Return to TheElectricBrewery.com
  [ Shop ]   [ Building ]   [ Using ]   [ Recipes ]   [ Testimonials ]   [ Gallery ]   [ FAQ ]   [ About Us ]   [ Contact Us ]   [ Newsletter ]

Log inLog in   RegisterRegister   User Control PanelUser Control Panel   Private MessagesPrivate Messages   MembershipClub Memberships   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   Photo AlbumsPhoto Albums   Forum FAQForum FAQ

Electric Creamsicle (New England Pale Ale)
Goto page Previous  1, 2
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic   Printer-friendly view    TheElectricBrewery.com Forum Index -> Recipes & Ingredients
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
OkieDokie




Joined: 31 Aug 2013
Posts: 191
Location: Oklahoma

Drinking: Electric ale, Weizen

Working on: Electric lager, American Amber Ale, Dirty Blonde


PostLink    Posted: Tue May 26, 2020 2:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote


        Register to remove this ad. It's free!
Kal, in this recipe write up, I noticed something on what I believe is your Boil Kettle (the one closest to your sink). On the spigot, it looks like you have 2 "extra" valves or connections, where you would attach the hoses. What are they for exactly? My set-up is your original plan and it's been working so well, I haven't bothered to need to change anything in the last 5 years! Just curious.
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator



Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10845
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Pub Ale, Electric Creamsicle, London Pride, Wit, Janet's Brown, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Quad, Belgian IPA


PostLink    Posted: Tue May 26, 2020 3:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

On the boil kettle output after the valve? I have a small 1.5" TC sight glass that I installed a few years ago that lets me see the colour of the wort coming out of the kettle. Is it useful? Not really. Wink It's more cleaning / assembly / disassembly and frankly doesn't add much value. Once you add a couple of TC clamps, gaskets, and an NPT to TC adapter you're at about $100.

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
We ship worldwide and support our products and customers for life.
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
OkieDokie




Joined: 31 Aug 2013
Posts: 191
Location: Oklahoma

Drinking: Electric ale, Weizen

Working on: Electric lager, American Amber Ale, Dirty Blonde


PostLink    Posted: Tue May 26, 2020 3:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's what it looked like, but I wasn't sure if I'd missed a crucial updated step in the building plans! Everything has been dialed in so well from the first moment that I've never had to adjust anything! 5 years going strong! Great job!
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator



Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10845
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Pub Ale, Electric Creamsicle, London Pride, Wit, Janet's Brown, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Quad, Belgian IPA


PostLink    Posted: Tue May 26, 2020 3:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Glad to hear your setup's working well!

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
We ship worldwide and support our products and customers for life.
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
jcav




Joined: 21 Sep 2011
Posts: 193
Location: Central Florida


PostLink    Posted: Tue May 26, 2020 10:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey Kal, I tapped the beer over the weekend (I quick carbed at 40 psi and then turned down to serving pressure) as I was impatient. I know it's a little young but man oh man, you did it again! Very nice beer this one is. I can't get over the flavor that this one hop imparts in this recipe. I am having one right now and it's even better! Very nice citrus, hint of creaminess, and so very drinkable. That's the thing I like most about your quality recipes and in the beers I try and come up with is the drinkability! Yes sir another Dandy! Thanks again for posting!

John

_________________
"Perfection is unobtainable, but if you chase perfection you can catch excellence"- Vince Lombardi
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator



Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10845
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Pub Ale, Electric Creamsicle, London Pride, Wit, Janet's Brown, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Quad, Belgian IPA


PostLink    Posted: Tue May 26, 2020 10:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Glad to hear you're enjoying it John! I need to get a starter going as my last keg just popped 2 days ago!

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
We ship worldwide and support our products and customers for life.
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
kal
Forum Administrator



Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10845
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Pub Ale, Electric Creamsicle, London Pride, Wit, Janet's Brown, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Quad, Belgian IPA


PostLink    Posted: Wed Jun 17, 2020 2:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

After having brewed this multiple times (with and without lactose) I've decided I definitely like the lactose version more as it makes it smoother and also helps differentiate it more from our Electric Hop Candy Jr recipe. The the recipe's now been changed to default to using lactose. The option to leave it out is still available for those who prefer not to use it.

