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Russian River Pliny The Younger Triple IPA
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
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Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Pale Ale (sessionable), Mild, NEIPA, Schwarzbier, Kölsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Saison


PostLink    Posted: Fri Oct 18, 2013 1:06 am    Post subject: Russian River Pliny The Younger Triple IPA Reply with quote


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Image (c) sacbee.com

Russian River Brewing Company's Pliny the Younger is a Triple IPA that has garnered a massive cult-like following over the years, partially due to the limited availability.

Pliny the Younger is not sold in bottles. It is only available for approximately two weeks every February directly from the kegs at the Russian River brew pub in Santa Rosa California, or in VERY limited distribution through local pubs in the region, some of which have had to resort to a lottery system or issuing tickets to keep things fair.


Image (c) surebeatswork.com

The ale, a successor to the popular double-hopped Pliny The Elder, made since 1998, was just a local story until 2009-2010 when word got out about Younger.

Several factors account for the growth: Russian River’s stellar reputation, beer drinkers’ affinity for extreme hops, and the demand for a rare, excellent beer in short supply. When Beer Advocate in 2009 christened Younger the best beer in the world (supplanting the legendary Belgian Westvleteren 12), the frenzy grew.

This only helped to push a hard to get beer into the status of nearly impossible to get, with some patrons driving across the country and lining up for hours to enjoy a single pint during the two week window.




Images (c) bayareaontap.com

Demand is so huge for this beer that they've even stopped filling growlers at the Russian River brew pub because in 2010 some patrons were buying four growlers each (the allowed limit) and then selling them in the parking lot, on Craigslist, or on eBay for $150 each (a six fold profit).

So who was 'Pliny The Younger' anyway? To quote the brewery's web page:

Quote:
Pliny the Younger, the man, was Pliny the Elder’s nephew and adopted son. They lived nearly 2,000 years ago! Pliny the Elder is our Double IPA, so we felt it was fitting to name our Triple IPA after his son. It is almost a true Triple IPA with triple the amount of hops as a regular I.P.A. That said, it is extremely difficult, time and space consuming, and very expensive to make. And that is why we don’t make it more often! This beer is very full-bodied with tons of hop character in the nose and throughout. It is also deceptively well-balanced and smooth.

For more information on the history of Pliny The Younger and what people will go through to get some, watch these videos:

PLINY: Documentary
Limited Release - Episode 5, Pliny the Younger

History and cult-like craziness aside, how does it actually taste? As the description states, it's a robust, hoppy beer, with piney, fruity and big floral aromas that masks the high 10 percent alcohol. In a way it's impossibly, clean, crisp and smooth for a beer that’s that high in alcohol. After taking a sip it feels like the beer is still sitting on your tongue, even a minute after your last sip (what wine connoisseurs call excellent 'length').

Younger is not overly bitter like some double (Imperial) IPAs. It's balanced, very floral, and complex. It has a smoother finish and less bite than Pliny The Elder which I've brewed a few times now. Because of this smoother finish, it doesn't taste like a 10%+ ABV beer so be warned - it can sneak up on you!

While Pliny the Younger packs a serious punch, it lacks the overwhelmingly sweet flavour that normally dominates Imperial or Double IPAs. This is one of the keys to brewing Younger correctly: It needs to finish very dry, in the 1.006 to 1.008 range. Not an easy thing to do given that the starting gravity is 1.088. That's 91-93% attenuation! You need to do whatever you can to make sure it finishes as dry as possible. This means a very long mash at low temperature (or even better, a step mash that starts very low and hits a few temperatures as described in our recipe below, similar to what is used for Bud Light to make the wort extremely fermentable), proper aeration, and proper fermentation with the right amount of clean yeast.

The hop oil level is so high that Russian River uses CO2-extracted hop extract for the bittering hops instead of traditional pellet or whole hops. The hop extract isn't isomerised, so it still contains all the oils and volatiles of normal hops (alpha-acids, beta-acids and essential oils). All the resins are extracted from the hop leaving behind the vegetal matter, which means that when hop extract is used, less precious wort is soaked up in the kettle and the possibly of giving the beer a grassy taste is minimized.


