Return to TheElectricBrewery.com
  [ Shop ]   [ Building ]   [ Using ]   [ Recipes ]   [ Testimonials ]   [ Gallery ]   [ FAQ ]   [ About Us ]   [ Contact Us ]   [ Newsletter ]

Log inLog in   RegisterRegister   User Control PanelUser Control Panel   Private MessagesPrivate Messages   MembershipClub Memberships   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   Photo AlbumsPhoto Albums   Forum FAQForum FAQ


Kern River Citra Double IPA
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic   Printer-friendly view    TheElectricBrewery.com Forum Index -> Recipes & Ingredients
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10077
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Cali Common, Maibock, Helles, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Weizen


PostLink    Posted: Wed Jun 15, 2016 12:39 am    Post subject: Kern River Citra Double IPA Reply with quote


        Register to remove this ad. It's free!


Recipe is here: https://shop.theelectricbrewery.com/pages/kern-river-citra-double-ipa

Questions? Ask below. Cheers!

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0


Last edited by kal on Wed Oct 16, 2019 9:20 pm; edited 17 times in total
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
raffeja



Joined: 22 May 2014
Posts: 12
Location: Asheville, NC


PostLink    Posted: Thu Jun 16, 2016 12:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Boil for 60 minutes. Lid on at flameout, start chilling immediately."

Should this be updated to include the 20 minute whirlpool?
Back to top
stickyfinger



Joined: 04 May 2014
Posts: 172
Location: hudson valley, NY


PostLink    Posted: Thu Jun 16, 2016 5:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

have you ever compared dry hopping in the primary vs dry hopping in a second vessel?
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10077
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Cali Common, Maibock, Helles, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Weizen


PostLink    Posted: Thu Jun 16, 2016 7:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

raffeja wrote:
"Boil for 60 minutes. Lid on at flameout, start chilling immediately."

Should this be updated to include the 20 minute whirlpool?

Good catch! Thanks for noticing. I've now updated it.

stickyfinger wrote:
have you ever compared dry hopping in the primary vs dry hopping in a second vessel?

I've done both many times in different ways. Often when multiple hop additions are required I'll do the first round at the end or near the end of fermentation in the primary vessel and then rack off into the secondary once fermentation is done and continue with more dry hopping. I've also done it in the keg.

I've never however done a split batch where one is dry hopped in the primary and the other in the secondary to see what differences there would be so it's hard to compare the different practices as all beers are different. If you try a split batch using the two methods please report back and let us know what you think.

If you read up on it brewers will say it's indeed different dry hopping on yeast in the primary near the end of fermentation vs off most of the yeast in the secondary (or brite tank). Not better or worse, just different. I've heard some brewers say they prefer the taste when done in the primary. Probably depends on the hops, the beer, and the brewer's preference. Some will say that the yeast tends to eat up or absorb some of the hop oils so you need to add more hops to compensate.

I quite often do dry hop in the primary as I like the results and it's much easier to rack/clean as I usually use plastic buckets for the primary. Right now I have an Electric Pale Ale (4.3% version) fermenting at ~64-66F. Usually after about a week I'll add the dry hops directly to the buckets after fermentation is pretty much done and then leave it for another week so that it's definitely done. Then rack to glass 5 gallon carboys (my brite tanks), add gelatin, wait ~2 days, and then keg.

Good luck!

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10077
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Cali Common, Maibock, Helles, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Weizen


PostLink    Posted: Thu Jun 16, 2016 7:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Speaking of dry hopping and this Citra Double IPA:

If you listen to the podcast you'll hear how the Kyle of Kern River dry hops under pressure. What that means is that they do not let any CO2 escape while fermentation finishes and they dry hop - the vessel's sealed tight. The idea is that you're not venting any CO2 out that contains those hop oils. You have to release the pressure each time you go to add new dry hops but I suppose the idea is that during those ~3 days in between the oils infused CO2 has time to get re-absorbed into the beer somewhat.

Tasty (who cloned the beer) didn't do this and they said the results were not any different (the beers tasted the same). This is good because dry hopping under pressure is not something most homebrewers can do. You need a stainless vessel and you have to absolutely be sure to have a pressure relief valve on it that blows if the pressure gets too high (for safety reasons).

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
joeg



Joined: 20 Nov 2013
Posts: 16
Location: PA


PostLink    Posted: Wed Jun 22, 2016 8:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why the 8 lbs less grain than the original recipe posted on the BN?
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10077
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Cali Common, Maibock, Helles, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Weizen


PostLink    Posted: Wed Jun 22, 2016 9:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

joeg wrote:
Why the 8 lbs less grain than the original recipe posted on the BN?

It likely has to do with differences in mash efficiency. Mine's 95%. They probably assume around 70-75% which is about average.