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
We ship worldwide and support our products and customers for life.
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
Theo588




Joined: 05 Sep 2019
Posts: 4
Location: Eastern Massachusetts


PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 07, 2020 10:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I brewed this last Sunday, and due to availability of ingredients and me not thinking some things through, I had to make some adjustments.
My local brewing supply store was out of the WY1318, so I ended up substituting Omega's OYL-052 (their "Conan" yeast). No big deal, but I wasn't paying for four packages. I made a starter with 2000ml of wort, following the procedure on the site. All good until I was ready to pitch, and since I'm fermenting in two 7-gallon conicals, I realized I had to split the slurry in the bottom of the flask into two batches (that's the not thinking things through part). Put the fresh wort into the flask, swirled it around the loosen the yeast, and then I eyeballed half into each fermenter. Sealed up, locks on, ready to go.

Next day, one is bubbling away, the other is quiet. I suspected I might have underpitched and/or under-aerated the other one. So yes, I popped the lid and aerated again with the Fizz-X rod. Five days later, the first one is fairly clear and the second one looks like a wheatgrass smoothie--It won't settle. I pulled a few ounces from the racking port into a water bottle and placed it in a 34degree fridge for an hour to see if it would clarify, and it looks like it is. The gravity reading is the same as the other one, which is encouraging, but I haven't worked up the courage to taste it yet.

Fermentation isn't finished, and so I haven't moved it to my bright tank or done the last hop addition (2 ounces into each).
Can I filter this somehow to salvage this debacle? I was really hoping to transfer both batches to the same bright tank (I have a converted half barrel or a 10-gallon corny I could use). I could also rack to individual corny kegs to be extra safe if need be.

Anyone have any big ideas? Thanks for any insights.
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator



Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10845
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Pub Ale, Electric Creamsicle, London Pride, Wit, Janet's Brown, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Quad, Belgian IPA


PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 07, 2020 11:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi and welcome to the forum!

Theo588 wrote:
Next day, one is bubbling away, the other is quiet. I suspected I might have underpitched and/or under-aerated the other one. So yes, I popped the lid and aerated again with the Fizz-X rod. Five days later, the first one is fairly clear and the second one looks like a wheatgrass smoothie--It won't settle. I pulled a few ounces from the racking port into a water bottle and placed it in a 34degree fridge for an hour to see if it would clarify, and it looks like it is. The gravity reading is the same as the other one, which is encouraging, but I haven't worked up the courage to taste it yet.

What is that gravity reading?

As well, by all means taste it. That's an important thing to do throughout the brewing process to understand what's going on, from the initial raw grain, to the sweet wort, to the partially or fully fermented beer. Taste, taste, taste. It helps you understand what's going on. There's nothing to be afraid of. At the end of the day how it tastes is all that matters. The numbers are secondary.

Quote:
Fermentation isn't finished

How do you know that / how did the ascertain that?

Quote:
Can I filter this somehow to salvage this debacle?

If fermentation isn't done, let fermentation finish first. See the NOTES/PROCESS instructions.

Quote:
I was really hoping to transfer both batches to the same bright tank (I have a converted half barrel or a 10-gallon corny I could use). I could also rack to individual corny kegs to be extra safe if need be. Anyone have any big ideas? Thanks for any insights.

Wait until both are done (wait until fermentation is done). From the NOTES/PROCESS instructions:

"Continue to ferment at 68F (wort temperature) until approximately 5 points from final gravity and then raise the temperature to 70-72F until finished. In our case we simply turn off the fermenting fridges and allow the beer to naturally rise to room temperature. Assume fermentation is done if the gravity does not change over ~3 days."

Until fermentation is done, I do not suggest moving on.

What's the gravity at for both now? What was the gravity before you pitched the yeast?

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
We ship worldwide and support our products and customers for life.
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
Theo588




Joined: 05 Sep 2019
Posts: 4
Location: Eastern Massachusetts


PostLink    Posted: Sat Aug 08, 2020 10:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the guidance--Here's where we stand:

Quote:
What is that gravity reading?

As well, by all means taste it.