A 5ml syringe of CO2 extracted hop extract, equivalent to 1 oz of a 10% AA hop

For homebrew use hop extract is available as HopShots in disposable syringes. Generally speaking, 5ml of hop extract replaces 1 oz of a 10% AA hop, or another way to say it is that 1ml of hop extract adds 2AAU of bitterness. (More information)




Hop extract in syringes is used at 90 and 45 minutes, pellet hops for all other additions

Even with the bittering additions done with hop extract, there was still a staggering amount of hop sludge at the bottom of the kettle due to the nearly full pound of late hops added (for this 10 gallon batch).

Russian River mentions in their description that this beer is difficult and time consuming to make and they are entirely correct.

Cleaning was a chore due to the oily residue left behind in the boil kettle from the hop extract. It is incredibly sticky and hard to clean. Normally pellet or whole hops take 5-10 minutes to clean out of the boil kettle. This sticky/oily substance took over an hour, and I must have used two thirds of a bottle of Oxiclean spray.

Lesson learned for next time: I recommend using a putty knife or similar straight edge tool to first remove as much of the tar as you can, limiting the amount of Oxiclean spray and elbow grease required to break down the residual oily tar-like substance. Scrubbing, spraying, and swearing the whole time I was thinking to myself "No way am I going to brew this again".

Fast forward to today however, where I've been enjoying Pliny The Younger on tap for almost a month now and I've changed my tune somewhat. All I can think is "Wow - This is the Imperial IPA I need to keep on tap at all times". It is truly that good. I'm considering buying hop extract in bulk (hard to find) and my own 5ml Luer-Lok disposable syringes to make my own hop extract syringes. (More information)

The quadruple dry hopping also takes time and you have to be very careful not to oxidize the beer. To minimize contact with air, always purge the headspace with CO2 every time after you open up the vessel. Do the same whenever racking by purging the target vessel with CO2 first.

I first brewed this on August 25, 2013 (batch #162). Brew up a batch and let me know how you like it!

Credits for the original recipe go to Scott at Bertus Brewery who's fantastic articles on this beer (here and here) are a must-read. Check out some of his other recipes as well. He's one of the few brewers that goes into detail with his recipes explaining the why's and how's of what he does and the ingredients he chooses. Excellent work Scott!

Interested in seeing what we're brewing right now? Follow our Instagram feed for pictures and videos of our brewing activities as they happen.

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Russian River Pliny The Younger Triple IPA

Size: 12.0 US gal (post-boil)
Efficiency: 91.3% (lower due to the high gravity)
Attenuation: 91.0%
Calories: 287 kcal per 12.0 fl oz

Original Gravity: 1.088 (1.075 - 1.090)
Terminal Gravity: 1.008 (1.010 - 1.020)
Color: 6.5 (8.0 - 15.0)
Alcohol: 10.5% (7.5% - 10.0%)
Bitterness: Who knows (60.0 - 120.0)

Ingredients:
28 lb Domestic 2-Row Malt (84.9%)
1.3 lb Carapils®/Carafoam® (3.9%)
11 oz Crystal Malt 40L (2.1%)
14 HopShots (14 x 5ml hop extract) - added during boil, boiled 90 min (??? IBU)
2 HopShots (2 x 5ml hop extract) - added during boil, boiled 45 min (??? IBU)
0.7 oz Columbus Hops (14.0%) - added during boil, boiled 45 min [12.6 IBU]
3.0 oz Simcoe Hops (11.7%) - added during boil, boiled 30 min [37.85 IBU]
1 Whirlfloc Tablet (Irish moss) - added during boil, boiled 15 min
3.0 lb Corn sugar (dextrose) (9.1%) - added during boil*, boiled 10 min
5.0 oz Simcoe Hops (11.7%) - added during boil, boiled 0 min
3.0 oz Centennial Hops (10.9%) - added during boil, boiled 0 min
2.0 oz Amarillo Hops (9.4%) - added during boil, boiled 0 min
1.0 oz Chinook Hops (10.0%) - added during boil, boiled 0 min
48 g Fermentis Safale US-05 dry yeast
1.0 oz Simcoe Hops (11.7%) - dry hop #1
1.0 oz Amarillo Hops (9.4%) - dry hop #1
1.0 oz Warrior Hops (15.4%) - dry hop #1
2.0 oz Columbus Hops (14.0%) - dry hop #2
2.0 oz Centennial Hops (10.9%) - dry hop #2
1.0 oz Simcoe Hops (11.7%) - dry hop #3
1.0 oz Chinook Hops (10.0%) - dry hop #3
0.5 oz Warrior Hops (15.4%) - dry hop #3
2.0 oz Simcoe Hops (11.7%) - dry hop #4
1.0 oz Amarillo Hops (9.4%) - dry hop #4
1.0 oz Columbus Hops (14.0%) - dry hop #4