Grain amounts for all recipes always need to be adjusted to compensate for what your system's mash efficiency is compared to what the recipe author assumes. The two are rarely ever the same.

That said, I don't remember the podcast talking about actual amounts, only percentages (though I may be wrong?). I remember talk of 2.2% for some of the specialty malts. Percentages are always the better way to express recipes for many reasons:

(1) All systems have different efficiencies so different amounts are always needed anyway.
(2) Percentages are batch size independent (doesn't matter if you're brewing 5 gallons or 500 gallons).
(3) Percentages are are much easier to understand for an experienced brewer. Seeing something like (for example) what % of the grist is unfermentable malt gives you a good idea what the beer's going to be like. If only amounts are given you have to do the math to calculate how much crystal there is (for example). Whenever someone asks me "how does this recipe look" I have to always convert to percentages for it to make any sense.

When I first started putting recipes online here I toyed with the idea of trying to "make things right" and only post percentages for the grist but chose not to as an inexperienced brewer brewing on my exact design may find it easier to simply use the exact amounts (at least at first).

Good luck!

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
RodrigoEick



Joined: 17 Jul 2015
Posts: 2



PostLink    Posted: Thu Jun 30, 2016 7:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How did the beer turned out?
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10077
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Cali Common, Maibock, Helles, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Weizen


PostLink    Posted: Thu Jun 30, 2016 12:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RodrigoEick wrote:
How did the beer turned out?


Absolutely fantastic! For what it's worth, I only post recipes that I deem 'perfect'. So if you see a beer listed here by me, it's one that may have been brewed a few times already in order to tweak it to perfection.

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
Bennet.stofberg



Joined: 09 Aug 2015
Posts: 2



PostLink    Posted: Mon Jul 04, 2016 2:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Kal,

Your recipes and the background information going with them are always awesome, thanks! I brewed you German Pils a couple of months back and it is my favourite beer I have brewed so far.

I am working on a recipe for an IPA (American IPA) and found the use of 2.5% White wheat malt in this recipe interesting. What would be the benefit of using the white wheat malt, what would happen if you leave it out or increase it to a more significant level?

Kind Regards
Bennet Stofberg
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10077
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Cali Common, Maibock, Helles, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Weizen


PostLink    Posted: Mon Jul 04, 2016 8:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the kind words and glad to hear you're enjoying the recipes Bennet!

While it's not technically my recipe (it belongs to Kyle Smith of Kern River Brewing Company), I can give my opinion:

At lower percentages (5 to 20 percent) of the grist, wheat malt can be added to any number of beer styles to enhance the head retention without clarity problems. You'll often see it in the low single digits to aid in head retention and body as was likely done here.

To quote Malting and Brewing Science, the classic brewing text: "The use of wheat malt at up to 20 percent of the total grist has been claimed to strengthen the yeast, and improve the clarity and head retention of the beer."

Wheat malt is also of course traditional used in beers like Weizens and Witbier where it makes up 40-60% of the grain bill.

More info: http://www.theelectricbrewery.com/wheat-malt


Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
Bennet.stofberg



Joined: 09 Aug 2015
Posts: 2



PostLink    Posted: Tue Jul 05, 2016 8:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the reply Kal, much appreciated
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10077
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Cali Common, Maibock, Helles, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Weizen


PostLink    Posted: Tue Jul 05, 2016 12:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You're welcome! Enjoy the recipe if you get a chance to brew it! It's a very straightforward brew and the results are fantastic (IMHO).

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
Topdollar



Joined: 20 Aug 2015
Posts: 65



PostLink    Posted: Fri Jul 08, 2016 2:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quick question Kal (or anyone who's brewed this): I haven't done many dry hopped beers. I have a couple conical fermentors and I'd like to avoid racking to a bright tank to minimize any chance of oxygenation (that..and isn't this one of the benefits of a conical?).

Would you recommend a trub dump one primary fermentation is done and before I start dry hopping?

As well, once the bulk of fermentation is done at 67, would you forsee any issue letting the temps climb up to ambient (74 degrees right now)?
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10077
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Cali Common, Maibock, Helles, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Weizen


PostLink    Posted: Fri Jul 08, 2016 3:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Topdollar wrote:
Quick question Kal (or anyone who's brewed this): I haven't done many dry hopped beers. I have a couple conical fermentors and I'd like to avoid racking to a bright tank to minimize any chance of oxygenation (that..and isn't this one of the benefits of a conical?).

Would you recommend a trub dump one primary fermentation is done and before I start dry hopping?

Sure - if using conicals you can drop the trub and then try hop. Same result. For what it's worth, oxygenation isn't an issue with racking if you always purge the target vessel with CO2 (something I always whenever racking, regardless of beer style).

Quote:
As well, once the bulk of fermentation is done at 67, would you forsee any issue letting the temps climb up to ambient (74 degrees right now)?

