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The Electric Pale Ale
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wscottcross



Joined: 03 Jul 2015
Posts: 201
Location: CT

Drinking: Launch IPA, Double Sunshine clone, Maple Coffee breakfast stout

Working on: expanding my beer horizons (and my beltline)


PostLink    Posted: Mon Feb 29, 2016 11:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote


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I "roused" the hops when I dry hopped my last batch and it was the best beer I've ever made. The dry hop was only 3 days and a total of 3 oz and it was amazing! I'm definitely doing that for my hop forward beers from now on.

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PoetryJoe



Joined: 26 Jun 2015
Posts: 5



PostLink    Posted: Mon Apr 18, 2016 10:01 pm    Post subject: 1st ever - just sampled my first pint... Reply with quote

What an awesome beer. This was my first ever all-grain recipe on my 50A, 20 gallon set up. The finished product is clear, crisp, and full of flavor. I'm hooked.

Joe
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Besk one



Joined: 01 Oct 2014
Posts: 26



PostLink    Posted: Tue Apr 19, 2016 10:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm making a 5 gallon batch this weekend but I'm splitting the dry hop 1.5oz Citra and 1.5oz Nelson Sauvin.

I think the Nelson will really put the aroma over the top! I have a bunch I need to use up in the freezer so thought I'd give it a try.
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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 8419
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: American Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Janet's Brown, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter, Saison, Kölsch

Working on: Kölsch, Janet's Brown Ale


PostLink    Posted: Wed Apr 20, 2016 12:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nelson Sauvin is a great hop (click the link for a description) - I think you'll like it! I think next time I make this beer (it doesn't seem to stick around too long) I'm going to try some myself as the dry hop.

Kal

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Besk one



Joined: 01 Oct 2014
Posts: 26



PostLink    Posted: Wed Apr 20, 2016 7:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just brewed a Galaxy/Citra/Nelson IPA that was the best beer I've personally ever brewed. Got some of the Nelson left over and figured this would be a great way to use it up. Love the aroma on it!
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SD Endorf



Joined: 24 Apr 2015
Posts: 76



PostLink    Posted: Thu Apr 21, 2016 9:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

OK.... I'll bite....
What do ya'll mean exactly by "rousing the hops"?
For dry hopping I've always just dumped and sealed 'er up.
I certainly don't want to oxygenate.

Got this brew on the to-do list.. !
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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 8419
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: American Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Janet's Brown, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter, Saison, Kölsch

Working on: Kölsch, Janet's Brown Ale


PostLink    Posted: Thu Apr 21, 2016 9:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SD Endorf wrote:
OK.... I'll bite....
What do ya'll mean exactly by "rousing the hops"?
For dry hopping I've always just dumped and sealed 'er up.
I certainly don't want to oxygenate.

Some people will gently stir or use other methods to rouse the hops from the bottom. I don't myself. Oxygenation is definitely a concern.

Kal

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wscottcross



Joined: 03 Jul 2015
Posts: 201
Location: CT

Drinking: Launch IPA, Double Sunshine clone, Maple Coffee breakfast stout

Working on: expanding my beer horizons (and my beltline)


PostLink    Posted: Thu Apr 21, 2016 9:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just tilt the carboy about 15-20 degrees and roll it in a small circle 10 or 12 times. This gets everything swirling quite nicely. I would never pull the airlock for this as I'm also paranoid about oxygenation. You could also use some sort of turntable or anything that would allow you to spin the carboy/bucket to get everything moving.

I only dry hop for 3-5 days and this method gets me some awesome hop punch with only 3 oz of dry hops.
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SD Endorf



Joined: 24 Apr 2015
Posts: 76



PostLink    Posted: Thu Apr 21, 2016 10:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

wscottcross wrote:
I just tilt the carboy about 15-20 degrees and roll it in a small circle 10 or 12 times. This gets everything swirling quite nicely. I would never pull the airlock for this as I'm also paranoid about oxygenation. You could also use some sort of turntable or anything that would allow you to spin the carboy/bucket to get everything moving.

I only dry hop for 3-5 days and this method gets me some awesome hop punch with only 3 oz of dry hops.


Sounds like a great idea. I'll try this on the next batch.
I think I'll wait a day after hopping to gas off the carboy, then give it a gentle swirl.
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confrarte



Joined: 28 Apr 2016
Posts: 1
Location: Brazil


PostLink    Posted: Thu Apr 28, 2016 1:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Besk one wrote:
I just brewed a Galaxy/Citra/Nelson IPA that was the best beer I've personally ever brewed. Got some of the Nelson left over and figured this would be a great way to use it up. Love the aroma on it!