* For recipes that call for simple sugars like corn sugar, adding them near the end of fermentation instead of in the boil can help if you have attenuation problems (ie: problems finishing in the 1.006-1.008 range). To do this, heat up some distilled water to near boiling (above 180F) and stir in about 1lb of corn sugar. Let it cool and add directly to the fermenter. Keep doing this every 2-3 days until all of the corn sugar is used up. Why does this help with attenuation? Yeast likes to eat simple sugars (like corn sugar) first before it attacks the more complex ones produced by the grain. By giving the yeast only the 'less tasty' stuff (complex sugars) first they're more likely to finish it all before moving on the 'tasty stuff' (simple sugars). Giving them both at the same time is like giving your kids dinner and desert at the same time. They'll eat desert first and then be too full to eat their dinner. Given them dinner first, and there's always room for desert. Wink

Notes:
Add 500mg potassium metabisulphite to 20 gallons water to remove chlorine/chloramine (as required).
Water treated with brewing salts to: Ca=110, Mg=17, Na=15, Cl=50, S04=280
(Basically Randy Mosher's ideal Pale Ale numbers with slightly less Sulphate).
For complete details on how to adjust your water, refer to our step by step Water Adjustments guide.
1.5 qt/lb mash thickness.
Mash at 145F for 90 mins, then raise to 155F and hold for an additional 30 mins.
Raise to 168F mashout and hold for 10 mins.
60-90 min fly sparge with ~6 pH water. Collect 14.6 gallons in the boil kettle.
Boil for 90 minutes. Lid on at flameout, start chilling immediately.
Cool wort to 66F and aerate extremely well. Pure oxygen from a tank can help at a rate of 1 litre per minute for 120 seconds. Aerate again ~12 hours after pitching.
Ferment at 66F for 7 days.
Raise to 68-70F, add dry hop #1 and hold 7 days, then rack to brite tank (secondary).
Add dry hop #2 and hold 4 days. Gently swirl 2-3 times/day. Remove after 4 days.
Add dry hop #3 and hold 4 days. Gently swirl 2-3 times/day. Remove after 4 days.
Add dry hop #4 and hold 4 days. Gently swirl 2-3 times/day. Remove after 4 days.
Crash chill to near freezing (if possible), add 1 tsp of unflavoured gelatin dissolved in a cup of hot distilled water per 5 gallons of beer, and let clear for 2-3 days.
Package as you would normally. I keg and carbonate on the low side (around 2 to 2.2 volumes of C02) to minimize carbonic bite and let the hop/malt flavour come through.

When multiple dry hopping is called for such as in this recipe, I use a stainless steel dry hopper for kegs with a removable top that makes it easy to add new hops. Tie a piece of unflavoured/unwaxed dental floss to the dry hopper lid to make it easy to remove. The floss is thin enough that it doesn't impede the seal between the keg and keg lid.

Once fermentation has completed, in order to prevent oxidation and maximize the hop flavours and aromas, it's very important to minimize oxygen contact with the beer. This means that when racking to a new vessel, always purge the vessel first with CO2. As well, whenever opening a fermenter or keg lid to add dry hops, always make sure to fill the head space with a squirt of CO2. You're going to be opening/closing the fermenter(s) and keg(s) multiple times so minimizing oxidation is critical.

If you prefer to use liquid yeast, either of these is an excellent choice as they are the same clean fermenting Chico strain as US-05:

Wyeast 1056 American Ale
White Labs WLP-001 California Ale

You'll need to use 6 packs/vials or make an appropriate starter. For more information see Chapter 6 of How to Brew and Appendix A of Brewing Classic Styles.

For complete brewing instructions, see our Brew Day: Step by Step guide.

Brew yourself a batch today and let us know how you like it! Enjoy!

Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!