O.G. was 1.058, and the wheatgrass smoothie is currently at 1.022; the other one is reading the same. I tasted the sludgy one finally, and it tasted fine, essentially the same as the other one.
I figured they weren't done based on the target final gravity.
I'm bringing them up to 72 now, and I'm an optimist, but I'm skeptical that this other one will clear at all. The only way I could get a sample to test and taste was to put some in my lagering fridge and let the sludge drop out. The other one comes out of the racking port essentially clear. Compare and contrast--
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/cysrs8ozx4qs38h/AADaGE_hhDdV3VrZnZCy1Au0a?dl=0
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator



Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10845
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Pub Ale, Electric Creamsicle, London Pride, Wit, Janet's Brown, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Quad, Belgian IPA


PostLink    Posted: Sat Aug 08, 2020 10:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Reading through this again, I have further questions to try and help out and see what went wrong (if anything):

Theo588 wrote:
My local brewing supply store was out of the WY1318, so I ended up substituting Omega's OYL-052 (their "Conan" yeast). No big deal, but I wasn't paying for four packages. I made a starter with 2000ml of wort , following the procedure on the site.

What was your target number of yeast cells? I believe you're fermenting around 12 gallons and a 2L starter sounds small. When I make 12 gallons of this wort and want to use very old yeast I tend to start with 3.2L. Assumption is that I'm starting with 1 billion cells however as it's old. I want to get to 438B which is the case no matter how old the yeast is (only affects the starter size).

What was the manufacturing date on the OYL-052 pack? How many cells were you assuming you were getting from it?

Theo588 wrote:
O.G. was 1.058

Were you aiming on it being this much higher than the recipe? (The recipe calls for 1.052). No big deal of course, just trying to understand why you were at 1.058.

Is this the first time brewing this recipe?
First time using your setup?
How long have you been brewing / how many batches in are you? I only ask this to better understand your brewing background and everyone goes through an initial period of trying to understand how this all works and the newer someone is to brewing, the less likely they're going to notice where they strayed from a recommended process (which is completely normal of course).

Quote:
and the wheatgrass smoothie is currently at 1.022; the other one is reading the same. I tasted the sludgy one finally, and it tasted fine, essentially the same as the other one.

How long did it take to go from 1.058 to 1.022?
What temperature did you ferment at? What was your fermentation schedule?
How are you measuring gravity? Are you compensating for temperature if using a hydrometer?

Quote:
I figured they weren't done based on the target final gravity.

If something is done differently from the recipe/process as outlined, then all bets are off and there will be variances. Your target gravity is likely to be different. Your yeast is different so that's one thing that will definitely affect final gravity. I've never used the yeast you used so I'm unsure how it behaves.

Given that everyone brews differently too, target gravities in any recipe you find anywhere (not just ours) are "generalizations". You need to brew/try yourself and adjust for your setup. You used a yeast that's different than in the recipe which I've never used myself so I don't know how it attenuates as compared to WY1318 as mentioned above.


Theo588 wrote:
The only way I could get a sample to test and taste was to put some in my lagering fridge and let the sludge drop out. The other one comes out of the racking port essentially clear. Compare and contrast--
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/cysrs8ozx4qs38h/AADaGE_hhDdV3VrZnZCy1Au0a?dl=0

I'm not sure what to make of the pictures you've attached. One shows a closeup of sludge, the other somewhat clearer beer/wort. You should be able to take samples of any beer at any stage of fermentation without getting a ton of sludge. If you get sludge, whatever method you're using to extract a sample isn't working. I can't be more specific than this as I have no idea what fermenters you're using or what you process of extracting samples is. You may want to ask whatever company's fermenters you're using on the best way to extract samples anywhere in the fermentation process using the fermenters you've purchased. They should be able to assist.

As for final gravity, if you're not sure if it's done try a "forced fermentation test" (google it for the procedure) to understand where it should end up. That's the best way to confirm.

Good luck!

