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Blonde Ale / Premium Lager
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smaillet



Joined: 04 Jun 2018
Posts: 4



PostLink    Posted: Tue Jun 05, 2018 12:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote


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Thanks for the quick answer Kal. That makes perfect sense. Should have figured that out by myself Smile

As for my second question, any idea why Brewer's Friend calculates the OG for this beer at 1.054 as opposed to 1.048 (see screenshot). As far as I know, I've entered all the parameters exactly like you've got them on your recipe page (95% efficiency). When going through the same exercise with your Electric Pale Ale, I get the same numbers.

Back in Febuary, my friend and I decided that we were going to build our own brewery. He had never done any type of home brewing before. I had done a number of kits a few years back but this would by my first time doing all grain. After doing a bunch of research, watching a lot of youtube videos and gathering as much information as I could possibly absorb, I landed on your site. I was so happy to find such concise information organized so well. We basically took your blueprint and built our brewery based on all the information on your site. You've built this tremendous library and have done a great service to the home brewing community and for that I thank you.

We have brewed our first 2 batches (Blonde Ale and Electric Pale Ale) and all things considered, both brew days went pretty well. We are still learning and there are a number of kinks to work out but we are really enjoying it. Both batches are currently in fermenters and we can't wait to taste them.

I just wanted to take a moment to thank you. There is a lot of information out there on the internet and it's easy to get overwhelmed. It was such a relief to a resource that had it all neatly organized in a manner that was so easy to follow. Your efforts are certainly appreciated.

Stephane



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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9839
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Janet's Brown, Maibock, Kolsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: West Coast Blaster (American Red IPA)


PostLink    Posted: Tue Jun 05, 2018 12:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

smaillet wrote:
Thanks for the quick answer Kal. That makes perfect sense. Should have figured that out by myself Smile

No worries - you're not the first to ask so I've updated all the recipes now to hopefully make it clearer that it's the style guidelines.

Quote:
As for my second question, any idea why Brewer's Friend calculates the OG for this beer at 1.054 as opposed to 1.048 (see screenshot). As far as I know, I've entered all the parameters exactly like you've got them on your recipe page (95% efficiency). When going through the same exercise with your Electric Pale Ale, I get the same numbers.

Afraid not. I've never used their software. My only guess is something to do with your boil off rate maybe as that's not something I see listed in your screenshot? Make sure that it knows you're getting 12 gallons post boil.

It could also have to with grain maximum yield. See: http://www.theelectricbrewery.com/FAQ#What_sort_of_efficiency_do_you_achieve_with_your_setup_

Thanks for the compliments! Glad to hear it's worked out well for you! Happy brewing!

Kal

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chastuck



Joined: 06 Oct 2013
Posts: 182
Location: Beckenham, Kent, UK

Drinking: Bitter

Working on: IPA


PostLink    Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 1:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm going to brew this recipe as the lager version and use W-34/70 dry yeast. I was wondering about the rehydration aspect of the yeast. Normally to rehydrate dry yeast I would use sterile water or wort at roughly 70F. Meanwhile of course before pitching I have cooled the wort down to around 50F. I have heard that pitching a warm yeast into a colder wort would send it to 'sleep'. Do I have to cool the rehydrated yeast mixture down to the wort temperature before pitching into the wort?
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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9839
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Janet's Brown, Maibock, Kolsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: West Coast Blaster (American Red IPA)


PostLink    Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 5:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would usually rehydrate dry yeast in room temp water.

Kal

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alphakry



Joined: 27 Oct 2018
Posts: 37


Drinking: Cider [extract]

Working on: Gin Barrel Saison [extract]


PostLink    Posted: Fri Feb 08, 2019 5:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

looking at hallertau hops, I see a few varieties such as Blanc, Hersbrucker, Mittelfruh and Tradition.
I'm guessing you typically use the latter variety, such as what Morebeer sells

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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9839
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Janet's Brown, Maibock, Kolsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: West Coast Blaster (American Red IPA)


PostLink    Posted: Fri Feb 08, 2019 6:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Correct.