Just tried Galaxy replacing Amarillo on the 0min addition - run out of amarillo in the last addition.
I'll see how it goes in a couple of weeks Smile

Cheers,
Christian
instagram.com/confrarte
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chastuck



Joined: 06 Oct 2013
Posts: 172
Location: Beckenham, Kent, UK

Drinking: Bitter

Working on: IPA


PostLink    Posted: Thu Apr 28, 2016 9:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anyone ever tried this recipe with Mosaic hops? I have just brewed a double IPA using only Mosaic and found the taste really excellent.
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jphussey



Joined: 17 Oct 2012
Posts: 163



PostLink    Posted: Mon Jan 02, 2017 11:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anyone ever use a different strain of yeast for this? Going to do a 10G batch and thinking about doing US-05/WLP001 for one fermenter and another more exotic or flavorful yeast. I remember Austin Homebrew had this Greenbelt Yeast that really had some great citrusy flavors.
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SD Endorf



Joined: 24 Apr 2015
Posts: 76



PostLink    Posted: Tue Jan 03, 2017 12:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

On my list, is to experiment with Omega DIPA and WLP095 Burlington for hoppy beers.
If you do try one of these, please report back your results.
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Bret



Joined: 24 Jan 2017
Posts: 1



PostLink    Posted: Tue Jan 24, 2017 10:09 pm    Post subject: Re: The Electric Pale Ale (batch #130) Reply with quote

kal wrote:
Boil for 60 minutes. Lid on at flameout with 0 minute hops, start chilling immediately.
Cool wort to 66F and aerate well. Ferment at 66-68F until complete.


I've had this on my brewing list for more than a year and I'm finally brewing it Friday... I realize you use a CFC, and you typically chill from boil kettle to fermenter, but since the hops are added at 0 min boil and immediately chilled, I was worried about how much flavor/aroma you manage to extract with that short of a contact time as my setup only takes about 5 minutes to chill 10 gallon batches. Am I reading that correctly? Thanks!

Bret
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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 8419
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: American Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Janet's Brown, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter, Saison, Kölsch

Working on: Kölsch, Janet's Brown Ale


PostLink    Posted: Tue Jan 24, 2017 10:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Bret!

Yes - that is correct. It's a quick steep with a reasonably large amount of hops. I don't want to isomerise to much of those hop oils. You'll be dry hopping later too.

You may certainly steep longer if you like, and even at different temperatures too, to see how you like the results. That's the beauty of brewing: There are endless possibilities and lots of "right" ways to brew.

Good luck with the brew and welcome to the forum!

Kal

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Trigger



Joined: 10 Feb 2017
Posts: 2
Location: Fort McMurray, AB.


PostLink    Posted: Fri Feb 10, 2017 8:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey I'm planning on brewing this recipe in the next couple weeks. This will be my first time attempting to build a water profile so I had a few questions just to ensure I get it right because from this point on out Id like to concentrate more on water. I got my profile from our local municipality and it is as follows.

Calcium =46.4 mg/L
Magnesium= 13.9 mg/L
Bicarbonate=199 mg/L
Sulphate = 48.8 mg/L
Sodium = 29.6 mg/L
Chloride = 28.1 mg/L
pH = 7.97
Hardness (CaCO3) =183 mg/L
Alkalinity= 163 mg/L

I played with brewers friend calculator and the closest I could get to the numbers on this recipe was Ca=112, Mg=23, Na=33, Cl=42, SO4=231 using 15g Gypsum, 1g Calcium Chloride, 5g Epsom Salts, .5g Canning Salts in 15 gal of water. Does this sound acceptable?

The other thing I was wondering was about the HCO3 column on the calculator, I dont see anything in the recipe to input a number there? As I understand that is the total hardness of the water? My water is better suited for dark beers @ 183. The only way to adjust that would be to dilute with distilled water and readjust my numbers using my brewing salts? Being that its a pale beer should I shoot for something around the 0-100 range? As always thanks for all your help!


Last edited by Trigger on Fri Feb 10, 2017 10:07 pm; edited 1 time in total
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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 8419
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: American Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Janet's Brown, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter, Saison, Kölsch

Working on: Kölsch, Janet's Brown Ale


PostLink    Posted: Fri Feb 10, 2017 9:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Trigger wrote:
I played with brewers friend calculator and the closest I could get to the numbers on this recipe was Ca=112, Mg=23, Na=33, Cl=42, SO4=231 using 15g Gypsum, 1g Calcium Chloride, 5g Epsom Salts, .5g Canning Salts in 15 gal of water. Does this sound acceptable?