SEE OUR OTHER RECIPES »


Vinnie Cilurzo, brewer and owner of Russian River Brewing Company


The Russian River Brewery Company's pub. Image (c) sfgate.com


List of beers on tap at The Russian River Brewery Company's pub. Image (c) sfgate.com


Pouring Pliny the Younger. Image (c) westword.com


A tray full of hard to get Pliny the Younger. Image (c) westword.com

Kal

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Fejj



Joined: 10 Jun 2013
Posts: 213
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PostLink    Posted: Fri Oct 18, 2013 1:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow! Time to talk to the boss(work at the LHBS atm) to see if he can get home extract from his wholesalers. Also, wouldng recircing hot PBW threw your BK help quite a bit with the residue you describe?
2cents
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
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Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Pale Ale (sessionable), Mild, NEIPA, Schwarzbier, Kölsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Saison


PostLink    Posted: Fri Oct 18, 2013 1:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fejj wrote:
Also, wouldng recircing hot PBW threw your BK help quite a bit with the residue you describe?
2cents

Not sure. The residue was all the way up the kettle (wherever wort or foam touched) so in my case I would have needed to fill the boil 20 gallon kettle almost all the way to the top with water and probably used a TON of cleaner since it would have been very diluted. I was spraying it on concentrated.

Kal

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kchomebrew



Joined: 18 Aug 2013
Posts: 5



PostLink    Posted: Fri Oct 18, 2013 11:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kal wrote:
Fejj wrote:
Also, wouldng recircing hot PBW threw your BK help quite a bit with the residue you describe?
2cents

Not sure. The residue was all the way up the kettle (wherever wort or foam touched) so in my case I would have needed to fill the boil 20 gallon kettle almost all the way to the with water and probably used a TON of cleaner since it would have been very diluted. I was spraying it on concentrated.

Kal



What about the heating elements ? Did those get any of the residue stuck to them ? This sounds like a total pain in the ass....but now I have to try making it.
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 7684
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Pale Ale (sessionable), Mild, NEIPA, Schwarzbier, Kölsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Saison


PostLink    Posted: Fri Oct 18, 2013 1:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kchomebrew wrote:
What about the heating elements ? Did those get any of the residue stuck to them ?

Slightly less if I remember correctly, but pretty much everything in the boil kettle had a thin layer of tar on it.

Quote:
This sounds like a total pain in the ass....but now I have to try making it.

Wink It's worth it (IMHO!).

Kal

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dunnry



Joined: 10 Oct 2012
Posts: 42
Location: Strongsville, OH


PostLink    Posted: Mon Nov 04, 2013 4:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Following your lead, I decided to tackle this brew last weekend. I bought my hopshots in bulk from Yakima Hops along with some 5ml Luer lock syringes and the caps. Total bill on 200g (2 cans) of hops extract + syringes was $77. From that I was able to package 58 hopshots - which works out to $1.32 ea. I do have 40-odd caps and syringes left over from that buy, but as you can see it was not a huge difference from just buying the $1.99 shots from NB.

The sheer amount of actual hops in the boil is huge. The first and early question I had in my mind was, "Do I really need to use the hopshots?". I know that hop resin is a PITA to work with, so perhaps just subbing a high alpha hop would work fine. Well, assuming that each hopshot is about equal to 1oz of 10%AA hops, it means that you would need to add another full pound of hops to get the same bittering as the hop extract. The wort losses to absorption would be pretty bad at that point (they are high as it is). I think hop resin is the only way you can really do this brew.

Here is my layout of the hops needed just for the boil.




And here is the hellish nightmare you get to clean afterwards. I ended up using a plastic scraper to remove a large amount of the gunk at first and then had to fill the kettle mostly full and recirculate PBW to get it actually cleaned. It was nasty stuff to work with and get on your hands.



Things are happily bubbling away right now, however. Hoping this will be worth the expense and effort!
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OkieDokie



Joined: 31 Aug 2013
Posts: 185
Location: Oklahoma

Drinking: Electric ale, Weizen

Working on: Electric lager, American Amber Ale, Dirty Blonde


PostLink    Posted: Mon Nov 04, 2013 5:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You know, everyone is going to have to try to make this I just emailed the link to my brother-in-law to get his "help". I know which part he is going to help with Smile . He wants me to make a 90 min IPA from Dogfish Head, so we might tackle this one also. Looks like a great beer!
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OkieDokie



Joined: 31 Aug 2013
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Location: Oklahoma

Drinking: Electric ale, Weizen

Working on: Electric lager, American Amber Ale, Dirty Blonde


PostLink    Posted: Mon Nov 04, 2013 5:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just reading through the recipe sounds like it takes some time to condition once it is made. Has anyone gotten a feel for the amount of conditioning time once kegged?
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
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Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Pale Ale (sessionable), Mild, NEIPA, Schwarzbier, Kölsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Saison


PostLink    Posted: Tue Nov 05, 2013 2:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

dunnry wrote:
The first and early question I had in my mind was, "Do I really need to use the hopshots?".