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
We ship worldwide and support our products and customers for life.
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
Theo588




Joined: 05 Sep 2019
Posts: 4
Location: Eastern Massachusetts


PostLink    Posted: Sun Aug 09, 2020 11:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here goes, and thanks again:
Quote:
What was your target number of yeast cells? I believe you're fermenting around 12 gallons and a 2L starter sounds small. When I make 12 gallons of this wort and want to use very old yeast I tend to start with 3.2L. Assumption is that I'm starting with 1 billion cells however as it's old. I want to get to 438B which is the case no matter how old the yeast is (only affects the starter size).

What was the manufacturing date on the OYL-052 pack? How many cells were you assuming you were getting from it?
Target was 402billion cells, volume into fermenter was closer to 371billion (per the calculations from brewersfriend.com)
The Omega OYL-052 is supposed to have 150billion cells in a package, and the date was from early July, so I used a count of 103billion, and a volume into the fermenter of 11 gallons (it ended up being a bit more; probably 11.25).
Quote:
Were you aiming on it being this much higher than the recipe? (The recipe calls for 1.052). No big deal of course, just trying to understand why you were at 1.058.

Is this the first time brewing this recipe?
First time using your setup?
How long have you been brewing / how many batches in are you? I only ask this to better understand your brewing background and everyone goes through an initial period of trying to understand how this all works and the newer someone is to brewing, the less likely they're going to notice where they strayed from a recommended process (which is completely normal of course).

I was actually surprised at the O.G., but perhaps the 11+ gallon vs 12 could account for some of this. I'd recently been getting lower O.G. versus expectations, and for this session, I took a good hard look at the grist I milled at the brewstore and decided that it really wasn't milled enough (which set back my start since I was brewing Sunday morning and the store doesn't open until noon, and my grainmill's nylon gears are shot, and, and, and...) Brewstore guy said "Oh, don't use the mill in the corner, we've been having a heck of a time getting it to stay calibrated and it keeps gapping wider. Shame on me for not looking more closely.
I also rounded up the grain bill a bit to 5, 5, 3 and 3 versus your recipe.
1st time this recipe
I've used this setup many times; I have aspirations, but I'm currently on a RIMS system I built with an old (old) Sabco keggle mashtun, plus 2 stainless pots (20 gallon, 18 or so gallon).
I've been brewing all grain for at least 30 years, though sporadically, and never with the degree of precision and control that's the hallmark of a serious home brewer. I've over the last 5 or so years begun to keep a closer eye on water chemistry, pH and process, and generally aiming for a repeatable experience.
Quote:
How long did it take to go from 1.058 to 1.022?
What temperature did you ferment at? What was your fermentation schedule?
How are you measuring gravity? Are you compensating for temperature if using a hydrometer?

Five days to get to 1.022 and fermented at 70degrees. I'm fermenting in my basement, not a fridge, but the temperature there is quite reliable (below grade, rubble foundation, house is really old, like 1700's). No fermentation fridges yet. Because of this, I won't be able to do that last rise, and was (am) going to do the last hop addition at the same temperature.
I'm taking hydrometer and refractometer readings. I'm not yet entirely comfortable with the refractometer yet, but it's been giving me confirmation thus far.
Quote:
I'm not sure what to make of the pictures you've attached. One shows a closeup of sludge, the other somewhat clearer beer/wort. You should be able to take samples of any beer at any stage of fermentation without getting a ton of sludge. If you get sludge, whatever method you're using to extract a sample isn't working. I can't be more specific than this as I have no idea what fermenters you're using or what you process of extracting samples is. You may want to ask whatever company's fermenters you're using on the best way to extract samples anywhere in the fermentation process using the fermenters you've purchased. They should be able to assist.

Therein lies the rub (or the trub?)--The two fermenters are pretty similar; one's an old Blichmann Fermenator 7-gallon, and the other is a Stout Tanks conical. I've taken samples from both the side (racking) outlets. Though I have no scientific basis for my assumption, I think the difference comes down the the fact that I aerated the sludgy one a day after pitching since I thought I'd either under pitched, under aerated, or both. And keep in mind that the sludge picture only looked as good as it did after being in my fridge set at 34 degrees overnight. Prior to that it all looked like the bottom layer.

I expect I have to chalk up at least half of this batch to user error.

