, 2015 12:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Viper wrote:
What domestic 2-row do you recommend? Pale Malt, Briess Pale Malt, Malteurop? I am new to this and would really like a close copy of this beer.

Any low colour (~2L) 2-row will work. Any subtle differences will be completely lost in the hops. Note that most malt is 2-row so don't get confused with the names and buy 'pale malt' as that's usually slightly darker. Get something that they're actually calling 2-row or domestic 2-row like.

Any of the ones linked to here: http://www.theelectricbrewery.com/Domestic-2-row-malt

Kal

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Last edited by kal on Mon Mar 23, 2015 12:15 am; edited 1 time in total
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Viper



Joined: 22 Mar 2015
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PostLink    Posted: Mon Mar 23, 2015 12:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the quick reply
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