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Maple Syrup Beer

 
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silverspoons



Joined: 21 Dec 2010
Posts: 480
Location: Webster NY


PostLink    Posted: Fri Apr 10, 2015 1:14 pm    Post subject: Maple Syrup Beer Reply with quote


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An article in my newspaper today about brewing with maple syrup, spring time syrup running now and all spring time stuff. I recently brewed an alaskan brich syrup beer. My daughter was on an "Alaskan Adventure " vacation and brought me back a jug of birch syrup. I added the syrup in the last 10 minutes of the boil. Bottled it last week, tasted superb at that time.

My question is this, in the article in the newspaper they show ( in a caption under a picture ) and describe the brewer adding the maple syrup to the "carbonation tank". Is this just a writer getting his or her facts wrong or is it possible the syrup would be added that late?

Silverspoon
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Tungsten



Joined: 06 Dec 2014
Posts: 187
Location: Buffalo, NY

Drinking: S-Curve Double IPA

Working on: Leila's Crown Stout


PostLink    Posted: Fri Apr 10, 2015 1:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've never used it, but I'm sure that Palmer mentioned using it as an option in How to Brew for natural carbonation. With any of those "other" sugar options (honey is the other one that sticks out in my mind), you just need to make sure you're adding the correct gravity of priming sugar for carbonation.

I obviously wouldn't do that if I was force carbonating, though.
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jengum



Joined: 07 Nov 2012
Posts: 20
Location: Portland, OR USA


PostLink    Posted: Fri Apr 10, 2015 8:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Could be interesting for a big Belgian type ale, in place of traditional sugar additions.
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Portland, OR
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Tripel



Joined: 25 Feb 2015
Posts: 10
Location: Pennsylvania

Drinking: Imperial Stout, Big American Strong Blonde Ale

Working on: Maple something?


PostLink    Posted: Sat Apr 11, 2015 12:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Timely post.

My Mom and Dad will arrive next week with a large jug of Michigan UP harvested Maple syrup. We're going to brew a beer together with a local Upper Peninsula focus. I'm thinking of using it as a late boil addition to an Irish Red or a doppelbock? Wish I had some birch sap to add to the mash.

What other styles would maple syrup enhance?

Thanks All!
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silverspoons



Joined: 21 Dec 2010
Posts: 480
Location: Webster NY


PostLink    Posted: Sat Apr 11, 2015 2:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This was the seasonal beer from Alaskan Brewing Co. that i used as a basis.. brew it as an ale with SAF-05 as the yeast.. stepped mashed as per recipe below.. actually used the birch syrup, not the maple listed in the ingredients and it was 1 lb by weight..

http://www.alaskanbeer.com/our-brew/limited-edition/pilot-series/alaskan-birch-bock.html


my recipe for 5.75gal batch at 85% brewery effeciency:

Silverspoons



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Tripel



Joined: 25 Feb 2015
Posts: 10
Location: Pennsylvania

Drinking: Imperial Stout, Big American Strong Blonde Ale

Working on: Maple something?


PostLink    Posted: Sun Apr 12, 2015 12:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Silverspoons,

Thanks much for the recipe! That's the direction I thought might be good with maple syrup. Very helpful. I'll post where we end up? :mug

let us know how your beer is coming along as it finishes.
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SubEMCM



Joined: 09 Jan 2015
Posts: 13
Location: VA Beach, VA


PostLink    Posted: Mon Apr 13, 2015 5:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
My question is this, in the article in the newspaper they show ( in a caption under a picture ) and describe the brewer adding the maple syrup to the "carbonation tank". Is this just a writer getting his or her facts wrong or is it possible the syrup would be added that late?


I have actually done this with maple syrup. Brewed a breakfast stout and used maple syrup as a priming sugar to go into the bottles. It turned out fantastic, and there was a definite maple taste!
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Tungsten



Joined: 06 Dec 2014
Posts: 187
Location: Buffalo, NY

Drinking: S-Curve Double IPA

Working on: Leila's Crown Stout


PostLink    Posted: Mon Apr 13, 2015 6:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SubEMCM wrote:
Quote:
My question is this, in the article in the newspaper they show ( in a caption under a picture ) and describe the brewer adding the maple syrup to the "carbonation tank". Is this just a writer getting his or her facts wrong or is it possible the syrup would be added that late?


I have actually done this with maple syrup. Brewed a breakfast stout and used maple syrup as a priming sugar to go into the bottles. It turned out fantastic, and there was a definite maple taste!


Nice! How did you mix the maple syrup with the beer? Did you dilute the correct amount of syrup with water and then boil & add to bottling bucket? That's my process for normal bottle carbonation with plain old corn sugar, but I'm not sure if the same process could be used with a much thicker maple syrup.
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silverspoons



Joined: 21 Dec 2010
Posts: 480
Location: Webster NY


PostLink    Posted: Mon Apr 13, 2015 8:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SubEMCM wrote:
Quote:
My question is this, in the article in the newspaper they show ( in a caption under a picture ) and describe the brewer adding the maple syrup to the "carbonation tank". Is this just a writer getting his or her facts wrong or is it possible the syrup would be added that late?


I have actually done this with maple syrup. Brewed a breakfast stout and used maple syrup as a priming sugar to go into the bottles. It turned out fantastic, and there was a definite maple taste!