And not to be a broken record, but thanks for taking interest and providing much useful insight. I do appreciate it.
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator



Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10845
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Pub Ale, Electric Creamsicle, London Pride, Wit, Janet's Brown, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Quad, Belgian IPA


PostLink    Posted: Mon Aug 10, 2020 12:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Theo588 wrote:
Target was 402billion cells, volume into fermenter was closer to 371billion (per the calculations from brewersfriend.com). The Omega OYL-052 is supposed to have 150billion cells in a package, and the date was from early July, so I used a count of 103billion, and a volume into the fermenter of 11 gallons (it ended up being a bit more; probably 11.25).

Ok, cool - not an issue.

Quote:
I took a good hard look at the grist I milled at the brewstore and decided that it really wasn't milled enough (which set back my start since I was brewing Sunday morning and the store doesn't open until noon, and my grainmill's nylon gears are shot, and, and, and...) Brewstore guy said "Oh, don't use the mill in the corner, we've been having a heck of a time getting it to stay calibrated and it keeps gapping wider. Shame on me for not looking more closely.

You've got a recirculating setup (RIMS) then a looser mill for better flow will typically give you better mash efficiency than tighter. I recommend around 0.045" to 0.05" mill gap for people who build my design.

Quote:
I've been brewing all grain for at least 30 years, though sporadically, and never with the degree of precision and control that's the hallmark of a serious home brewer. I've over the last 5 or so years begun to keep a closer eye on water chemistry, pH and process, and generally aiming for a repeatable experience.

Ok, with 30 years you've definitely got the experience. Just wanted to double check. Wink

Quote:
How long did it take to go from 1.058 to 1.022?
What temperature did you ferment at? What was your fermentation schedule?
How are you measuring gravity? Are you compensating for temperature if using a hydrometer?


Quote:
Five days to get to 1.022 and fermented at 70degrees. I'm fermenting in my basement, not a fridge, but the temperature there is quite reliable (below grade, rubble foundation, house is really old, like 1700's). No fermentation fridges yet. Because of this, I won't be able to do that last rise, and was (am) going to do the last hop addition at the same temperature. I'm taking hydrometer and refractometer readings.

Should be fine. Even if that 1.022 is with the hydrometer and you didn't compensate for temp, worst case you're off by a point or so. 70F is fine too. A touch higher than I'd do from the start but I doubt you'd notice any difference, and more importantly it should ferment faster as it's warmer. It should have been nearly fermented out after that 5 days, especially with the hop addition after 1 day as that tends to get things moving.

So I'm confused. Out of the information provided I don't see any obvious reasons why it's still at 1.022. That said, it's only been 5 days so leave it for another week and see what happens and let us know.

I've never used the yeast you used so I don't know if it has any special considerations. EDIT: Actually, I have used it as supposedly OYL-052 is the "conan" strain that I've used as WLP095: https://shop.theelectricbrewery.com/pages/white-labs-wlp095-burlington-ale-yeast
I don't remember there being any special rules other than it throws some diacetyl so good to increase temp a bit near the end to clean that up.

Cheers!

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
We ship worldwide and support our products and customers for life.
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
Theo588




Joined: 05 Sep 2019
Posts: 4
Location: Eastern Massachusetts


PostLink    Posted: Mon Aug 10, 2020 2:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks! I'm feeling a bit better about the outcome. I pulled samples late yesterday, and the gravity of both have dropped a tad. That, and the sludgy one seems to be clearing up a bit more.
I'm moving these to a slightly warmer place in the basement for a few days, then I'll proceed with the last hop addition and go from there.
I'll post a post-mortem when I finally get this into a glass.
You're never too old to learn, so thanks!
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator



Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10845
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Pub Ale, Electric Creamsicle, London Pride, Wit, Janet's Brown, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Quad, Belgian IPA


PostLink    Posted: Mon Aug 10, 2020 3:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cool. Glad to hear it's still dropping. Sometimes yeast has a mind of it's own, so best to just wait. Enjoy the beer!

EDIT: And thanks for signing up as a Club Member and supporting our forum! It's appreciated!