Hallertau, Hallertauer and Hallertauer Mittelfrüher are all names for the original German Hallertau variety.
In German, the addition of "er" means where something or someone originated.

You could use any of these really (even though they'll be slightly different):

https://www.morebeer.com/products/hallertau-mittelfruh-hops-pellets.html?a_aid=theelectricbrewery
https://www.morebeer.com/products/german-tradition-hops-pellets.html?a_aid=theelectricbrewery
https://www.morebeer.com/products/hersbrucker-hops-pellets.html?a_aid=theelectricbrewery

I purposely wasn't overly specific in the recipe as I frankly don't think it matters. Not that it won't taste different, but that the different is subjective and personal. All will be good and it's going to be a matter of taste if you prefer one over the other. I'm simply recommending a noble German hop, preferably of the Hallertau variety. If there's a different noble hop you prefer, but all means go for it. I sometimes use (American) Crystal myself as it's close to noble and clean tasting.

The noble hops are:

Hallertau
Hersbrucker
Saaz
Tettnanger
Spalt

Any of these could be used.

That's part of the fun of brewing - trying different things to see how they taste. This is a fun experiment to try: http://www.bertusbrewery.com/2013/03/dry-hopped-bud-light.html

That said, in this recipe with only 60 min hops, there won't be a ton of hop flavour - mostly bitterness.

Hallertau Blanc is completely different, more of an American style with pineapple and grape. You could certainly use that too of course but it wasn't what I had in mind. I went with something more noble/old school.

Kal

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alphakry



Joined: 27 Oct 2018
Posts: 37


Drinking: Cider [extract]

Working on: Gin Barrel Saison [extract]


PostLink    Posted: Fri Mar 08, 2019 7:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If I'm unable to cold crash the beer much colder then 55 degrees or so - will the gelatine still be helpful in clearing the beer and easy to remove when racking?

And is it even worth bringing the beer down to this temp if i can't get much lower?

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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9839
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Janet's Brown, Maibock, Kolsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: West Coast Blaster (American Red IPA)


PostLink    Posted: Fri Mar 08, 2019 9:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

alphakry wrote:
If I'm unable to cold crash the beer much colder then 55 degrees or so - will the gelatine still be helpful in clearing the beer and easy to remove when racking? And is it even worth bringing the beer down to this temp if i can't get much lower?

Whenever I use gelatin on beers like this that I want very clear, I use it at room temp. Some say it'll work better with colder beer probably because it also gets rid of chill haze.

Kal

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alphakry



Joined: 27 Oct 2018
Posts: 37


Drinking: Cider [extract]

Working on: Gin Barrel Saison [extract]


PostLink    Posted: Tue Apr 09, 2019 2:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

what about fermenting this beer under pressure? I was thinking that I'd let the gravity drop to around 1.020 and then slap on a spunding valve / prv manifold to let it start to naturally carbonate, to cut down on the time it'll take to reach my glass! Smile
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kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 9839
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Janet's Brown, Maibock, Kolsch, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: West Coast Blaster (American Red IPA)


PostLink    Posted: Tue Apr 09, 2019 12:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sure, you can do that. You can do that with any beer. Keep in mind that this beer is supposed clean tasting and will benefit by conditioning for a month or two near freezing before serving. So while you may shave some time off fermentation by doing it under pressure, the beer will still be best if left alone and cold for some time after that...

Fermenting under pressure is (in theory) also supposed result in an overall reduction in yeast ester and fusel production, so maybe that conditioning time is lessened as well? Haven't tried it so I can't confirm...

Kal

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alphakry



Joined: 27 Oct 2018
Posts: 37


Drinking: Cider [extract]

Working on: Gin Barrel Saison [extract]


PostLink    Posted: Tue Apr 09, 2019 1:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

thanks Kal! I'm giving it a go and will report back!!

I have a fresh 1BBL batch that i slapped on the prv once it dropped to around 1.018 so we'll see how everything turns out once it sits in the conditioning fridge for a while. It's currently @ 12PSI at 70F

when storing them near freezing for 1-2 months, do you keep them on CO2 that entire time so that they're carb'd and ready to serve right out of storage? (new to kegging so my apologies for the n00b learning)

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