Nope. Once the bulk of fermentation is done, raising a bit would not be an issue. In fact, it can help with attenuation if you tend to have problems.

Enjoy the beer!

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
Topdollar



Joined: 20 Aug 2015
Posts: 65



PostLink    Posted: Fri Jul 08, 2016 4:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Kal - I actually bought a couple of plastic 5 gal PET carboys I plan to eventually use as brite tanks to free up the conicals. But trying to drag those suckers in and out of a keezer to cold crash is a challenge...can't wait to start investing a bit more into larger dedicated fridge after an upcoming move.
Back to top
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10077
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Cali Common, Maibock, Helles, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Weizen


PostLink    Posted: Fri Jul 08, 2016 1:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd be careful using any sort of plastic as a brite tank/secondary as many do allow oxygen to permeate. Nothing wrong with plastic as a fermentation vessel as the beer's outgassing CO2 constantly, but once that stops, you want to be careful. For this reason I always use glass carboys as a secondary or brite tank if I need to age beer or leave it. (Though leaving only a few days to clear isn't going to do much)

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
chastuck



Joined: 06 Oct 2013
Posts: 184
Location: Beckenham, Kent, UK

Drinking: Bitter

Working on: IPA


PostLink    Posted: Fri Jul 08, 2016 1:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kal wrote:
I'd be careful using any sort of plastic as a brite tank/secondary as many do allow oxygen to permeate. Nothing wrong with plastic as a fermentation vessel as the beer's outgassing CO2 constantly, but once that stops, you want to be careful. For this reason I always use glass carboys as a secondary or brite tank if I need to age beer or leave it. (Though leaving only a few days to clear isn't going to do much)

Kal

That's interesting you should say that plastic vessels may permeate oxygen Kal, but I wonder if there is any empirical evidence to back this up? I often bulk-age beer in purpose-made plastic fermenting barrels from Brouwland (www.brouwland.com), sometimes for 6 months with an imperial stout, and have never had problems. Even if the stored beer has stopped fermenting, I wonder if the higher density of what's in the vessel compared to free air would actually prevent oxygen getting in.
Back to top
View user's photo album (1 photos)
kal
Forum Administrator


Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 10077
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Drinking: German Lager, Electric Hop Candy Jr, Scottish 70/-, Cali Common, Maibock, Helles, Russian Imperial Stout, Black Butte Porter

Working on: Weizen


PostLink    Posted: Fri Jul 08, 2016 1:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

chastuck wrote:
That's interesting you should say that plastic vessels may permeate oxygen Kal, but I wonder if there is any empirical evidence to back this up?

Sure - probably thousands. It's a well known phenomenon and I imagine a lot of studies have been done in the food/beverage packaging industry to weigh pros and cons of using more expensive packaging (ie: glass) as compared to cheaper ones (ie: plastic). Googling "plastic permeability" comes up with a bunch. What you store, how, and in what sort of plastic will have varying results of course.

Any material has a certain permeability too - even glass. Permeability of various materials substances It's an extremely well studied field. More info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Permeation

Permeability is known to occur, what exactly the effects are based on what you're storing, for how long, in what conditions (pressure/temp/etc) are the really important questions I suppose.

Sometimes oxygen pickup is good too. Think of aging in barrels. They're actually meant to breath. In some cases you may want more oxygen permeability.

Take for example the company http://www.flextankusa.com/ who make wire storage containers. They offer up this chart of Oxygen permeability of various materials and include their own FlexTank product in the list:



In some cases you'd actually want to store your wine in something that breaths more. Sometimes you don't. In their case their Flextanks sit right between old and new barrels because with wine aging you usually want some breathing.

I could see wanting some breathing with beers like a RIS or a Barleywine you want to age for a long time. For others (such as this hop forward beer) I would say you don't. Oxygen destroys hop flavour/aroma/freshness.

I only bring it up as something to consider/possibly look in to/make sure you're aware.

Kal

_________________
Our new shop with over 150 new products: shop.TheElectricBrewery.com
Purchasing through our affiliate links helps support our site at no extra cost to you. We thank you!
My basement/bar/brewery build 2.0


Last edited by kal on Fri Jul 08, 2016 3:01 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's photo album (21 photos)
chastuck



Joined: 06 Oct 2013
Posts: 184
Location: Beckenham, Kent, UK

Drinking: Bitter

Working on: IPA


PostLink    Posted: Fri Jul 08, 2016 2:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Kal. Very interesting.
_________________
"And the only time I feel alright is when I'm into drinking. It sort of eases the pain of it and levels out my thinking". Lyric extract "From Clare To Here" by Ralph McTell.
Back to top
View user's photo album (1 photos)
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic   Printer-friendly view    TheElectricBrewery.com Forum Index -> Recipes & Ingredients All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Support our site by purchasing through this link. We thank you!

Forum powered by phpBB © phpBB Group