I had the same feeling when I brewed it... it seemed completely over the top.

Quote:
I know that hop resin is a PITA to work with, so perhaps just subbing a high alpha hop would work fine. Well, assuming that each hopshot is about equal to 1oz of 10%AA hops, it means that you would need to add another full pound of hops to get the same bittering as the hop extract. The wort losses to absorption would be pretty bad at that point (they are high as it is). I think hop resin is the only way you can really do this brew.

I think it's more than just the amount of hop sludge that soaks up precious wort - from what I've read, one of the reasons for the smoothness of Younger is that the extract is smoother tasting. I know it doesn't make much sense if it's true and pure hop extract but I could have sworn I read it somewhere.

Quote:
And here is the hellish nightmare you get to clean afterwards.

Thanks for posting a picture of this. I completely forgot myself. You can see the 'shiny' bits and coating on the element and walls - that's the sticky tar-like sludge. Fun times! Time to go to the basement now and have a pint and remember how much work it was to clean. Wink

OkieDokie wrote:
Just reading through the recipe sounds like it takes some time to condition once it is made. Has anyone gotten a feel for the amount of conditioning time once kegged?


Very little. These sorts of hop forward beers are best drunk fresh. After I kegged mine it was ~2 weeks on C02 at near freezing and then put on tap.

Kal

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Fejj



Joined: 10 Jun 2013
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PostLink    Posted: Tue Nov 05, 2013 3:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Man i really want to brew this.
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Castermmt



Joined: 03 Jan 2011
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PostLink    Posted: Fri Dec 27, 2013 11:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm all set to brew this beast in the morning. Got everything weighed out and ready to go. I can't wait to taste, drink and share it. Sounds and looks so good.
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kal
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Joined: 12 Dec 2010
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Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Pale Ale (sessionable), Mild, NEIPA, Schwarzbier, Kölsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Saison


PostLink    Posted: Fri Dec 27, 2013 11:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good luck! I just finished the first keg of two a few days ago myself and while the hope aroma's faded a bit, I still really enjoyed it.

Had a couple of brandy snifter's of it last night while watching Sam Calagione's documentary series on Discovery called "Brew Masters".... In last night's episode they had to dump $500K worth of 120minute.... the horror....

Kal

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Castermmt



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Drinking: Steelhead Porter, Alt-Toids, Hefty-Weizen, Terry's Kolsch, African Amber, Pumpkin Ale, Double Dog Ale

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PostLink    Posted: Sat Dec 28, 2013 11:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, I brewed it. It wasn't that bad to clean up, I did skim some of the gunk of the boil that looked like slime and tiny little grease balls. I learned from reading your post that it would be easier using some PBW which I did and it came right off. Not any more difficult to brew then any other beer. can't wait to drink it. Thanks for the share, Castermmt
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kal
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Drinking: German Lager, Electric Pale Ale (sessionable), Mild, NEIPA, Schwarzbier, Kölsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

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PostLink    Posted: Sat Dec 28, 2013 11:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don't skim the grease balls! That's hop oil.

Kal

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dunnry



Joined: 10 Oct 2012
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PostLink    Posted: Fri Jan 03, 2014 4:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Castermmt wrote:
Well, I brewed it. It wasn't that bad to clean up, I did skim some of the gunk of the boil that looked like slime and tiny little grease balls. I learned from reading your post that it would be easier using some PBW which I did and it came right off. Not any more difficult to brew then any other beer. can't wait to drink it. Thanks for the share, Castermmt


Interesting. After I brewed this I found that the leftover hop resin had the same quality as tree pitch. There was a tremendous amount of it (you can see it everywhere in my pic). It stained my hands and sponge(s) and made everything very tacky. Only after filling the kettle mostly full and circulating warm PBW was I able to get most of it off. Even then, I found a bunch stuck in the Hop Stopper on the bottom I must have missed the next time I brewed (it clogged up the stopper). A 2 day soak in PBW for the stopper seems to have removed that now.

While I wouldn't say that it was impossible to clean, it certainly was 4x more effort than any other beer I have made. Incidentally, I will be kegging mine shortly (today or so). In a couple weeks I will find out if it was worth it.