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
We ship worldwide and support our products and customers for life.
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
701pilot




Joined: 10 May 2016
Posts: 49
Location: northern california

Drinking: Bohemian Pilsner,Caribou Slobber, Munich Helles, Weissbier, Black Bute Porter, RIS, Irish Red Ale

Working on: Milk Chocolate Stout


PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 14, 2020 6:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kal,

What do you think of the Creamsicle you brewed with Idaho 7 hops? I just keged mine two days ago. Not only did I change the hops, I used Imperial Juice yeast. Well I'm not impressed. Don't get me wrong it is a good pale ale, just not the Creamsicle I first brewed with the Sabro hops and WY1318. They say the Juice yeast is similar to the 1318, not sure what that means.

It did not attenuate as well, 1.018 instead of 1.009 finished gravity. That also means lower ABV.
Not as much hop aroma and flavor, bitterness seems to be about the same.

This weekend I'm trying it again with the Sabro and the Imperial Dry Hop yeast. I'll let you know how it turns out. This one only takes two weeks, malt to glass, I like that. Easier to compare side by side. I only have two bottles of the original Creamsicle left so I can compare all of them together. None of these have lactose in them, just the original recipe.

_________________
Mark

I can't change the laws of physics but with enough horse power I can chase it into submission.
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator



Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10845
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Pub Ale, Electric Creamsicle, London Pride, Wit, Janet's Brown, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Quad, Belgian IPA


PostLink    Posted: Fri Aug 14, 2020 6:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

701pilot wrote:
What do you think of the Creamsicle you brewed with Idaho 7 hops?

Love it! It's been on tap for about 2 weeks now. Tastes like the hop description: "juicy tropical and stone fruit, supported by sticky pine and fainter notes of earthy black tea."

I think I prefer the original Sabro version, but that's just a personal choice. Both are good. I have a few other "new to me" hops I want to try too.

Quote:
I used Imperial Juice yeast. Well I'm not impressed. Don't get me wrong it is a good pale ale, just not the Creamsicle I first brewed with the Sabro hops and WY1318. They say the Juice yeast is similar to the 1318, not sure what that means.

Yeah, who knows. I've never used it myself and frankly WY1318 is somewhat of a 'magical' yeast with all of the biotransformation it does too to the hop oils. Not sure if Imperial Juice does the same though they do mention "Juice is the go-to strain for hazy, juicy New England style IPAs."

Quote:
It did not attenuate as well, 1.018 instead of 1.009 finished gravity. That also means lower ABV.
Not as much hop aroma and flavor, bitterness seems to be about the same.

They do also state this on the Imperial Juice yeast product page:

"This strain has demonstrated the need for higher wort dissolved oxygen (DO) levels than most ale strains. Target 20-25 ppm DO or set the oxygen regulator flow to 50% higher than normal."

20-25 ppm is pretty high and could explain the under-attenuation. Take a look here as to how to do it: https://shop.theelectricbrewery.com/pages/aerating-oxygenating-wort
Assuming you started at the expected 1.052, 1.018 is high. That's 65% attenuation.

Cheers!

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
We ship worldwide and support our products and customers for life.
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
701pilot




Joined: 10 May 2016
Posts: 49
Location: northern california

Drinking: Bohemian Pilsner,Caribou Slobber, Munich Helles, Weissbier, Black Bute Porter, RIS, Irish Red Ale

Working on: Milk Chocolate Stout


PostLink    Posted: Fri Feb 19, 2021 8:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the recipe you mention style ranges. What style guide do you use to get those ranges?

I haven't found a BJCP style guide for a NEPA.

_________________
Mark

I can't change the laws of physics but with enough horse power I can chase it into submission.
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator



Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10845
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: Pub Ale, Electric Creamsicle, London Pride, Wit, Janet's Brown, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Belgian Quad, Belgian IPA


PostLink    Posted: Fri Feb 19, 2021 9:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fair question! While there's a style for NEIPA in the 2015 BJCP, there isn't one for NEPA.
In this case I used the American Pale Ale style, as that's what the beer would fall under.

al

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
We ship worldwide and support our products and customers for life.
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic   Printer-friendly view    TheElectricBrewery.com Forum Index -> Recipes & Ingredients All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2
Page 2 of 2
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Support our site by purchasing through this link. We thank you!

Forum powered by phpBB © phpBB Group