Yup! Looks good to me. Though I'd probably skipping the NaCl (canning salt). I plugged your numbers into EZWater and was able to get:

Ca=125, Mg=23, Na=30, Cl=50, SO4=250
Using only Gypsum, CaCl, and Epsom.
Which is pretty darned close. You could always cut with distilled or RO water first if you wanted to get closer but I doubt you'd notice a difference. (don't worry about Ca being a bit higher)


Quote:
The other thing I was wondering was about the HCO3 column on the calculator, I dont see anything in the recipe to input a number there? As I understand that is the total hardness of the water? My water is better suited for dark beers @ 199. The only way to adjust that would be to dilute with distilled water and readjust my numbers using my brewing salts? Being that its a pale beer should I shoot for something around the 0-100 range? As always thanks for all your help!

Residual Alkalinity and Alkalinity are not targets. Don't try to adjust for them. Lots of the experts have been saying this and it's a subject that a lot of people seem to get wrong.

To quote Martin Brungard, author of Bru'n Water:

Quote:
The other thing to recognize is that there should NEVER be a target alkalinity for a water profile. This is because that target changes with every grist. Every grist has a different acid production and the target alkalinity is that alkalinity that produces a desirable mash pH. To emphasis that point, the Finished bicarbonate concentration cell in Bru'n Water will never turn green and give the brewer the impression that the number in the water profile is the RIGHT concentration. The brewer has to use the Mash pH prediction to guide themself to the right bicarbonate concentration for that brew.

Source: https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=10390.0

Your mash pH / flavor ions are what matters, not your alkalinity (unless the alkalinity is too high to achieve a good mash pH, and if it's too high you likely would have very high mineral content so you wouldn't be able to hit the targets you want). So for now just ignore alkalinity and residual alkalinity. It's one thing that Palmer's How to Brew gets wrong. I'm not sure if the newly revised/updated version due in June 2017 will fix it, but I'm hoping to have my "Water adjustment 101" article out before then and it'll make it all simple (I hope). Wink No guarantees on when it'll be out but I've been putting a lot of time into it over the last few weeks. Water adjustment has been made a really confusing subject that doesn't need to be.

Good luck and welcome to the forum!

Kal

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Trigger



Joined: 10 Feb 2017
Posts: 2
Location: Fort McMurray, AB.


PostLink    Posted: Fri Feb 10, 2017 10:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Awesome thanks so much for the quick reply! That clears things up alot, funny cause I was getting my target HCO3 numbers from palmers book. I will look forward to your article to clear things up further for me. I agree they make water profiles way more complicated then it has to be. I was always very overwhelmed whenever I looked into that subject and it was just one extra thing I couldnt deal with on brew day. I now feel I have my other variables in control (thanks to my amazing electricl brew panel) and its time I tried to get a grasp on the water situation! Thanks!
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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 8419
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: American Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Janet's Brown, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter, Saison, Kölsch

Working on: Kölsch, Janet's Brown Ale


PostLink    Posted: Fri Feb 10, 2017 10:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Definitely try and keep it simple.

While this is somewhat oversimplified, it is useful to think of brewing salts and acids by their roles:

Brewing salts: Used to adjust flavour.
Acids: Used to lower pH.

Use salts to hit the flavour profile you want. I add salts to the mash and boil using EZWaterCalculator to tell me how much in each.
Then use some acid (if required) in the mash if your pH isn't low enough.

Other than that, use some potassium metabisuplhite to initially get rid of chlorine/chloramine in your brewing water, and some acid in your sparge water to get the pH down to 5.6-5.8.

That's really all there is.

(why's it taking me so long to write the article??) Wink

Kal

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jphussey



Joined: 17 Oct 2012
Posts: 163



PostLink    Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2017 1:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Did this one today; still dialing in my efficiencies for recipe planning purposes, so just went with the as prescribed recipe here. Came in at 1.050 OG with 12 gallons post-boil (11 into fermenters, or there about).

My pre-boil gravity seemed really low at 1.0315 (two separate readings adjusted for temp were 1.031 and 1.032)...which if Beersmith isn't lying, is only like a 61.3% mash efficiency. Does that seem right?

I split the batch into two carboys and did one with US-05 and the other with WLP-008 (http://www.whitelabs.com/yeast-bank/wlp008-east-coast-ale-yeast).
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