Just a note on mine: I was unhappy with my final gravity - somewhere around 1.011-3. That was with 4 re-hydrated US-05 packages and pure O2. Next time, I think I will make sure to hit it with pure O2 again after 24 hrs to really get the yeast moving. It is pretty tough to get to 1.008 with this one without a tremendous pitch and lots of O2.
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kal
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Drinking: German Lager, Electric Pale Ale (sessionable), Mild, NEIPA, Schwarzbier, Kölsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

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PostLink    Posted: Fri Jan 03, 2014 5:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dunnry wrote:
Just a note on mine: I was unhappy with my final gravity - somewhere around 1.011-3. That was with 4 re-hydrated US-05 packages and pure O2. Next time, I think I will make sure to hit it with pure O2 again after 24 hrs to really get the yeast moving. It is pretty tough to get to 1.008 with this one without a tremendous pitch and lots of O2.


I hit 1.008. 1.006 would have been even better however.

I didn't use pure O2 but used the Fizz-X for about 2 minutes at high speed, and then again about 12 hours after pitching. To do this I had to rack into two other pails as I knew it would foam up a lot (so about 3 gallons per pail when I fizz-X'ed on the second day).

Make sure your hydrometer's calibrated too, and that you're compensating for temp. You may be lower than you think.

Kal

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Fejj



Joined: 10 Jun 2013
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PostLink    Posted: Fri Jan 03, 2014 8:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

IF you didnt hit your target FG it could be more then just a yeast issue, US-05 has a great attenuation rate so it could of been a mash temp issue. Check to see if you are actually hitting your temps throughout your mash.

Just a thought,
Jeff
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dunnry



Joined: 10 Oct 2012
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PostLink    Posted: Fri Jan 03, 2014 9:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fejj wrote:
IF you didnt hit your target FG it could be more then just a yeast issue, US-05 has a great attenuation rate so it could of been a mash temp issue. Check to see if you are actually hitting your temps throughout your mash.


True - however, I have mashed at that temperature before and not had any issues. My system is identical to Kal's and I have calibrated with a thermapen. My best guess is that since it was one of the first times using pure O2, I likely didn't do it correctly (not long enough). Subsequent high gravity brews have all attenuated well with the two-step oxygen addition (with pitch, +24hrs). I started using pure O2 after the drill + paddled whip wasn't cutting it for a couple 1.100+ brews. Perhaps I should combine the two next time. Smile
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Fejj



Joined: 10 Jun 2013
Posts: 213
Location: North Shore, MA


PostLink    Posted: Fri Jan 03, 2014 9:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As an afterthought, how old where they packages of US-05? Also, I'm wondering if Kal rehydrates or pitches the dry yeast straight into the beer. I've read(quite a while ago) that re-hydrating dry yeast can cause certain issues due to the way the yeast is put into hibernation for the drying process. I could be wrong tbqh i cant remember the exact details.

Edit: I also found this
http://www.brewwithfermentis.com/2011/05/12/rehydrating-dry-yeast-water-or-wort/

Edit2: All kinds of good info on that page. Safale Recommends to not oxygenate after 12 hours.
http://www.brewwithfermentis.com/tips-tricks/oxygen-effects/
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dunnry



Joined: 10 Oct 2012
Posts: 42
Location: Strongsville, OH


PostLink    Posted: Fri Jan 03, 2014 10:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fejj wrote:
As an afterthought, how old where they packages of US-05? Also, I'm wondering if Kal rehydrates or pitches the dry yeast straight into the beer. I've read(quite a while ago) that re-hydrating dry yeast can cause certain issues due to the way the yeast is put into hibernation for the drying process. I could be wrong tbqh i cant remember the exact details.

Edit: I also found this
http://www.brewwithfermentis.com/2011/05/12/rehydrating-dry-yeast-water-or-wort/

Edit2: All kinds of good info on that page. Safale Recommends to not oxygenate after 12 hours.
http://www.brewwithfermentis.com/tips-tricks/oxygen-effects/


Not sure how old they were - bought them a month or two earlier and stored in fridge. This was the first time rehydrating dry yeast for me, and I specifically did it because of the book "Yeast" and the advice that up to 50% of the yeast could die without rehydration. I think I rehydrated the yeast correctly, but who knows. It is yet another factor to consider.
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