Never used it as priming sugar and my question would be the same as Tungsten. I would mix with water and boil to sanitize, add to bottling bucket but i'm interested in how much would be used.. i generally use 124g of table sugar for a 5.5 gal batch. I added that maple syrup in mine at the end of the boil for about 10 minutes

Silverspoon
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SubEMCM



Joined: 09 Jan 2015
Posts: 13
Location: VA Beach, VA


PostLink    Posted: Tue Apr 14, 2015 10:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tungsten wrote:

Nice! How did you mix the maple syrup with the beer? Did you dilute the correct amount of syrup with water and then boil & add to bottling bucket? That's my process for normal bottle carbonation with plain old corn sugar, but I'm not sure if the same process could be used with a much thicker maple syrup.


I used the syrup at a rate of 1c for 5gal, diluted in 1c water and boiled for 5 minutes, then added to the bottling bucket. It came out awesome, somewhere in the 2.4vol range!
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silverspoons



Joined: 21 Dec 2010
Posts: 480
Location: Webster NY


PostLink    Posted: Tue Apr 14, 2015 12:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks

Silverspoons
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Tungsten



Joined: 06 Dec 2014
Posts: 187
Location: Buffalo, NY

Drinking: S-Curve Double IPA

Working on: Leila's Crown Stout


PostLink    Posted: Tue Apr 14, 2015 2:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you!
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Tripel



Joined: 25 Feb 2015
Posts: 10
Location: Pennsylvania

Drinking: Imperial Stout, Big American Strong Blonde Ale

Working on: Maple something?


PostLink    Posted: Tue Apr 14, 2015 2:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SubEMCM wrote:


I used the syrup at a rate of 1c for 5gal, diluted in 1c water and boiled for 5 minutes, then added to the bottling bucket. It came out awesome, somewhere in the 2.4vol range!


I like this idea. Simple solution plus natural carbonation (keg) and better maple flavor. Now I'm leaning towards this approach....
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jbrace1



Joined: 21 Feb 2014
Posts: 28
Location: Minnetonka

Drinking: Amarillo Dry-Hopped IPA, Blue Moon Clone, Saison, RIS, English Mild, Blackberry Cider

Working on: Kolsch, Oberon


PostLink    Posted: Tue Apr 14, 2015 3:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We make our own maple syrup every year and this year, since I'm also brewing as well, I plan to try a maple stout. Beersmith states that adding maple syrup to the boil just adds fermentables and dries out the beer but does not add maple flavor. Maple syrup added at the end of the boil adds maple flavor. I plan to give it a try at the end of the boil. I would think adding at bottling would also add nice maple flavor as well as priming. I keg only so I'll stick with the end of the boil and may try half way thru fermentation with the next batch.

I'm not that worried about infection. We boil the sap for hours and bottle it in boiled mason jars while it is still over 180F.
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Tripel



Joined: 25 Feb 2015
Posts: 10
Location: Pennsylvania

Drinking: Imperial Stout, Big American Strong Blonde Ale

Working on: Maple something?


PostLink    Posted: Tue Apr 14, 2015 3:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jbrace1,

Funny, splitting the additions between late boil and priming is what I was just thinking of doing as well. We will have a lot of maple syrup on hand and my Dad won't be around to see the syrup used when I prime the keg.

This should be fun and possibly delicious!
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jbrace1



Joined: 21 Feb 2014
Posts: 28
Location: Minnetonka

Drinking: Amarillo Dry-Hopped IPA, Blue Moon Clone, Saison, RIS, English Mild, Blackberry Cider

Working on: Kolsch, Oberon


PostLink    Posted: Tue Apr 14, 2015 3:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tripel,

+1 to dad not seeing Smile

Our one tree usually gives about a gallon and a pint of syrup every year but the early warm-up this year hurt us so we only got about a pint and a half. My in-laws however had an outstanding year with over 5 gallons of syrup this year. I offered to take some off their hands Smile
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SubEMCM



Joined: 09 Jan 2015
Posts: 13
Location: VA Beach, VA


PostLink    Posted: Tue Apr 14, 2015 4:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anyone tried to add some potassium sorbate to a dry beer and then backsweeten/flavor with syrup? Light bulb!
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silverspoons



Joined: 21 Dec 2010
Posts: 480
Location: Webster NY


PostLink    Posted: Tue Apr 14, 2015 4:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This all started with my gift of Birch Syrup from my daughter..

a little background of Birch vs. Maple Syrup

Birch syrup in Alaska is produced by collecting the sap from the paper birch and evaporating it to syrup. It takes an average of 100 gallons of sap to make 1 gallon of birch syrup. Maple syrup, by comparison, averages 40:1. The sap, containing only 1-1.5% sugar, looks and tastes much like water right out of the tree. Concentrating the sugar to 67% by evaporation gives the syrup its color and distinctive flavor.

The predominant, naturally occurring sugar in birch syrup is fructose, as opposed to maple which contains primarily sucrose. Fructose, due to its chemical structure, is more easily digested and assimilated by the human body. Fructose has the lowest glycemic index of all sugars and can therefore be the most suitable sugar for use, in small quantity, by diabetics. Birch syrup is high in vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C, potassium, manganese, thiamin, and calcium.

silverspoons
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Tripel



Joined: 25 Feb 2015
Posts: 10
Location: Pennsylvania

Drinking: Imperial Stout, Big American Strong Blonde Ale

Working on: Maple something?


PostLink    Posted: Tue Apr 14, 2015 5:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Silverspoons,

Say, you don't work for the Alaskan Birch Council do you?javascript:emoticon('Wink')

No seriously, thanks for starting the thread. Hope we haven't hijacked it by including Maple Syrup. I for one have learned a few things.
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